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Thread: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    I am living vicariously in two places right now. This thread, and "Ocean Crossing Wayfarer". Both are transporting but on the balance I think I'd rather be on Julia than Wanderer.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I am living vicariously in two places right now. This thread, and "Ocean Crossing Wayfarer". Both are transporting but on the balance I think I'd rather be on Julia than Wanderer.
    Have you gotten to the multiple knockdowns in Force 10 gales yet? That kind of put me off the idea of sailing a Wayfarer as ambitiously as Frank Dye did.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Have you gotten to the multiple knockdowns in Force 10 gales yet? That kind of put me off the idea of sailing a Wayfarer as ambitiously as Frank Dye did.

    Tom
    Not yet, but the endless accounts of being seasick while keeping 1-hour watches in the dark have done that just fine. I am in awe of his stamina, determination and skill, and have zero desire to emulate it!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #109
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Ottawa, Canada
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    529

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    It's been almost a month since the last post. How long do you figure until they make landfall in Hawaii ?

    Cheers,
    Mark

  5. #110
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Well Jonathan has been posting today so they must be somewhere with internet...
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  6. #111
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    Jun 2004
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    Tacoma, WA
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    1,009

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Posting what, where?
    Chuck Hancock

  7. #112
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    Aug 2010
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    Belgium
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    162

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Here…

  8. #113
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    Mar 2011
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    3,506

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Ha, busted.

    We're in Mexico! Soaking up a bit of internet before going back into the wilds of the pacific coast of Baja. It's 84F and sunny in Ensenada today. Feels amazing to be here, morale was sagging a bit feeling trapped in socal. But we are back on the move, eating cheap tacos and practicing Spanish. Living the dream, really.

    Whit is touching up some varnish on the mast while I lounge in the shade.


  9. #114
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Awesome! It's low 50s and rainy here in the PNW. Plus intermittent gales and small craft advisories with a predicted "atmospheric river" on top of everything. So I hope you are reading the weather reports and feeling smug. It would be well deserved.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #115
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    Mar 2011
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Due to hurricane season in Baja, most boats elect not to enter Mexican waters until November, but the need to be out of PNW waters by the first winter storms in late Sept mean that there is a need to linger for a while in southern california. If you can afford and tolerate time in one of the many marinas, it is easily solved. But if you prefer to anchor out on a budget things are a bit difficult.

    We stayed at Marina Del Rey for a few days at the city dock, 5 day limit- no anchoring allowed. Then made an emergency stop in Redondo Beach when the engine started jumping around. Free anchorage is available there for a handful of boats with a permit from the harbor- limit 72 hours. Engine re-mounted to the boat we carried on to Catalina Island. Like the other channel islands, it is lovely- but much more populated and with less dramatic scenery.



    Emerald Cove has good snorkeling and hiking, and we mostly had it to ourselves when the weekend crowd left. It is getting to be late season here. The moorings are uncomfortably expensive, about $50/night. We anchored as much as possible, but got scared by a predicted Santa Ana wind that never materialized and took shelter behind that little rock.





    We eventually made our way to Avalon, which is a cute little town with a public library that will let you use their printer to get your Mexico documentation in order. I can't imagine how scary the maneuvering is in the mooring field when every spot is full and an afternoon wind picks up. They are all bow and stern moorings, not always aligned with the wind.


    Eventually we headed back to Long Beach, where the only anchoring is from Friday-Sunday offshore behind an oil drilling island. The Long Beach marina will not reserve you a slip (and you have to have a reservation) until you send them photos of your ID, boat documentation, full insurance disclosures, and signed contract forms. Then you will be allowed to pay, and get a slip assigned. Only during business hours- oh and no wooden boats allowed.

    Alamitos is in Long beach as well, they have all the same documentation requirements, but forgot to exclude wooden boats because they have never actually seen one.

    Contrast this to any other place on the west coast where they are trilled to have you arrive, if you show up on the weekend just grab a spot not occupied by fishing boats and pay in a day or two when the harbor master comes by. In Eureka the city harbor even told us to just leave any shopping carts we use in the parking lot and they would return them to the stores for us- all for a fraction of the cost.

    I spent a week in Alamitos installing a used roller furler that I bought on craigslist. By the way any repair work on your boat will get your vessel impounded. So I tried to be discreet. I guess you're supposed to haul out for any maintenance that may be needed after the thousand mile trip down the coast.

    The roller furler was a hard decision that I am now very happy with. The dyarchy stay on a track worked great in sheltered waters, and would have worked offshore as well except that the jib is so massive for the boat that I really couldn't pull it in and out on the track in a wind. I spent too much time out on the bowsprit in large seas tying it down, and maybe worse- putting the sun cover bag on took so much work that I often didn't set the jib because it was so nicely stowed in its bag.

    I thought it was going to look horrible, but actually I don't mind it. Setting and dousing the sail from the cockpit is sure nice, and I now have the ability to reef when charging upwind to keep the waves out of the sail.



    The in-process photos were lost in a device-failure, but cutting the full luff tape and hanks off the jib was quite the scary moment of no return. I installed a new headstay (wire) and the furler in a day, modified the luff of the sail to work in another day, and sewed the UV cover on over the third and fourth days. The UV cover was by far the most difficult part, keeping it flat on the sail while passing the whole thing through the little sailrite machine on the dock. There may be a few little bubbles still, but I think they will stretch out with use.

    Last edited by J.Madison; 11-13-2021 at 03:19 PM.

  11. #116
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    The new hobby in Long Beach is strapping a boom box to your paddle board and paddling down the fairway at all hours of the day or night blasting music. Bicycles do the same thing on land. I think headphones might be out of style. We did witness a boat fire, luckily put out before spreading.



    Finally our projects were done and we headed out through the massive backlog of ships. Pretty wild seeing cargo ships anchored all the way to the horizon.



    We headed to Newport, which is a very wealthy and very protected harbor. A random medium sized house on the waterfront we looked at was listed for $14M, and there were thousands of them lining the shore. This fellow passed us very close in the bay, yes those are fake smokestacks and a fake paddle wheel. Anchorage limit is 72 hours and you cannot leave your boat for more than 3 hours, if you can find a place to land. Another boat returned 4 hours after leaving and found the harbor cops tied up to his boat trying to figure out how to raise the anchor to impound it.

    Off to Dana Point, which I liked a lot. It felt like a more welcoming place, because the mansions are on cliffs above the harbor rather than lining the shore. We came in late and anchored without a permit after getting no response on VHF. Perfect. We were out before first light anyway. Unfortunately the recreation of Henry Dana's ship was not in the harbor at that time.

    Next stop was Mission Bay, which is the north end of San Diego. Anchorage limit is 72 hours, and the harbor is a long way from services. But we caught the bus into town, rented a truck from Home Depot, and went out to a specialty lumber store for some doug fir and marine plywood. I figured good boat wood might be hard to find in Mexico. The ply is for a little project, building a servo pendulum windvane, and the fir is mostly earmarked for a few more floor timbers or whatever else comes up first. We tied up next to Patience in Avalon, a Westsail. He had 50,000 miles on the boat on his home-made windvane. I borrowed the book he had on board and snapped pics of a few relevant pages. We'll see how it goes. Mine will be all wood.



    A big sport fishing boat followed us into Mission Bay. Lots of those here, and very few commercial fishing boats.



    After our time expired in Mission Bay, we headed to San Diego proper, the last stop before entering Mexico. The guide books mentioned a special anchorage for cruisers, and multiple other anchorages in the bay as well. So we headed in a few hours before sunset and anchored up in a nice spot surrounded by boats we knew from the trip down. I then rowed over to get the details on obtaining the anchorage permit. Boy had we screwed up....

    One does not simply arrive in San Diego and anchor. A permit must be obtained in advance, this can only be done via email and is forbidden from being done the same day. Before you get the permit (in advance) you must submit to a vessel inspection by the police at their dock. This cannot be done if there is not an available anchor permit open, even though you can't take the spot that day. We called the harbor police after learning a bit about the process and they said to come over for an inspection, so we motored several miles away. Then they refused to do the inspection and transferred me to the moorings people, who said that there was no anchorage available anywhere and he didn't know what we should do that night. This is in one of the greatest natural harbors in the world, where there is protected anchorage for literally thousands of boats. They have 20 permits, and they were all taken.

    We ended up paying for a marina spot for a few days, hoping to at least get a shower out of it. But the shower had been used by homeless people so the city capped the nozzle and locked it up indefinitely. I was becoming a bit disillusioned with the region. The idea seems to be to make life so difficult for the fleet of live-aboard anchor-outs that they all give up and move under a bridge somewhere. Cruisers have been swept up as collateral damage. Frankly I found the pirate fleet to be quite friendly, helpful, and skillful in boat handling. In fact it didn't seem like there was much difference between us, at least in the eyes of the cities of southern california. At this point we could not get to Mexico fast enough.

    So we topped up water, fuel, grabbed a couple days worth of groceries and headed out on the overnight 65 nm to Ensenada. Man was I happy to raise the Mexican flag along with our Q flag as the sun rose over the mountains of Baja California. Like San Francisco, it was another of those "I didn't really believe we would actually make it here" moments. We'd just been talking for so long about sailing to Mexico. Granted, there are a lot of miles between us and La Paz, but it still felt like we'd really accomplished something long in the making.

  12. #117
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    Oct 2009
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    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Whew, Congratulations on your sucessful passage through yachtsman babylon...san diego...I recall 4 different police branches "busting"us in the first day there....15 years ago.
    The cervesa after the next may be the best you ever had!
    These next miles too !!!
    great to watch your thing here .merci.

  13. #118
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    Jan 2000
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    Portland, Maine
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    21,954

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Yes, really enjoying following along. Thanks.

  14. #119
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    The photos of Catalina are the only things about your So. Calif. stay that makes me a bit nostalgic. I spent many days aboard my parent's yawl anchored or moored at Catalina. Mostly we visited Emerald Bay but also did some time in Avalon. Cat Harbor is the place to be during a Santa Ana. The rest of SC is as I learned to know it: too many people and too much conservative bureaucracy in many of the coastal cities. You would have fared better in San Pedro I believe. At least, you would have in days past.

    Enjoy Mexico!

    Jeff

  15. #120
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    Sep 2008
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    Victoria, BC, Canada
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Thanks very much for the update, Jon.

    Sounds very much like a lot of the south end of California is a "you can't get there from here" zone for cruising boats.

    Hope Mexico treats you much better.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  16. #121
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Good story, thanks for the posts. ....and I'll hesitate in the future to claim that the anchoring regs around Nantucket Sound are the worst.
    -Dave

  17. #122
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    May 2002
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    Gone West!
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    1,422

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post

    ... All along, we have focused solely on getting to San Francisco. We felt that if only we could make it this far, we would be able to do whatever comes next.

    Now, we are setting our sights farther south, hoping for a pleasant winter in Mexico. Just taking it one step at a time.
    You all are taking this leisure in a warm clime seriously. Thanks for taking us along.

  18. #123
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    May 2006
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    Ballard
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    8,670

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    Nice job all around.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  19. #124
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Canberra, Australia
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    165

    Default Re: Cruise of the Ketch Julia

    I thought boating bureaucracy in this country was bad. The US sounds truly unhinged.
    Sailing - the fine art of getting wet and becoming ill while slowly going nowhere at great expense.

    - Henry Beard

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