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Thread: Workshop in forecabin…

  1. #1
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    Default Workshop in forecabin…

    This is a request for ideas.

    I have more boat than I need and I am wondering about fitting a workbench in the forecabin, which isn’t used for sleeping at sea, but is a sail and gear store, though she is happier if most of the weight is kept out of it.

    The boat is made of frozen snot, with the only wood on deck being the cap rail and the cockpit gratings, though we do carry a glued lapstrake dinghy.

    Hand tools only of course. Bench, vice, pillar drill… anything else?
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    tools and spares for your standing and running rigging
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    The boat is made of frozen snot, with the only wood on deck being the cap rail and the cockpit gratings, though we do carry a glued lapstrake dinghy.
    No wooden wash boards or hatch lids? You will carry timber and ply to make replacements, wont you?

    Pillar drill seems OTT, unless you have one that you can clamp an electric drill into. Otherwise, I would think a pillar drill is a bit heavy.
    I would have a vice that is portable, so that it will not be in the way when planing timber on the bench. You will need bench dogs and an apron on the bench, to which you can clamp a board to plane or shave its edge. Put holes in the apron, so that you can insert pegs to support the workpiece at the correct height when trimming an edge.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Cordless drill

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Why not something like a Roman or Japanese style bench? They're portable, lend themselves to hand tool use, and can be made for very little. I've got a split top knee bench that I need to finish up, but even unfinished it's getting more regular use than the taller bench.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Ingenious Mechanicks by Christopher Schwarz - mine of ideas for woodworking.

    See also the "Grandpa Amu" youtube channel for very very clever workholding and a flexible minimalist toolkit - combined with awe inspiring skill.

    e.g.

    Do you need metalworking equipment, plumbing and electrical toolkits as well.

    resin, fibre, mixing and measuring kit - brushes/rollers - cleanup gear......
    Last edited by P.I. Stazzer-Newt; 08-11-2021 at 02:36 PM.
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    John Steele (of Covey Island Boat Works fame) built a workshop in the forepeak of the 1893 pilot cutter Marguerite T. Great space. There was enough foot room to stand, and that was about it, but at shoulder height I could extend both arms out straight and turn 360 degrees. Tool racks and a couple of small cabinets on each side, triangular workbench about a meter on each side and fitted with a 6" bench vise, spare ropes hanging in the far forward peak. The major issue was light, but John installed a couple of acorn-shape deck prisms and it was quite bright over the bench. I didn't inventory the tools he had there (all hand tools) but I did note a canvas tool pouch with fids and other rope & canvas working tools and a cabinet under the bench for gooey stuff like grease, tallow, etc.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    A vote here for inexpensive AC/DC ' multimeter' , a pair or two of assorted locking pliers, maybe a few tapered plugs if need to block off a thru-hull, possibly a mini hacksaw.



    Rick

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    This is a request for ideas.

    I have more boat than I need and I am wondering about fitting a workbench in the forecabin, which isn’t used for sleeping at sea, but is a sail and gear store, though she is happier if most of the weight is kept out of it.

    The boat is made of frozen snot, with the only wood on deck being the cap rail and the cockpit gratings, though we do carry a glued lapstrake dinghy.

    Hand tools only of course. Bench, vice, pillar drill… anything else?
    I find that hand tools will do pretty much everything I need as long as I have a big, heavy, rigidly mounted vice mounted where I can stand comfortably at it, and with a reasonable amount of clear space around it. See if you can get one with a "poll" behind the jaws, thats the flat on which you can put things and beat them with a hammer.
    I dont think I'd go for a universal, or swivelling vice, in my experience they're not rigid enough.
    Drill, I've a big old Record 2 speed breast drill, and have put a 5/8 hole through half inch mild steel plate with that, I wouldn't bother with a drill press.

    If you've access to a shore based workshop with the usual engineering machinery, then your forepeak is for repair and maintenance duty, so its not likely that you'd need the really heavy gear, other than the vice that is.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    In Neoga, there is a small "cabin" forward of the V Berth that once was crew quarters - IOW big enough for 2 pipe berths if slung so one went under the other forward. It's now known as the "garage". Extra lines are hung along one side (along with the Danforth), anchor rode is forward under the windlass, and along the aft bulkhead are shelves for plastic totes containing electrical, rigging, plumbing, etc. supplies along with a cordless tool set (drill,impact driver, sawzall, circular saw). The cordless tools are by far the most accessed. Due to space, I have other tools stored under the settee in the main cabin - but some cabinetry work in the garage could move that stuff.

    I have a workmate portable bench that I can set up on deck & it's great, but a workbench with small vise in the garage is "on the to do list" - along with cabinets in the garage.

    Having that space is wonderful & it also moves the V Berth aft enough to where it's completely useful - even in a seaway.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    I “just happen to have” a hand pillar drill that I bought from Frank Knights when he sold up. Now, the vice.. a Record 52 1/2 with quick release and a Record metalwork vice… or an Emmert?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post

    I have more boat than I need and I am wondering about fitting a workbench in the forecabin, which isn’t used for sleeping at sea, but is a sail and gear store, though she is happier if most of the weight is kept out of it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    I “just happen to have” a hand pillar drill that I bought from Frank Knights when he sold up. Now, the vice.. a Record 52 1/2 with quick release and a Record metalwork vice… or an Emmert?
    I have one of those on my workbench. All cast iron and HEAVY.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I have one of those on my workbench. All cast iron and HEAVY.
    That’s the fellow! But less than a spare spinnaker!
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Somewhere in all my 'stuff', I have a small 3" clamp-on vise -- it would probably do for most of what one would need underway, and would clamp onto the workbench only when needed.





    Rick

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    It's turned into a bit of a toolbox thread hasn't it. The vice would be nice. I think a nice set of 18v stuff is worth having, we carry a makita drill and a grinder with a good pack of cut off discs for the unthinkable.
    In the meantime the drills became indispensable for coconut straws and the grinder reformed a few nautilus shells. I call that a win .

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    The Record 74 has a pipe bender, tube grip and anvil. Pretty usefull. You just put it through a hole when you want to use it. Swivels too. The 75 is cast steel rather than cast iron and attaches to a base plate. The choice of car garages in the past.





    The Record Junior 51 C - see how it's got (had) a clamp/ cramp attached to the vice. Really usefull for small work working projects or laminating up (at least getting hold of one end) but I've never found one with the clamp still on it. Worth looking for. Again clamps on off. it'd be nice if someone made that again. Not seen anyone else do it.



    If these are too big the Imp vice was designed for people to carry in the car boot. Just clamps on. Small anvil, (brake) pipe bender etc. Not spendy those for occasional metal work.

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 08-13-2021 at 06:24 AM.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Thanks,Edward.

    Ive actually got an “Imp”.

    The 74 is rather hard to find.

    The reason for the hand pillar drill is that it is really hard to keep a drill steady with the boat jumping about.
    Last edited by Andrew Craig-Bennett; 08-14-2021 at 05:00 AM.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Duct tape and WD 40. How could I forget. Frank
    www.oarandsail.nl

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    Teflon tape and assorted hose clamps (?)

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Workshop in forecabin…

    I've had two engine part failures this week that both required a press to repair. Being without one I was happy to find a machine shop to help me out but if I ever have a boat that can handle the weight it will have a smallish hand press on the bench. Good for winch or windlass bearings in addition to pump rebuilds.

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