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Thread: Interior painting

  1. #1
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    Sep 2020
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    Default Interior painting

    As I get ready for the coming season, there are certain areas of the interior of my Coquina that look like they need repainting. In general, the paint job looks good, but there are certain "squares" defined by the strakes and by the frames that have lifting paint. I figure those need to be scraped and then sanded, then repainted. And I figure that I can do this in a patchwork manner for now. But this is the first time for such a job for me. So what do I need to look out for? Gimme all the details you would give to a wooden boat newbie. If I stick with the Interlux brand, is there a particular paint for interior painting? Thanks in advance.
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    J.D.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Interior painting


    Is that a cracked frame ?
    Anyway, Painting a boat is not a small subject.
    Are these planks ply or timber? Is it an epoxy boat?
    bruce

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Interior painting

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post

    Is that a cracked frame ?
    Anyway, Painting a boat is not a small subject.
    Are these planks ply or timber? Is it an epoxy boat?
    bruce
    Wizbang, I will check on the frame. I don't think so but will compare to the other side. The boat is plywood lapstrake. Epoxy joints between the laps. Mainly what I want to know is: is it reasonable to do a localized scraping and sanding job in the affected areas, or is this something that will require an entire interior repaint? I feel like I have to do something about the raised paint so as to protect the underlying plywood.
    J.D.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Interior painting

    80 grit on a DA and
    A bit of sharp scraping on the loose top coats.
    A coat or 3 of Pre Kote
    A coat or 3 of enamal, either alkyd or urethane
    It looks like the last coats were put on without sanding or good prep.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Interior painting

    Wizbang, what looks like a crack is where the frame meets one of the floors. The same joint is visible on the frame at the top of the picture. Thanks for your feedback.
    J.D.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2000
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    Padanaram, MA USA
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    Default Re: Interior painting

    Pardon my introducing a peripheral question.
    On a lapstrake boat with frames that have triangular gaps between the frames and the strakes, itís next to impossible to adequately prep those surfaces so they donít become rot pockets?
    One defense is to use decay resistant woods like cedar and white oak and worry less about the finish. Another, for glued lap boats is to leave out the frames. A third possibility is to fill the void with some kind of filler.

    Looking at the OPís boat, Iíd hope to have a long range plan in mind.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2005
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    Hills of Vermont, USA
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    Default Re: Interior painting

    An amateur tossing out a thought. I'm wondering if some of the paint didn't stick well because of blushed epoxy that wasn't sanded/washed off? If it were mine, I'd probably sand down to bare wood, scrub with scotchbrite & water, thoroughly dry then prime & paint again. As said - a good enamel should do fine.

    I too wondered about a broken frame, but the floor/frame joint explanation makes sense - harder with pics than in person.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Interior painting

    Quote Originally Posted by JimConlin View Post
    Pardon my introducing a peripheral question.
    On a lapstrake boat with frames that have triangular gaps between the frames and the strakes, itís next to impossible to adequately prep those surfaces so they donít become rot pockets?
    One defense is to use decay resistant woods like cedar and white oak and worry less about the finish. Another, for glued lap boats is to leave out the frames. A third possibility is to fill the void with some kind of filler.

    Looking at the OPís boat, Iíd hope to have a long range plan in mind.
    Jim, wouldn't that be the case for any wooden lapstrake boat, that there are gaps between frames and the strakes? I do see your point but there must be some explanation for why these boats are built this way but the gaps are not, say, filled in with triangular wood plugs prior to finishing.
    J.D.

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