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Thread: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Epoxy primed inside the foils where the spar would sit and the trailing edge and coated the spars on all sides.
    Applied thickened epoxy to the spars and trailing edge and folded them down on themselves.

    The rudders blanks look near perfect but I struggled a bit with the longer one. Top and bottom skins not wanting to curve simetricaly and the middle of the leading edge was bowing opposite as the ends. After loosening the clamps and forcing into shape with one of the beams and retightening the clamps it is okish..... Will see if it springs out of shape once the epoxy is cured or if it is happy with it's new shape.

    If I was to do it again I would take the time to build a few ribs. I don't think they are needed for strength but would make bending symmetrically much easier.

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  2. #37
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Busy week, but I have still been doing a little, just nothing interesting to show.

    Wrapped the rudders and board in 6oz woven.
    Got 6oz biax on the 3rd face of the beams. Already got 12oz on the tops and bottoms and so just one more side face left to do in 6oz.

    Wife helped with mixing again and holding the foils for me to keep them from swinging.

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  3. #38
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Got the last side of the beams glassed.
    Finished sanding down the tape edges on the hulls, one last night one night before.
    Laid 6oz cloth over the bottoms of the first hull up to the deck corner.
    Not sure if it's a good idea or bad, theoretically it might be weaker, but not sure in reality.... I filled all the weave and the sanded edges (basically entire surface) with epoxy thickened with the light weight filler/fairing compound. I would have done wood flour but it doesn't squeegy out as smooth for applying glass over wet. With the fairing compound squeegeed out as thin as I could scrape it, I rolled a coat of epoxy and then laid the cloth, it seems pretty smooth, will see today after it's cured and I'm less tired.... But I think cosmeticly it worked great.

    (I have been using wood flour wet under the biax tapes on the beams, but the biax allows inconsistencies to squirt through the fibers where woven kind of traps stuff (epoxy, air, debris, etc....) Underneath in ugly bubbles)

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  4. #39
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Family visiting for 2 weeks so not sure how much progress I will make .....

    Last night I sanded, filled and applied the overlapping layer of 6oz woven over the top decks.

    I really need to spend a weekend cleaning out the tent, kind of let it go when it was so muddy have a new tarp for the floor ordered so at some point will drag everything and the table out and try to level off all the mudholes I made walking around in the soup that have solidified now.

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  5. #40
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Visiting family is gone. Back to work on the canoe

    Applied a coat of fairing to all 4 sides of the beams and all but the top decks of the outriggers.

    I had been planning to build sockets on the outriggers to bolt the beams to, but came to an appiphany laying in bed last night...... I don't need to break it down for anything, there aren't roads or width restrictions here..... I'll just be carting it down to the water so no need to overly complicated things. I can just attach the beams and outriggers solidly together. Fewer weak points to break that way

    Built a crude jig for the table saw to cut the groove in the mast and boom. It worked 'okish'...... Blade is thinner than I needed the groove so attempted to have the jig slightly off center and pulled the mast through both directions. There was enough play in the jig I still had narrow spots I needed to enlarge with a combination of vibrating multitool saw and sandpaper wrapped around a butter knife.

    Glassed the inside faces of my rudder and leeboard boxes.

    The bolt rope of the luff slid through well and I think fits great. The plastic slug at the clew also fit great on the boom. However there are slugs at the head and tack that have a shorter length neck? (Standoff between the slug and attachment that fits through the slot in the track) they bind up as the combined width of the PEX, wood, and fiberglass are just barely too thick.

    I could sand that down some, but would loose the glass which gives the track strength and retains the PEX... So I don't want to do that. Would it be easy to get slugs like the one on the clew to replace the ones at the head and tack? Or is there a good reason for them being different? If it is ok to do that, would it also be practical to install them along the entire leading edge to use instead of the bolt rope? It fits and slides fine, but there is some friction when the entire sail is in the track.... It works fine, but would hate for it to bind at an inopertune time......

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    Last edited by narfiwillem; 06-21-2021 at 09:43 AM.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Chopping into a perfectly good mast slot to accommodate an old sail made for a different boat doesn't make much sense. I'd cut those headboard slugs off and attach different ones. They can be attached by drilling a small hole through the headboards (slightly behind the place where the current slugs are) and using small stainless shackles to attach new slugs. Places like Sailrite have a variety of slug styles available.

    The first thing to do on the boltrope is to rub it down with paraffin, which will seriously reduce friction. There are also some sprays available for the job, though on a wooden boat with painted or varnished surfaces you want to avoid the use of any products containing silicone. Incidental contact with other parts of the boat can make for nasty paint adhesion problems if you ever need to do some touch-up painting.

    If you wanted to add slugs to the entire luff the easiest would be to use Kiwi-slides, sewn on over the boltrope, or slugs with the little plastic shackles which pop over the boltrope and are held in position by a single small screw through the sail's Dacron luff tape. For small boats they tend to be plenty strong enough.

    The thing that is absolutely critical when converting from a boltrope to slugs or slides is maintaining the original luff shape. If the slug installation is going to move the sail back from the mast a little bit, it needs to move the entire luff, from the headboard down to the tack fitting, the same consistent amount back from the mast. You do not want to screw this up as it can make drastic unwanted changes in your sail's draft, shape, and/or how well it sets.

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  7. #42
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    I'd cut those headboard slugs off and attach different ones. They can be attached by drilling a small hole through the headboards (slightly behind the place where the current slugs are) and using small stainless shackles to attach new slugs. Places like Sailrite have a variety of slug styles available.

    The first thing to do on the boltrope is to rub it down with paraffin, which will seriously reduce friction. There are also some sprays available for the job, though on a wooden boat with painted or varnished surfaces you want to avoid the use of any products containing silicone. Incidental contact with other parts of the boat can make for nasty paint adhesion problems if you ever need to do some touch-up painting.
    Good advice as always, thanks.
    I will look into replacing the headboard slug and the tack, I was worried it would be difficult to replace the one at the headboard, but your suggesion is simple and easy. I will make sure to keep the same distance so the shape stays the same.

    I didn't have much time last night, but closed in the rudder and leeboard boxes, well I say 'closed in' loosely since there is just the two sides connected by the block in the front of each one. I am hoping that the hinge pin in the center will be enough to keep them from flexing too much, to be honest, I suspect they are a bit of overkill, but after seeing Lee.007s issues with his rudders and board, I want to errror on the side of caution. (forgot to take any pictures)

    Thinking about rigging and routing and all that entails..........

    I have reinforced areas for the chainplates on the outriggers already and will make a bracket about 3/4 of the way up the mast that they will go to as well as the forstay. I had originally planned to attach the forestay to the front of the canoe, however as I think I have managed to get everything else attached to the outriggers and beams, in the spirit of a 'convertable canoe' that literaly just bolts on and goes, I think I will make a bridal between the front of the two outriggers to attach the forestay to as well. I just need to figure out a good method of attachement and how high the 'Y' should be.

    I bought a variaty of pulleys and need to figure out what I need where for everything else still

    Top of the mast, I will build an aluminum bracket housing two pulleys transitioning from up inside the mast to down the back of it. I only need one for the halyard, but figured another would be convenient for flags or if something goes wrong with the first one.
    Bottom of the mast..... Still not sure how to transition the lines from inside to outside for the most practical ease of use. My two ideas are pullyes at the bottom out each side comming up to cleats, or angled holes in the side of the mast on each side just above head height comming down to cleats. I would insert pex tubes 5-6 inches inside the mast directing up and a couple inches on the outside directing down and reinforced with multiple layers of fiberglass. So I guess my question is this, is it better to pull down, or to pull up, or is there a better more standardized way of doing this?

    Gooseneck, I haven't built it yet, but have a fairly good idea of what I need. A universal joint that connects the boom to the mast track and has a method of attaching to the sail and the downhaul. I understand the need for the pivot up and down and side to side, but is there any need for the boom to twist as well? I know some use a pin, but it would be simpler I think to use straps around the boom to attach it. I can still make it swivel if it needs to twist, but don't want to make it more complex than I need to.

    Downhaul, how much leverage do I need? I got 2 of these very cheap, https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 not sure if it is a good idea or not....

    Outhaul, routing.... leverage needed? pulley at each end of the boom with the line running inside and then pulled back on the outside to a cleat on the side of the boom?

    Sheet and traveler system..... of everything, this seems to need to be the most ergonomic, and with no experience I am clueless..... still thinking about it and reading what I can find.

    Rudders.... 3 lines to each going to pulleys on the back side of the rear beam, 1 intertie to the other rudder, 1 control, and 1 retract, they will be spring or bungee down. Need to figure out a tiller system mounted on the rear beam that the control lines come to from each rudder.

    Leeboard, 1 retract line and will be spring or bungee down.

    As you can see, lots rattleing around in my mind, just not much knowledge or experience.... Makes for a fun adventure

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Downhaul- Would only be used (needed) if the gooseneck is free to slide up and down the mast. For both a downhaul and the outhaul on a small boat like that there is no reason to go nuts with mechanical advantage. For example, this is the stock sliding gooseneck in the mast slot on a Hobie 14 catamaran. The downhaul is made fast to a small horn cleat on the mast below the boom. It then runs up through a little swiveling block on the bottom of the gooseneck, then back down to the cleat where it is cleated off. It works perfectly fine in a situation where it will likely get more stress than your system will.
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    Most of us mess with outhaul tension while sailing a lot less than maybe we originally thought we would (bordering on close to never). As long as you can pull out any wrinkles along the foot edge, you are probably OK to basically set it and forget it. With a small fairlead or block attached on top of the aft end of the boom, one of the easiest ways to set it up is to tie a line to the clew ring, send it out to the boom's end, through the block or fairlead and then back to a clam cleat attached to the side of the boom, far enough forward that the skipper can reach it to adjust it. Invariably, the dangling excess gets annoying and gets tied up around the cleat (probably one of the main reasons that we don't mess with outhaul tension - because we would need to untie and then re-tie the excess). In any case, you won't need much leverage or anything fancy, you probably won't be adjusting it much, and you will still do just fine.

    A boom which can twist at the gooseneck is not absolutely critical, but if possible it is usually worth doing. It helps to keep the various parts of the sheeting system aligned better with the forces put on them, so it may be worth figuring out some sort of small universal joint to incorporate into the gooseneck.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Finally something fun to show.

    I sanded the fairing material off of the beams and the outrigger hulls yesterday. Still some weave visible but keep trying to remind myself it's an experiment and I can't waste time making it pretty.

    Spent some time squaring and leveling. All four peices are level and it's identical distance from each bow to outside corner of the opposite transom. Wife helped me with the leveling and squaring as well as turning the beams over to apply a coat of epoxy and then thickened epoxy before lifting them back into place.

    I am pretty happy with it, however it is a huge footprint, probably won't get it back in the tent now.... How long can I keep it outside in the weak Alaska UV before it causes issues with the epoxy? Am I good for a couple of weeks before painting as I finish up all the boys and peices or will I need to be tarping it daily between projects?

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  10. #45
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Tabbed the beams in with 12oz biax.

    Cut the rudders down and formed solid end caps for the first one.

    Traced the end on a solid block then cut it out on the band saw, then freehand shaped the end with a combination of the belt sander and RO sander.

    Need to do one more set for the other rudder as well as the leeboard.

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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by "friend on another forum"
    You have gone crazy and I love it! Can't wait to see it all together and functional.
    Well it's kind of fun, I usually don't know what the heck I'm doing but somehow it always ends up ok.....

    I think there is a quote out there somewhere about angels guarding idiots..... I might be proof if that.

    Finished cutting the end peices and shaping them and glued them on. Held in place with plastic tape and a strip of duct tape over it all. I forgot to mark the spars before closing them up..... Think I'll hinge the rudders through the end caps but was planning to hinge the leeboard through the spar.... I think I can guess close enough though.

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  12. #47
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Last piece of the sectional couch came in so got the legs on it and in place. I'm happy with it and wife is happy so all is good!!

    Sanded the excess glue off the rudder and board cap ends and glassed them on with 2 layers of 6oz woven. Will still need to give the corners some glass and attention.

    Loosely set the canoe into place under the beams to look and think. Will block the canoe roughly 2 inches under the beams which will make the "V" of the outriggers just slightly above the bottom of the canoe.



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  13. #48
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Sanded down the edges of the glass over the rudder and board caps.

    Drilled pivot holes in the rudders, board and cases.
    Had worried I didn't mark the spar on the board before capping it in. But realized I had the bits I trimmed off so it was a non issue, I just laid the scrap against it to see where the spar was for drilling the pivot hole.

    I messed up making the case for the board and the front spacer is full height but it needs a gap for the board to pivot through, so I'll need to trim a bit of that out.

    Still not sure on hinges for between the rudder cases and transoms. Maybe glass in some PEX just like I did on the mast... Still thinking about it, but need to start doing something.......

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  14. #49
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Over drilled all the holes in the boards and cases and filled with thickened epoxy.
    Made sample hinges to see how they would work. PEX glassed on the end of some scrap plywood, will grind out sections so they fit together and see how they hinge with a pin.
    Cut and glued together the blocks and brackets for attaching the beams to the canoe rubrail.

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  15. #50
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Rough cut the sample hinge. Even though It wasn't straight when glassed to the plywood (it's a coiled price of PEX I just straightened by hand) it seemed to work well enough to persue with more care.

    Shoved a steel rod through a length to keep it straight and glassed it to a peice of plywood with 2x layers of 6oz woven, it looks pretty clean I think and should work well.

    Glued the blocks and brackets to the beams for attaching the canoe.

    Used some left over epoxy to glass some of the rudder and board corners with scraps of 6oz woven.

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  16. #51
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Drilled the mounting holes in the attach brackets and canoe rubrails.

    Took the canoe off and flipped the outriggers.

    Sanded off excess glue around attach brackets and beam to hull connection.

    Filled all those joints with thickened epoxy fillets and glassed with 2x layers of 6oz woven. I suspect it would have been quicker and easier to just use 12oz biax but I was hoping for a cleaner less sanding needed finish. Instead got lots of glass hairs balled up everywhere and always working against the clock with epoxy gelling. Still not too bad, it will work

    Forgot to take a picture but also glassed up the second chunk of hinge stock. Each peice is enough for 2x hinge halves so the 2 will be enough for all 4 halves needed to attach both rudders.

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  17. #52
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Hey Narfi!

    I have been busy with a million things and havent gotten to check out your thread in a long time. Looks like she is really taking shape. I was going to comment on your hinges.

    I started out with eye bolts and a hitch pin, but the eyebolts kept bending and breaking with just my 60 sq foot laser sail. I finally ordered some gudgeons from duckworks boat supply. I got the ones designed for a kayak, but they have all kinds and sizes. Just letting you know in case your hinges give you issues. I am not suggesting that they will, but thought I would warn you about the forces applied to the rudder hinge. I had no idea how much force there was on the rudder. I was using 5/16" diameter stainless steel, and it snapped it right off going downwind in only about a 5 knot wind. Granted, it had probably weakened over time, but I have only had it out about 8 or 10 times. I have been out twice now with my new gudgeons, and they are rock solid.

    By the way, are you sure you are converting a canoe to a trimaran? Looks like your amas are big enough to stand alone as a catamaran! Cant wait to see some pics of it in the water.
    “If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.”
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  18. #53
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Thanks, I was reading about your hinges and worrying about them.... I hope mine will work but that is some of the fun in experimenting, if they fail, I know the guy to go to for warentee work. One advantage I have is two rudders sharing the loaf instead of one, guess we will see.

    Sanded back the edges of all the glass on the mounting brackets and beam to hull junctions.

    Three coats of graphite and epoxy to the bottoms of the hull roughly 2 hours apart worked well as it was a hot (for Alaska) day, 75f outside and 110f inside the tent, so the epoxy mixed really well and cured quickly. Just had to roll fast.

    Only down side is all the bugs I trapped, but as I keep telling myself, this isn't a project for beauty, it is an experiment in function........

    Cut both sets of rudder hinges and really happy with how they turned out.

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  19. #54
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Dummied up the rudder cases to test the hinge fit and very happy with them. They are just glued on with thickened epoxy right now, still need to glass the hinges securely in place, I made sure to sand back enough relief on the hinges there will still be room for the extra glass.

    Took a couple days off from epoxy and started making aluminum peices.

    Hinging mast step, I had been stressing quiet a bit over how to mount the mast, but this fell together easily and I am pretty happy with it. It will be riveted together with solid countersunk 1/8" rivets.

    Exit blocks for the halyard near the base of the mast.

    Masthead with halyard block.

    All peices made from 1/8" aluminum sheet and extruded aluminum angle. (Stock I have for the plane I am building, glad I bought extra)

    Started making end caps and outhaul blocks for the boom but it was bedtime......

    Still need to finish the end caps and blocks for the boom.
    Need to figure out the shroud/stay attachment to the mast.
    Need to cut the chain plates for the shrouds as well as the ones at the bows for the bridal to the forestay.

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  20. #55
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Hey Narfi, your hinges make me nervous. Oh yeah, my rudder broke right off yesterday. Snapped off just below the tiller head. Don't do what I did. Make a solid wood rudder. I am having to redesign mine now. Others with more experience than me might chime in about your hinges, but I am nervous about the fact that the only thing really holding them together is epoxy and fiberglass. I was using 4oz fiberglass with two coats of epoxy on my rudder and it snapped right off like a tooth pick when I was sailing upwind at about 6.5 miles per hour yesterday.

    I am jealous of your machining resources. I can tell you have much more than just a Harbor Freight drill press from the work you are showing in the post above.
    “If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.”
    “You’re never beaten until you admit it.”
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  21. #56
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    If you ever get really bored, I have seen some stripper canoe hulls where they used the graphite mix below the waterline and it had been sanded smooth (most likely about 320 grit wet-sanded as the final go-round). Unlike the glossy black and slightly lumpy surface that most graphite provides, it yields a smooth satin dark grey finish that is absolutely gorgeous.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    I'm perpetually in awe of your energy, ability and drive, Narfi! Work is looking great, cant wait to see it in action.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by VT_Jeff View Post
    I'm perpetually in awe of your energy, ability and drive, Narfi! Work is looking great, cant wait to see it in action.
    I can't wait either but life has been busy.
    This was going to be my week to push hard on it but already clocked 25+hrs at work this week so not much time for hobbies.

    I know nothing about rope and been struggling with some I bought off Amazon I was planning to use for the shrouds.

    It is,
    Mastrant MM03100 Mastrant-M 3mm (1/8") Double Braided Guying Rope, 100 Meters Long

    Super tight braid around a straight white stranded/filimented? core.

    I have cut off a few pieces to experiment with and only real success has been to swedge an eye into it with a nicopress tool. The braid is soooo tight I can't bury any tail in it. I tried removing the core from a length and even with the core removed and the tail tapered by pulling strands out and cutting them off I can't get it inside itself.

    The only thing I have managed to do is get it to cross through which I was able to barely do with the core still in place.

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    I don't have the proper tools, but using a dental pick and a kinked over peice of .025 stainless safety wire seemed to give me as much leverage as anything could. I can get the folded over wire snaked through the rope IF I remove the core first, but with the core in place it is impossible to even push it through.

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    Thoughts?

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Haven't been progressing as fast as I would like, but still getting a little bit done each day.

    Here is the leeboard case attached to the beam with 2 layers of 12oz tape along each side and the bottom. Clamp was in the way on top but it's a more awkward spot that won't get a lot of reinforcement, but will try to get a little on it tonight.

    The dream is to prime and paint this weekend for the hulls and mast and boom. Not sure if I'll achieve it or not. That will give me a little more space in the tent to finish up all the smaller parts.

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    Someone showed me an unfinished Marples 38ft trimaran on marketplace, all 3 hulls done, attached and painted outside, said the rudders and board still need to be made. But no pictures of inside leaves me guessing a lot of time and money still in finishing needed. (Not to mention getting it here o.0 )

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Perfect conditions for outside painting this weekend. 75f+ outside and 105f in the tent. Slight breeze to keep the bugs away but not windy enough to mess with the paper.

    Saturday I did final sanding then a good wash down with scotch Brite and acid etch to clean any grease and dust off then started spraying the System Three Yacht primer but didn't thin it enough for the only nozzle size I have on my gun (used to more options at work ) so poured it out in a tray and rolled it. I rolled while my wife brushed the hard to roll spots. Gotta roll with the punches by then the bugs were getting bad and evening was cooling off so called it a night.

    Sunday I raced home after church and rolled on a second coat of primer which cured pretty quickly using the spit on your finger and rub it on the primer to see if you can soften up and run any off. It was good enough to start spraying off white awlgrip by 4pm and had second coat finished before 6.

    At the same time touched up the mounting holes and scratched up rubrail of the canoe, and a repair and rubrail skuffs on the FS17.

    Hoping to paint red tonight. It's a bit cloudy this morning so hopefully my painting window will stretch just enough for me to get it done

    Then I need to start cleaning up in the tent, it's getting out of hand and finish up the rudders and leeboard and get them painted as well. Hopefully have the mast up within a couple days and be painting the rest by weeks end. Next weekend is a bit too optimistic to launch but getting close!

    20210718_190628.jpg

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  26. #61
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Pacific drifting
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    537

    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by narfiwillem View Post

    Here is the leeboard case attached to the beam with 2 layers of 12oz tape along each side and the bottom. Clamp was in the way on top but it's a more awkward spot that won't get a lot of reinforcement, but will try to get a little on it tonight.


    20210715_193339.jpg
    Following with interest.

    Just a thought about strengthening your leeboard case to beam attachment ;
    Two simple plywood gussets filleted on either side of the case (see picture ) would strengthen that joint considerably , without a significant weight penalty...
    Leeboard loading can be significant.

  27. #62
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    May 2021
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    Bush Alaska
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    This is not an art project, this is not an art project, this is not an art project....... I have to keep telling myself.

    Rushed home from work and taped off the white and got 2 coats of red sprayed.
    Cleaned the paint gun and took my wife out fishing. Some of you know Im not much of a fisherman but she has been wanting to ever since we finished the fs17 so we got some gear and lisences and tonight caught her first lake trout.

    By the time we got home the paint had cured enough to unwrap the paper and see what it looks like. Lots of bugs, a few runs from the paint, a few runs from the primer, a few runs I hadn't sanded in the epoxy and plenty of places I could have faired more..... But all things considering I think it looks pretty good and matches the canoe really well.

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    20210719_212906.jpg

    20210719_212851.jpg

  28. #63
    Join Date
    May 2021
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by beam reach View Post
    Following with interest.

    Just a thought about strengthening your leeboard case to beam attachment ;
    Two simple plywood gussets filleted on either side of the case (see picture ) would strengthen that joint considerably , without a significant weight penalty...
    Leeboard loading can be significant.
    Thanks! Appreciate the feedback and interest. I had considered something like that but even stouter angled down and up to the aft corners of the case. Ultimately I decided 24oz of glass on 3 sides was enough for the first runs.... And now as you can see I've painted so sticking with it for now.... Time will tell if it was the right choice or not

  29. #64
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    May 2016
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    Pacific drifting
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    537

    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    And it does look rather good , doesn`t it ?

  30. #65
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    May 2021
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    Bush Alaska
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by beam reach View Post
    And it does look rather good , doesn`t it ?
    It doesn't look that good in person :P but I am still happy with it.
    I found the picture of the gussets similar to yours I had considered during the process, the entire boat could have been knocked off and those gussets remained whole :P

    Capture (1).jpg

  31. #66
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    May 2021
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    Bush Alaska
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Last two nights my plan was to put the mast up, but been busy and wife wanted to go out in the boat, it will get there
    Thought I would share my misery this morning, traffic jam during my 15 minute walk to work today I saw 1 other walker and a jogger, no vehicles though :P


    20210723_064017.jpg

    20210723_063239.jpg


    and this is what our bnb guests saw walking a mile or so from our house yesterday,



  32. #67
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    May 2021
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    Bush Alaska
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    101

    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Got the mast up. Not a lot of adjustment on the cheap turn buckles I got....... This is second attempt. First try was close, I calculated the length of the shrouds and hooked them up, left the forestay super long, basically just a rope fory wife to pull on while I lifted, pinned the base hinge and put it up in place. First try was a little to far forward to adjust back with the shroud turn buckles. Screws holding the baseplate to the mast were too short and a couple pulled out from pulling forward too far. We took it down and I put longer screws in. Will see, I may end up needing to reinforce those attachments somehow if I raise and lower it alot.... For now they work well as pins to hold it in place....

    As you can see in the picture it's raked back a little now, this is with the forestay turnbuckle turned down all the way and the shrouds roughly half.... Maybe I can get the front tighter in place tomorrow, or maybe I'll take it down and adjust. Or maybe I'll leave it.... Not sure yet.

    Still need to sand/clean out the track on the boom and get it ready to install.

    Couldn't help ourselves, had to lift the sail and see how it looked. I was super happy with how easily it went up and when done it literally fell back down from its own weight. The diy track and the slugs I installed on the sail seem to work really well together.

    I had originally planned to mount the mast lower in the canoe as well as leave room to upgrade to a larger sail..... Kind of looks funny with so much mast sticking above the sail, but maybe a good excuse to get a flag to fly above it.

    20210723_203231.jpg

  33. #68
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    May 2021
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    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    If you ever get really bored, I have seen some stripper canoe hulls where they used the graphite mix below the waterline and it had been sanded smooth (most likely about 320 grit wet-sanded as the final go-round). Unlike the glossy black and slightly lumpy surface that most graphite provides, it yields a smooth satin dark grey finish that is absolutely gorgeous.
    Hehe, I dont think I will get that bored, but it does sound beautiful.

    Interesting thought, because of your avatar picture on the forum here, I always picture you and your voice as Sam Elliot. I found it even more interesting when I finaly got your book in the mail yesterday and on the back cover it says written and illustrated by Todd Bradshaw with a picture of a young Sam Elliot next to it....

    Your book is great, and the illustrations make it even more so, I wish I had bought it last winter when I started considering this project instead of now when I am nearly finished. I would and will recomend it to anyone interested. It can serve as double duty as a textbook and coffee table centerpeice.

    After reading through it though, I wonder if my project is somewhat of an affront to your idea on asthetics... you have all the classic looks and beauty and I am making a plastic looking shiny non-classic attempt.

    A couple of questions for you. I was planning to do what you call the slave tiller system with the tiller hinged under the rear beam outside of the canoe, but after looking through your book (havent had time to really read it all yet) the rope steering along the gunnels seems a lot more simple and ergonomic. With the double rudders is there any concern with needing more leverage, or is it really as simple as grabbing the rope beside you and tugging fore/aft?

    Designing a rope traveler along the rear beam, should it go full width or is there an ideal width it should be? I imagine the longer it is the more it will 'V' up in the middle, but shortening it would limit how far out it can go.....

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
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    10,232

    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    My experience with dual rudders is limited to Hobie Cats. I was an owner of the 16' and 18' models and also a couple of 14' Hobies and was a dealer for a few years. The rudder heads were connected with a bar and the tiller/hiking stick was on a universal connected at the middle of the bar. The only times I remember the rudder control taking much effort was when a rudder had been partially kicked up and was no longer at its normal and very vertical angle. The difference in feel between normal vertical and maybe 20 degrees off of vertical was pretty surprising. On the other hand, our 20' Farrier trimaran had a single, center mounted rudder and I never felt like I was lacking any steering power. Rope steering might work fine, though I think that I'd rather have some sort of tiller on a quick boat.

    You will probably find that your rudders work just fine. Getting multihulls to tack reasonably efficiently seems to be more a matter of learning just the right procedure for a particular boat than it is something to do with the hardware. It can take an entire season of sailing to nail down the specifics which will eventually keep you from getting stuck. How much speed do you need to carry into a tack? What angle to the wind do you need to enter at? How much and exactly when do you turn the rudder? When do you release and then re-trim the sheet?

    eagle-tri.jpg

    I suspect that there really isn't much reason to go wider than maybe 5'-6' max for a traveler, especially a rope one. The main reason is that multihulls in general don't usually perform particularly well at angles so deeply downwind that you would want to ease the sail out that far. The traveler is allowing you to apply sheet tension more directly downward from the clew corner when the sail is out to the side. This eliminates excessive upper sail twist to leeward and the power loss that it will create. However, once you get to the point where a multihull's mainsail is pretty far out from center, you can probably sheet in a little bit, point up on a course a bit higher and speed up, often a lot - sailing farther, but faster and probably getting to your destination quicker and with more fun.

    Aesthetics? I do appreciate classic wooden boats, but in general I tend to be more oriented to what a boat can do than what it is made from - as long as it is made well.

  35. #70
    Join Date
    May 2021
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    Bush Alaska
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    101

    Default Re: Canoe to Sailing Trimaran conversion

    Boom done, downhaul and outhaul and two halyards set up with cleats to tie to.

    Now that the boom and mast are out of the tent I can clean up a bit and make room to finish the boards and cases. Then rigging them and the traveler and sheet system.

    20210724_180516.jpg

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