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Thread: Simone Biles

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I can tell you for certain fact that for shotputter, discus throwers, hammer and javelin throwers, no such program exists.

    There is only one program and it looks like this:

    Untold hours in the weight room.
    Untold hours practicing on the field.
    Un-reimbursed trips to the best coaches you can find, for help. If you happen to break into the top seven in your event in the two years before the Olympics, you might get as much as $3500 to help with coaching and travel.
    Untold hours studying film
    untold hours visualizing every microcosm of every movement...untold hours drilling the minutest details of every motion

    The program is thousands and thousands and thousands of hours, over years, for essentially nothing, in terms of money, recognition or fame. The only people who know who you are, are your competitors and the people who came immediately before you, and will come immediately after you, in your sport.

    There is no Olympic Committee Mental Health Program.
    we know that many of those coming from top NCAA schools have access and get training regarding mental health included in their full scholarship rides. Stanford, Cal, UCLA, USC, Michigan, Nebraska, Penn, Alabama. Florida, Florida State etc - all do as incentives to come to the school to get best talent. They also make champions and develop olympic medal winners. Those who come from the outside the training system, they are incredible and worthy of such services considering the effort and dedication to the US team.

    we can all agree that Biles may have brought mental conditioning to the forefront as a part of the developmental program. She ensured that going forward that mental preparation in those hunting for olympic medals will incorporate counseling and mental fitness training. This might bring another greater level of human performance and ability.
    Last edited by Ted Hoppe; 07-29-2021 at 04:37 PM.
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  2. #107
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    we know that many of those coming from top NCAA schools have access and get training regarding mental health included in their full scholarship rides. Stanford, Cal, UCLA, USC, Michigan, Nebraska, Penn, Alabama. Florida, Florida State etc - all do as incentives to come to the school to get best talent. They also make champions and develop olympic medal winners. Those who come from the outside the training system, they are incredible and worthy of such services considering the effort and dedication to the US team.

    we can all agree that Biles may have brought mental conditioning to the forefront as a part of the developmental program. She ensured that going forward that mental preparation in those hunting for olympic medals will incorporate counseling and mental fitness training. This might bring another greater level of human performance and ability.
    I personally know three recent Stanford throwers, as in graduated in 2000, 2018 and 2020. I personally know the UC Berkeley throwing coach. I know the throwing coaches at Sacramento State University and the recently deceased throwing coach at Stanislaus State University. I know at least a dozen other Division I and II shotputters and discus throwers from around the Country who have graduated in the past 20 years.. The only comment I've ever heard from any of them about "training for mental health during competition" was my mentor, Mike Pockoski, who told him that his post-graduate throwing coach, Olympic Silver Medalist John Powell, told him and Mindy that they needed to "compete more" to get used to being in pressure situations, and so to go throw at the Highland Games.

    There is no mental health progrtam for throwers. Maybe in the Big Ten football and basketball programs there are mental health programs. But for the grunt in the shotput ring, the slob in the coxed 8, the slender powerhouse doing pole vault, the kids on the Stanford, Cal, etc. etc. sailing teams, the Stanford wrestling team (I know two former wrestlers and one coach) there is no such mental health and preparedness program.

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I personally know three recent Stanford throwers, as in graduated in 2000, 2018 and 2020. I personally know the UC Berkeley throwing coach. I know the throwing coaches at Sacramento State University and the recently deceased throwing coach at Stanislaus State University. I know at least a dozen other Division I and II shotputters and discus throwers from around the Country who have graduated in the past 20 years.. The only comment I've ever heard from any of them about "training for mental health during competition" was my mentor, Mike Pockoski, who told him that his post-graduate throwing coach, Olympic Silver Medalist John Powell, told him and Mindy that they needed to "compete more" to get used to being in pressure situations, and so to go throw at the Highland Games.

    There is no mental health progrtam for throwers. Maybe in the Big Ten football and basketball programs there are mental health programs. But for the grunt in the shotput ring, the slob in the coxed 8, the slender powerhouse doing pole vault, the kids on the Stanford, Cal, etc. etc. sailing teams, the Stanford wrestling team (I know two former wrestlers and one coach) there is no such mental health and preparedness program.
    Maybe that’s the way it was. Lots of things changed in the last few years. It is also true that sports that have huge alumni following get the help.
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  4. #109
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    I can't speak to the football programs, the basketball programs, the baseball programs. That's where the money is, and after the last 18 months, watching the OBSCENE treatment that the Stanford Athletic directors office dished out to the "non money making programs" I wouldn't doubt that every Stanford football player has his own masseuse... BUT.

    But I can tell you for absolute certainty that there is no such program associated with the Stanford or Cal Rugby teams. I KNOW rugby players on both teams.

    I KNOW athletes on the UCSB and Cal Poly SLO track teams...the throwers. I know those coaches, too. There is no such program, Ted. It simply doesn't exist beyond the usual mental health services available to any student through the student health center. The Coaches do what they can to prep the students for pressure situations. Some are OK at it, some aren't.

  5. #110
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    One last time.

    I can't speak to big Div. I football, basketball and baseball programs. I don't know people in those programs.


    but I know for an absolute certainty, Ted, that the types of mental preparedness, and mental health programs you are referring to are not generally available to varsity athletes in any of the sailing, rugby, wrestling, or T&F programs on the west coast of the USA. Period.

    The Cal Maritime Academy does not devote competitive sail training time to mental health. Neither does Stanford. Period.

  6. #111
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    One last time.
    promise?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  7. #112
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    No doubt and i do agree with you. Here is the NCAA response.

    https://www.ncaa.org/sport-science-i...st-perspective

    Mind, Body and Sport: The psychologist perspective

    By Chris Carr and Jamie Davidson
    Intercollegiate athletics embodies a unique and demanding culture. The pressures and demands on 18- to 21-year-old student-athletes are great. Their wins and losses are seen by many, questioned by many, and often criticized publicly.
    Even within the athletics environment, student-athletes' time demands are enormous – daily practices, competitions that may involve travel (some across time zones), a full academic course load, strength and conditioning programs, and sports medicine/rehab appointments present a demanding schedule indeed. Social interactions and relationships often take a back seat to the athletically related challenges and commitments.
    It is no surprise that these pressures can affect a student-athlete's mental health. A well-trained psychologist with expertise in sport psychology is an ideal resource to provide care and services. But over the past 20 years, the sports psychologist's role in college sports has evolved more slowly than student-athletes' needs.
    The ways colleges and universities use sport psychologists also vary, often depending on resources and how well the athletics department understands how to incorporate these services.
    The following explains both the challenges related to the integration of sport psychologists within college athletics, and the models schools currently use when they do take advantage of such expertise.

    * * * *
    So, which of these models is the best fit? It is important that schools explore all the options for a psychological services model for their student-athletes.
    Clearly, an immersed program with full-time or part-time licensed psychologists allows for better service, communication and delivery of services. Having an immersed sport psychologist allows the athletics department to best address the variety of psychological issues (individual, team, staff) that may be present. Providing a psychologist as part of the support staff also helps to de-stigmatize and normalize the issues related to student-athlete mental health.
    Just as having a full-time sports medicine physician and athletic training staff does not eliminate musculoskeletal injuries, having an immersed full-time/part-time sport psychologist will not eliminate mental health issues. However, as sports medicine care has greatly enhanced prevention, intervention and rehabilitation of athletics injuries, an immersed and comprehensive sport psychology program can enhance the prevention, intervention/counseling and care of student-athlete mental health/psychological issues.
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  8. #113
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  9. #114
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    "Olympic gymnast Simone Biles has gotten a lot of men’s knickers in a quite the twist.

    The Olympic medalist and native Texan made headlines when, citing mental health concerns, she pulled out of the team competition finals in Tokyo this week. Her warmup vaults showed signs that something was wrong. She later said she had a case of the “twisties,” a dangerous disorientation that causes gymnasts to lose track of where their body is in the air. One of the greatest gymnasts in history, Biles performs some of the most dangerous skills in the world. This time, she said: “I could have hurt myself.” She had enough wisdom to prioritize her safety and enough faith in her teammates that they could medal without her. And so they did — winning silver.

    Simple, understandable and human, right? Unfortunately, no. Black women are apparently still expected to sacrifice themselves for a country that refuses to see them as fully human. And indeed a chorus of men began flipping out over Biles’s choices about her own body.

    Conservative commentator Charlie Kirk called her a "shame to the country” and a “sociopath.” "We are raising a generation of weak people like Simone Biles,” he said. In a since-deleted tweet, Texas Deputy Attorney General Aaron Reitz called her a “selfish, childish national embarrassment.” British commentator Piers Morgan (whose recent on-camera athletic feats include storming off set when confronted about his attacks on Meghan Markle) penned a meandering screed about Biles, tennis star Naomi Osaka and other female athletes who have withdrawn from competition, saying there was “nothing heroic or brave” about quitting and that people were shutting down “legitimate criticism” of them by playing the "mental health and race cards.”



    The well-muscled, gold-medaled Biles could probably snap some of these soggy White men in half on her worst day. But many men would do well to quit reacting and reflect on what Biles has done — not just for Black people and women, but for White people and men, too. For Biles is helping to kick down a barrier to better conversations about men’s physical and mental well-being."

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/07/29/biles-is-helping-show-way-mental-health-lets-hope-follow-male-athletes-follow-her-lead/



  10. #115
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    Look at this a bunch of old white guys who can't do a cartwheel bitching about an elite gymnast.
    Might be time to look in that full length mirror.
    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

  11. #116
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    Default Re: Simone Biles

    I believe Div I schools, at least, offer counseling to their athletes (and other students) - my daughter was offered a position at UNL for just that. I don't know what their staff is like, how much interaction they have with the teams, 'pro-actively' - she didn't take that job.

    And just an aside - isn't it funny/strange/unfortunate what emphasis 'we' put on athletics, in general, but esp in school? If the same energy/money was directed at academics - we really would be #1!
    There's a lot of things they didn't tell me when I signed on with this outfit....

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