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Thread: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

  1. #1
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    Default Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    So, here's the situation.

    Years ago I made a 12 foot junk rig skiff, that ended up rotting on the patio before getting more than 5 trips out.

    Now, I have a 10 foot skiff with a balanced lug, about to take its first voyage.

    Problem is, I can't get my lazyjacks to stop tangling the yard, either raising or lowering.

    I try to keep things nice and foolproof, so the lazyjacks have one line running between two eyelet screws on the fore and aft of the mast, with bowlines at each end for the legs to run as one continuous loop.

    Any help for a novice is much appreciated, so much of what I have found online seems to assume I already know what I'm doing.
    Here's the boat so far-
    https://ibb.co/C7vMghM

    And here is the lazy jack configuration, that I pulled off after complete spaghettification.
    https://ibb.co/74PQT38

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    Dispense with the lazy jacks for now. Simplicity is our friend.
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    Why not just dispense with the lazyjacks. The sail looks as if it would be manageable without them.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    My understanding was that the jacks were needed to keep the sail and boom from dropping onto the gunwales (or passenger heads.)

    Without them, do you just lower the thing slowly and toss it into the cockpit?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainSkelly View Post
    My understanding was that the jacks were needed to keep the sail and boom from dropping onto the gunwales (or passenger heads.)

    Without them, do you just lower the thing slowly and toss it into the cockpit?
    Yep - or drop it quickly and toss it inboard
    Seems counter intuitive to have a rig whose most desirable quality is simplicity, and then complicate it with lazyjacks.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    Belated link to a good discussion of the subject.
    Taming the Balanced Lug Yard (woodenboat.com)
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
    ♦ The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it
    ♦ If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear
    ♦ George Orwell

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    A topping lift will stop the boom dropping in the boat, a lot less string to tangle up than lazy jacks..
    Just an amateur bodging away..

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    A 10' punt does not need lazy jacks and hardly needs a topping lift.

    Are your passengers armless? Can they not guide the rig into the boat?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    Armless? Legless? There has to bad joke somewhere in this mess.
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
    ♦ The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it
    ♦ If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear
    ♦ George Orwell

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    I'm having a hard time visualizing more than two people in a 10' dinghy under sail, so "passengers" just doesn't grok.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Simplicity defied- an armchair pirate troubleshoots his dinghy.

    Any help for a novice is much appreciated, so much of what I have found online seems to assume I already know what I'm doing.
    Here's the boat so far-
    https://ibb.co/C7vMghM

    And here is the lazy jack configuration, that I pulled off after complete spaghettification.
    https://ibb.co/74PQT38
    Well, about little lug rigs generally ...

    The Oz Goose material is excellent and very well described, though it's also intended for tuning up to race. It is true that the most important part of the lug rig is a purchase on the boom downhaul, 2:1 being minimal. You want to keep the luff tight. At the least just loop that line over the boom a couple times.

    To help control a yard: You need a yard parrel (loop of line that goes from the yard, around the mast opposite the yard, back to the yard. It can be a simple loop, or it can be running rigging to adjust the position of the yard. Start with the simple loop). I've typically run the halyard inside the parrel, Chinese-style, on the opposite side of the mast from the sail itself.

    The yard will tend to drop butt first. Usually, you just grab the end with such a small sail.

    Although I've never seen it tried, you could run a jackline to the aft end of the yard. While sailing, the line is loose. When you begin to lower the sail, you also pull on the jackline to keep the yard's aft end lifted. The jackline would most likely run to the masthead on the opposite side of the halyard. Note that this doesn't affect the bunt of the sail as it comes down.

    A halyard rigging scheme I've tested and works well for lugsails was suggested by Conor O'Brien in his book "Sea-Boats, Oars and Sails." See this extract - http://thecheappages.com/boat/cob/COB_sea-boat.html

    It takes two single blocks and a little bit of low-stretch line, plus whatever block or dumb sheave you've used at the masthead. This doesn't necessarily make it simpler to control the aft end of a yard, but it does assist in setting the sail well.

    Check out the canoe rigging materials at the Cheap Pages for more about small lugsails. Just about every variation has been tried at one time or another.

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