Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: An interesting end grain gluing test.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    New Zealand's Far North
    Posts
    10,475

    Default An interesting end grain gluing test.

    I came across this earlier today, and found that Davebrown has made a post about it in Building and Repair.......Comments?

    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Cumbria, UK
    Posts
    295

    Default Re: An interesting end grain gluing test.

    Thread already running on this topic transferred my comments to it.

    See "Can't believe this one, what do you guys think?"
    Last edited by oldcodger; 09-08-2021 at 02:48 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Location
    Oriental, NC ,usa
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: An interesting end grain gluing test.

    As a woodworker, I accepted the common knowledge and worked most of my projects and joints that way. As an engineer who usually questions common knowledge, I am slightly embarrassed. Since I have long argued that the overlap of joints such as a scarf or lap is mostly overkill long after using scarfs shorter than many claim is necessary reduces the level of embarrassment only a little.

    Proper tests with proper procedure, proper equipment and proper technique is impossible to beat.

    Many thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    downward bound
    Posts
    9,362

    Default Re: An interesting end grain gluing test.

    A perfect endgrain joint isn’t bad. How far off perfect do things get bad?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Hull, QC, Canada
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: An interesting end grain gluing test.

    Definitely food for thought and illuminating.

    But I've been trying to think of a case where this information would cause me to design a joint differently and I can't. I think maybe the whole don't glue end grain thing is just an easy-to-understand way of explaining why some kinds of joints are weak - ie. when the tension loads are not transferred to long grain.

    Also, I think wood movement is an issue too. I don't think endgrain glued to side grain would be very stable with changing moisture content.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Blacksburg, VA
    Posts
    500

    Default Re: An interesting end grain gluing test.

    Interesting and informative video. The results, however, don't do much to change glued joint design practice.

    When you bend wood across the grain (the strong way) you plan on using the strength of the wood fibers. If you put a butted glue joint in the mix, it will fail well before the wood fibers fail. The video shows this. You can fix the problem with a scarf or a butt block.

    If you bend wood along the grain (the weak way) you've screwed up, unless you're a karate student trying to demonstrate your fabulous powers.
    I will beg you for advice, your reply will be concise, and I will listen very nicely and then go out and do exactly what I want! (Apologies to Lerner and Lowe.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •