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Thread: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

  1. #1
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    Default Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    So we've been doing the quintessentially American thing after visiting our son and daughter-in-law, driving east through the Empty Quarter from Helena across Montana and North Dakota to Minneapolis, a bit over a thousand miles in two days. Along the freeway near Valley City ND, milepost 300 from the Montana border, we came upon this:



    There's another smaller sign across the road, attached to a smaller but equally dilapidated building. There are still a few die-hards in rural areas with Trump signs, but not many, and I'd bet that the unofficial sign on the ruined building is a brilliant bit of subtle irony.
    Last edited by Keith Wilson; 07-24-2021 at 10:48 PM.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Earlier in the week I drove two counties away to pick up some meat from the processor. On the edge of a town was a small cluster of homes and trailers one of which had a big 5’x20’ sign saying “Don’t Blame Me, I Voted For Trump”. Down the road from here is a big sign saying “Biden Is Not My President”.

    Some unhappy campers in the heartland,

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    After delivering Catnapper to Annapolis I came home through extreme Eastern NC. Quite a few trump signs.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    I'd bet at pretty long odds that whoever put that up is not a fan of Mr Trump.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    I haven't painted for years but that old barn……………….

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Has it not been opined that satire has been made impossible?
    Ragnar B.

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Keith,

    I'd bet you the guy who put that sign up was utterly sincere. And blind to the irony of its placement. Right-wingers are immune to (and oblivious to) irony.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Driving through northern NY state you can see a lot of Trump signs still up.
    Even here in liberal Vermont, there are die-hards. One idiot in town has several Trump banners hung on his house and a Trump 2024 flag flying from his flagpole.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    I’m stealing that.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    You need to remember that a lot of people get their information from Tucker and his ilk.

    They are being fed, by 'news' media, that the election was stolen.

    Some of these people have young children, and are getting checks every month. I kind of wonder how Tucker and his ilk tell them that's a bad thing, or explain that Republicans did this for them.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by John Smith View Post
    You need to remember that a lot of people get their information from Tucker and his ilk.

    They are being fed, by 'news' media, that the election was stolen.

    Some of these people have young children, and are getting checks every month. I kind of wonder how Tucker and his ilk tell them that's a bad thing, or explain that Republicans did this for them.
    I can explain it.

    The Trumpery masses take the checks and tell themselves that it is OK to do so because the checks are an attempt by Democrats and Liberals to bribe them, so it is OK to take the money and still stick to the True Faith.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

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    Default

    On balance, it is also a rural tradition ( in this country anyway) that old, dilapidated barns are revered and left standing as testament to historical continuity, a marker of a multi-generational family farming, etc..

    Such barns are viewed as monuments and no longer judged for their suitability as buildings.

    Kevin


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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I'd bet at pretty long odds that whoever put that up is not a fan of Mr Trump.
    I got twinny bux sez yer wrong.

    Hundred to one OK?
    Rattling the teacups.

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    ... a big 5’x20’ sign saying “Don’t Blame Me, I Voted For Trump”.
    We had someone post a very similar remark here just yesterday. Denial runs strong in American society.
    "Where you live in the world should not determine whether you live in the world." - Bono

    "Live in such a way that you would not be ashamed to sell your parrot to the town gossip." - Will Rogers

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    On balance, it is also a rural tradition ( in this country anyway) that old, dilapidated barns are revered and left standing as testament to historical continuity, a marker of a multi-generational family farming, etc..

    Such barns are viewed as monuments and no longer judged for their suitability as buildings.

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    In this country, the descendants sell the tumbledown barn to incomers from London as the basis for a “barn conversion”, which is more likely to gain planning approval than a new house (which is really what it is).
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    On balance, it is also a rural tradition ( in this country anyway) that old, dilapidated barns are revered and left standing as testament to historical continuity, a marker of a multi-generational family farming, etc.. Such barns are viewed as monuments and no longer judged for their suitability as buildings.
    Or it's just more trouble than it's worth to tear it down. As you go west from Minnesota, there's sort of a 'rural western aesthetic', where just leaving stuff lying around is totally normal. There's plenty of space, the climate's dry, and nobody's bothered by bunches of defunct vehicles or buildings or farm machinery or RVs or whatever just sitting there in the yard (the 'yard' often being something like 1000 acres). Not really monuments or history; just easier to leave it there until it falls down or rusts away.

    It would be interesting to ask the guy if he's really a Trump supporter. A couple of clues: it's not an official Trump sign, and the similar smaller one across the road (no picture, alas) is on another collapsing building, when there were other nearby choices in better condition. OTOH there are indeed die-hards in rural areas still displaying 'Trump 2020' signs (or 'Trump 2024'). I was initially pretty sure it was ironic, but maybe not.
    Last edited by Keith Wilson; 07-25-2021 at 10:41 AM.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I was initially pretty sure it was ironic, but maybe not.
    Oh, there's no doubt--it is ironic.

    But I doubt the guy who put it up intended it to be so, or even realizes that (and why) it is.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    In this country, the descendants sell the tumbledown barn to incomers from London as the basis for a “barn conversion”, which is more likely to gain planning approval than a new house (which is really what it is).
    Selling an old farm building to someone from the city might be possible 500 miles to the east, but not in North Dakota, even the eastern end. Those who haven't spent time in that part of the world often have difficulty understanding just how empty of people it is. North Dakota and Montana rank 47th and 48th among states in population density, 10 and 7 people per square mile respectively, Wyoming and Alaska (which is in a class by itself) being 49th and 50th. Small towns there have been shrinking and sometimes vanishing for a long time now.

    Never in the past 50 years have I felt more like a kid from New Jersey than in rural Montana, and I haven't lived in NJ since 1970. Another planet entirely.
    Last edited by Keith Wilson; 07-25-2021 at 10:58 AM.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Last September I took a little bicycle ride across NH and into Maine. I was amazed at the profusion of political signs along the road and in people's yards. For, apparently, all political persuasions, and offices. Some were for positions I had never heard of.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    In this country, the descendants sell the tumbledown barn to incomers from London as the basis for a “barn conversion”, which is more likely to gain planning approval than a new house (which is really what it is).
    There’s a substantial market in the US for barn lumber and even whole barns/cabins that are dismantled and moved somewhere coastal. But the supply is so large in the US - average farms have increased by 10x or more in acreage in the upper Midwest, mostly in the past 4 decades - that there’s plenty moldering away.

    also note North Dakota/South Dakota saw an influx of inter us immigrants circa 1917-18 as anti-German sentiment brewed elsewhere; communities formed for security, not prosperity
    Last edited by Hugh Conway; 07-25-2021 at 04:55 PM.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    This guy is a state representative in Nebraska, from a western/really rural district. The 'divide' is huge here, and Groene is emblematic of most of what's 'wrong' in our politics. I really wish him out of office - but highly likely they'll elect a doppelganger in his place.

    Groene: The problems with nonpartisan Unicameral | Columnists | nptelegraph.com
    Ihave been asked many times why state Legislatures such as Iowa, Texas, Georgia, Arizona, Oklahoma, Florida, Wyoming, etc., are passing legislation addressing the concerns that a majority of Nebraska’s citizens also share, meanwhile Nebraska’s Legislature is mute on important issues. They want to know why the Legislature has not put a halt to any future attempt to introduce a radical and racist critical race theory from being slipped into school curriculum or why the school health standards are not being tightened up to not allow a liberal State Board of Education commissioner and his activist employees along with a complacent State Board of Education from bringing radical sexual behavior preferences into the classroom. They are curious why election fraud through vote harvesting and voter registration abuses are not being addressed.

    They ask, is not Nebraska still a state where the majority still cherishes liberty, honors the tenets of a just God and defends the family as the cornerstone of a democratic republic? I reply: Yes, easily proven by the election results of who wins statewide and national offices. After all, Trump did receive 58% of the presidential vote in Nebraska. The problem lies in how Nebraska’s unique unicameral form of state government has evolved.

    The nature of Nebraska’s nonpartisan Unicameral is designed to thwart the will of the majority. Today in the Legislature there are 32 registered Republicans and 17 Democrats. Although it is advertised as a nonpartisan body, most Nebraskans vote based on party affiliation, assuming the candidate shares their political views. Without the vetting process of a party primary, candidates can claim they are whatever they want and, when elected, vote who they really are. I will say this: The 17 Democrats are honest, they are who they say they are, and they are true to their party’s positions. Today in the Legislature there are 22 who would be considered conservative and 17 progressive-liberal. There are 10 who I consider Unicameralist; although registered Republicans, they are truly nonpartisan independents. They have the power in the Legislature, unbound by political ideologies or loyalty to the members of a political party who elected them; they are free to roam free from issue to issue. Their swing votes decide who will be committee chairs by enforcing a secret vote on those selections. Unlike in the other 49 states in the union, where the makeup of committees reflects proportionally political ideologies, they enforce what I have called the country club rule; after an election no senator can be removed from a committee, no matter that the people of Nebraska overwhelmingly support one political viewpoint.

    The Unicameralist does not want controversial issues brought out of committee, where they would then have to actually vote and thus show their true colors. They engineer the makeup of committees where the aforementioned issues are assigned — Government, Education, Business and Labor, etc. — so those issues never reach the floor of the Legislature. By using the tools of their trade — vote-trading, Christmas trees (multiple bills combined into one) and compromise — they rule the Unicameral. They throw a bone to the left and the right occasionally to keep the masses at bay, but mostly they focus on expanding government, stronger regulations to protect their trade and making sure someone else pays the taxes to support their agenda. Meanwhile you are sitting at home reading between the lines written by the liberal press, who are protective of the Unicameralist accomplishments, wondering how in God’s name did that bill pass in the Legislature.

    As a Nebraskan you do have one tool to bypass the political distortions of the Unicameralist, the petition process. The Unicameralist, in order to protect their power, has placed burdens on the citizens by enacting higher signature and petitioner requirements. With persistence we have been able to overcome them, and in the last few years the people have spoken on the death penalty and Medicaid expansion. Presently there are two petition drives planned, one legalizing medical marijuana and one requiring citizen identification before voting. I assume both will pass with flying colors.


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  22. #22
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    The sign is the only thing holding the barn together. The owners no doubt don't see the Trump sign next to the farm auction sign in other places.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Political Commentary From Rural North Dakota

    We be riden with Biden!

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