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Thread: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

  1. #1
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    Default Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    I inherited tools from, amongst others, my father who in his younger days was a 1st class mechanic who built the 1948 AGP winner. I'd never heard of a 'thread chaser' till I needed one and, lo and behold, in a box of tools of unknown usage I find a thread chaser (after enquiring of youtube what it looked like of course). Whether the thread left on the rods I am attempting to reinstate is yet to be determined.

  2. #2
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    Default Re: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    Cool! Always good to have one on hand. Be careful to match the thread pitch on the screw and beware of anything that might have Whitworth threads! Is yours Imperial of Metric?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    It's the ironwork on metal parts of an old dray likely to have been made by a blacksmith any time between 1900 and 1930.
    I am building a new dray from the old metal parts, photographs and the rotten remnants of the old woodwork salvaged from the scrap metal pile for the tip. The measurements were of course Imperial, but the ols black Iron nuts have long rusted away and part of the rosd as well. I may yet have to weld new threaded rod to the old to enable the rebuild. All the new bolts will be of course galvanised metric, and painted with pitch before installation because the location of the Dray will be on an island in a salt water bay.
    This is the dray some nearly 50 years ago. I have found 'new' wheels in usable condition.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    Very cool! Looks like a worthy project Going to a museum or historic working farm?

  5. #5
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    Default Re: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    It's the ironwork on metal parts of an old dray likely to have been made by a blacksmith any time between 1900 and 1930.
    I am building a new dray from the old metal parts, photographs and the rotten remnants of the old woodwork salvaged from the scrap metal pile for the tip. The measurements were of course Imperial, but the ols black Iron nuts have long rusted away and part of the rosd as well. I may yet have to weld new threaded rod to the old to enable the rebuild. All the new bolts will be of course galvanised metric, and painted with pitch before installation because the location of the Dray will be on an island in a salt water bay.
    This is the dray some nearly 50 years ago. I have found 'new' wheels in usable condition.
    Technically that is a tipping cart. Drays have 4 wheels.
    Be very careful welding new steel to old iron. Unless you can faggot weld. Arc welding can fail as it melts the slag out of the wrought iron, which re-solidifies as inclusions in the weld.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    On reflection I doubt there's enough thread left and I might be better off starting again. I'll have to buy a suitable sized metric tap and die and that will make buying suitable nuts easier. I will consult on Friday when I am next where the parts are.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
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    Default Re: Ahoy you engineers, thread chasers.

    Great project. Please let us see the details.
    But wouldn't making wheels add to your skills list?
    I actually thought about it when seeing some old cafts, wagons, etc with mostly rotten wheels.
    No one was interested in talking about it or replacing the wheels.
    The heavily antiqued look you know,.

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