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Thread: Bees

  1. #1
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    Default Bees

    I have, I think, honey bees in a concrete block wall in our garden. I don't want to harm them. I wonder whether they will survive our winter in the wall? Is it likely someone wants to "collect" them?

    Thanks - Gary Davis

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bees

    Yep. Look up local beekeepers. And/ or call your locality's animal control dept--they should be able to refer you.

    Kevin
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bees

    Someone might want them, but removal would probably require disassembling the wall to some degree.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Bees

    We have a hive of yellow-faced bumble bees that lives under our front steps. The actual nest is underground and not in our structure in any way. They do their thing, we do ours. They can stay there forever as far as I'm concerned. I'd want to move them if they were honeybees that lived in a wall like yours though.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Davis View Post
    I have, I think, honey bees in a concrete block wall in our garden. I don't want to harm them. I wonder whether they will survive our winter in the wall? Is it likely someone wants to "collect" them?

    Thanks - Gary Davis
    Feed them. Then they'll be there to do their job next spring.

    We've six hives on the family property, there are times of the year when there are clouds of them around, but they're not aggressive, none of us, nor visitors have ever been stung, and honey, we've got honey.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Bees

    Honey bees are easy to identify




    .B7DA6444-3ED0-4D0A-BD5B-DE646F76E6D1.jpg

    If they’re in a CMU block wall you’d need to bust it open to capture the Queen, but there could be a bee keeper in your area who might try .

    You can make a bee Vacumn, and in theory vac the bees out, but a hive wraps around stuff and becomes well attached, so solely using a Vacumn wouldn’t work.

    Would they survive a Montana winter , possibly .
    There are to many unknowns to say for sure.


    There was bee attack in Arizona today. Killed one man , hospitalized two others.
    The article didn’t say what type of bees they where.

    So if you’re not sure what kind they are bee careful , we’ll even if you do , honey bees can kill you, but then lots of things can kill you, none of us gets out of here alive.

  7. #7
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Bees

    Around here, it is a bit of a racket. $500-$700 to remove. But the local list serv may have a hobbyist who will come get them. Maybe. Or the bees may know how to survive on their own if they are not bothering you.

    You can buy the bee keeping hat for 10 buck or so on amazon, dress up in heavy clothes, and blow some smoke their way. Then mess with them. You will find out how aggressive they are. Mine were pretty tame. Or they may be super aggressive and hurt you. Maybe don’t do this.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Bees

    Bee extinction: Why we're saving the wrong bees


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bees

    Listening to the radio yesterday I heard results from a study into bees and caffeine. They like the stuff in small amounts and function better when the get some in the pollen. Apparently they do a dance in the presence of other bees to give them directions to sought after pollen flowers. They dance a lot better under the influence of some caffeine. Who'd of thought?
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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Hallam View Post
    Listening to the radio yesterday I heard results from a study into bees and caffeine. They like the stuff in small amounts and function better when the get some in the pollen. Apparently they do a dance in the presence of other bees to give them directions to sought after pollen flowers. They dance a lot better under the influence of some caffeine. Who'd of thought?
    Honey bees dance for a variety of reasons . None of my books mentioned caffeine . But they dance to lure other bees to where they are forging , and IF they swarm they send out scout to find a new location , like a CMU wall, a water meter , a hollow log, and scout that has the most convincing dance is who they’ll follow to the new hive location.

    They do a lot of fanning to , to spread the Queen sent if they think the other bees need to know her location, like IF the swarm is captured and you have the Queen in a travel box, IF she’s in there the other bees fan her scent to let the sisters know this is the place !
    They also fan for heating and cooling of the hive.

    Honey bees are very interesting bugs!

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Bees

    Honey bee waggle dancing


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Davis View Post
    I have, I think, honey bees in a concrete block wall in our garden. I don't want to harm them. I wonder whether they will survive our winter in the wall? Is it likely someone wants to "collect" them?

    Thanks - Gary Davis
    hook up with the Yellowstone Valley Beekeepers Association. https://www.facebook.com/yvbeekeepers/

    There's a beekeeper that will want them. And probably remove them for free. But you'll be stuck with whatever damage has to be done to the wall to retrieve the hive.

    Also the MSU's Yellowstone County Ag extension: https://yellowstone.msuextension.org/

    And the Montana Department of Agriculture has a beekeeper program. But the website appears to be down at the moment. https://www.agr.mt.gov/BeeProgram
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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Bees

    Thanks so much for the feedback. I was thinking of catching and dispatching one with the hopes of better identification. Maybe I'll do that and post it here to see if anyone recognizes my bees. Ill touch base with the Montana ag folks next week.

    Stay tuned - Gary

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Davis View Post
    Thanks so much for the feedback. I was thinking of catching and dispatching one with the hopes of better identification. Maybe I'll do that and post it here to see if anyone recognizes my bees. Ill touch base with the Montana ag folks next week.

    Stay tuned - Gary
    Honey bees ; Queen has a white dot on her back, just to be clear the white dot was placed on her by a human, not ALL queen bees are “marked”.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Bees

    catch and release. any clues as to the species?

    [IMG]Untitled by Gary Davis, on Flickr[/IMG]

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Bees

    this particular bee was on our oregano but they are on all the different flowers we have

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Davis View Post
    catch and release. any clues as to the species?

    [IMG]Untitled by Gary Davis, on Flickr[/IMG]

    That is a Italian Honey bee , based on the eyes it’s a drone .
    The drones have larger eyes that connect across the top of the head, so they can see Virgin Queens better , so they can give up their lives to insure more bees are born.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Bees

    Grazie

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Bees

    A nest of hornets had developed in the backyard birch tree, which made Wifey Dear uneasy so she called some pest control guy to remove it.

    Now we have a swarm of bees which seem to really love the shallow end of the swimming pool for some reason. Some combination of the heat coming off the bluestone and the reflected light of the water and handrail, I suppose.
    These seem to be some underground burrowing/nesting variety so there's nothing to be done, she's just not hanging out by the pool for the rest of the summer.

    Should've left the hornets alone.
    What color are their hands now?

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Bees

    Son in law had a bumble bee scare a couple days ago. He was bush hogging near a barn when a swarm came out of the ground to attack him, jumped off the tractor and ran a distance getting only one sting. Then saw the tractor rumbling away at idle so he had to run back and hop on it. Something to be said for being light and fast.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Bees

    I spoke with some local bee folks yesterday, and my options are do nothing, tear out the wall to get to them, or poison them. Going with option 1 - at least for now.

    In other insect news, we have been seeing monarch butterflies in the garden - sometimes two at a time. They are such a joy to see.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Bees

    In other insect news, we have been seeing monarch butterflies in the garden - sometimes two at a time. They are such a joy to see.
    I was pleased to see a tiger swallowtail flit through the yards earlier in the year, and then return with regularity day by day. A month or so ago, I started seeing more than one. Then one afternoon I watched a pair of them flit around the bottoms of the tree canopies in the front yard of our house and two neighbors. They flitted together, keeping station, one above the other by about a foot, perfectly, for about ten minutes, flying circuits around the same trees and the spaces between limbs and clusters of leaves. Then they met in mid-air, still flitting, and still flying in the same circuit around the yard trees. They did that for another half a minute or so, then separated, one shooting over the roof of our house, and the other landing motionless in the neighbor's lawn. I imagined having the butterfly equivalent of rolling over to have a smoke after. Baby tiger swallowtails in the offing.

    Watching the two keep station so perfectly I concluded that the apparent randomness of a butterfly's flight is anything but.
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  24. #24
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    Default Re: Bees

    These two monarchs do something similar. They dance together for a while and then land a ways away from each looking spent (wings flat and motionless).

    I've been trying to attract monarchs for many years and this is my first (two).

    Now I wonder where these monarchs are in their migration and which generation in that migration these might be? Will they reproduce and overwinter here and continue north next year or is this as far as they go north?

    Inquiring minds and all.

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