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Thread: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    Do any of you recall, during those first days of boot, if you would prefer not to get inoculated?

    I donít.
    The Algorithm Is Watching

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    1,348

    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    As an ex Canadian vet, we, as you, had NO choice as to whether we got the "shots" or not. Suspect this is the way of the "Mob" world over. Too bad "civvies" don't have that figured out.

    Dumah
    Duct tape can't fix stupid but it will muffle the sound

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    31,366

    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    PREFER not to get inoculated? What branch were you in again?

    We all came out of a coma, lying on the barracks floor in a of pool sweat a couple of hours after the cholera shot.

    Malaria pills gave everyone the squirts but everyone took them.

    PS - Never got cholera or malaria.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    I am with John on this but I did do the Malaria thing.
    "para todo mal, mezcal, y para todo bien tambiťn" (for everything bad, mezcal, and for everything good, as well.)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    And we got shots with the air powered guns that seemed to never get cleaned. Line up in a circle, first man gets an "X" marked on his arm. Walk around in the circle. When the "X" man came around, the injection was changed for the next disease. So it went till you got all of your shots. "Wait Sarge...I don't want that one!!!"
    \"Of all the things I\'ve lost, I miss my mind the most.\"

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    Don't loose your yellow card.
    Disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business.
    TOM ROBBINS, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues



  7. #7
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    Ha!

    My Dad's diary (he had to keep) in the RAF upon joining, in the mid-fifties. 'Doctor told us we'd have little reaction, perhaps no more than a sore arm, to the shots they arranged for us. The following day we were all looking at each other's golf-ball-sized lumps."

    Andy. ...It didn't kill 'im.
    "In case of fire ring Fellside 75..."

  8. #8
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    No choice. We were lined up for uniform distribution and they gave us shots on the way in. They didn't tell us what we were getting, just roll up your sleeve.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    The C.O.'s went to Canadia and the Caribbean.
    We thought they objected to the war...or the vax'ez?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Indian Land, SC, USA
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    Default Re: To all the American military vets of the VietNam Era.

    Good grief, we got so many injections that we figured they might be 'placeholders' for yet-to-be-discovered diseases / viruses !!!! Re: injections with the air gun, you could tell who flinched - if the wound was vertical, it was the corpsman thinking he (at that time, almost always he) was John Wayne, if the wound was horizontal, the odds were good that the recruit flinched Those guns were efficient, could be nasty. As an aside, one of my first tasks in recruit training was to clean literally hundreds of small glass test tubes after they had been used for blood tests
    Last edited by hawkeye54; 07-25-2021 at 12:54 AM.

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