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Thread: Devlin Oolichan 13

  1. #1
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    Default Devlin Oolichan 13

    Hi,

    I've just purchased plans for Sam Devlins Oolichan 13.

    I haven't found any info or builds on the boat on the web and I was wondering if anyone had experience with this design. Looking at it compared to the candle fish 13 (which I believe it's based off) it's about 1ft wider and the same length.

    What size outboards do people usually use on something this size? and what sort of speeds do people get?
    I was hoping to keep it lightish as I want to use it as a chase boat to sailing dinghy when away at regattas, meaning I would want to man handle the boat on top of another boat on a trailer.
    What weight have people hit when building similar boats?
    I've noticed a big difference in weights between a 2 stroke and 4 stroke motors which almost gets to the point of not being able to manage the motor.

    what people thoughts on skipping taping the outside chines and just using the fiber glass sheathing to hold it together (plus taping the inside)
    have people used a single pack marine enamel before on their hulls?

    Any other things people have done in the past that I should watch out for?

    Thanks heaps
    Jimmy

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    I wouldn't mess around with skipping any of the taping. In stitch and glue boats, this is what holds the whole thing together. The exterior sheathing is not enough to do this, even with the interior taping.
    The website says a 30hp engine will take you to 30mph. A 25hp would do fine, but both motors will be the same weight in that class of engine. 2-strokes are getting pretty rare nowadays. Can't be bought new here in the U.S., I don't know about Australia.
    As for weight, you're not going to be picking this thing up and tossing it into another boat for transport. Best to get a separate trailer for that.
    With Covid, there is a huge wait for engines. I ordered a new 25hp Tohatso four months ago and am hoping to see it by Feb.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    I am with Rich Jones.
    Just why would you change the build specified by the designer? Are you a naval architect?
    The designer goes to a lot of work to specify the construction of his design to ensure strength and safety.
    The Oolichan looks to be a great boat and is most likely to be wider and heavier than the sail boat you supporting.
    Why not lift the sail boat on to the Oolichan? The sail boat is most likely to be lighter and not as strong as the Oolichan.
    I would be concerned about damage to the sailboat hull with the heavier power boat hull and motor.

    The NZ designed Frank Pelin designed Aquarius a similar wide beamed boat performs really well with a 10 to 15 hp but has been pushed along with 30hp.
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ot-Nomad-build
    http://scottjcarpenter.blogspot.com/
    So you have a range of options with engine power.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    I might add that I built a 14' Devlin Cackler 23 years ago.
    As I type this, the boat is sitting outside under it's winter cover awaiting another season, still going strong.
    I came very close to choosing the Candlefish 16 for my next build but decided I liked the classic lines of the Jericho Bay Lobster Skiff better.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I might add that I built a 14' Devlin Cackler 23 years ago.
    As I type this, the boat is sitting outside under it's winter cover awaiting another season, still going strong.
    I came very close to choosing the Candlefish 16 for my next build but decided I liked the classic lines of the Jericho Bay Lobster Skiff better.

    Thanks Rich, I’ve been following your Jericho Bay Lobster Skiff it was one of the final designs I was thinking about but went with the Oolichan as I really like the look of chines.
    We have a design built up in Noosa called a kellick which I love the look of. It’s only a single chine but similar to the Oolichan in the end.

    I will just build the boat to the plans, I lofted out the bulkheads on some cream Dacron I’ve had lying around and seeing just how small they actually end up I’m not so worried about weight.

    It’s quite handy having a sail loft at home with a nice big flat bench to do this on........


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    Got some more done this weekend / today (public holiday in AUS)

    All the frames are cut out and edges radiused and got the two layers of the transom glued together.
    I'm tossing up weather to coat the bulkhead with epoxy before I stand them up on the strong back.

    [IMG]IMG_2329 by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]IMG_2330 by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Plus got the transom knee glued up with leftover epoxy from the transom.

    [IMG]IMG_2331 by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    That's a good start!
    Pre-coating those bulkheads is a good idea. Easier to do when they are lying flat.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    How's it going on your project? Any new photos to share?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    Quote Originally Posted by lumberjack_jeff View Post
    How's it going on your project? Any new photos to share?
    Hi,
    I just looked back after a long hiatus (nearly 1 year to the day........)
    unfortunately work and life have got in the way over the last year.. Business has been crazy due to covid travel restriction (I'm pretty lucky) plus been trying to do offshore racing without much success.
    I'm still at the same spot with the frame currently gathering dust under my work table. hopefully 2022 is the year!

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    I would say that the OOlichan is based off the Candlefish 16. I gather the names refer to the same fish. Devlin's naming is weirdly chaotic. I can see how it might happen, but you have to be careful. The C16 and the O13 are the same hull, and it is a decently shaped hull. The C13 is pretty flat, and for all the money and time one puts into a boat like this, it would seem a better use of the qualities of plywood to make the V'd hull type, which is not to say that there is not a place for the C13. But if I want to symplify a boat it probably won't be the one seam that form the contour that actually tracks in the water all the time.

    The wider platform also seems to be a better choice for the heavier motors of today. Originally I was looking for the older Candlefish 16 which was closer to the C13 shape. I am a canoe displacement guy, and while I know you want to go in the correct direction for a planing hull, I was somewhat taken with the narrower waterline, until I carried home the motor, and it was like moving a piano...

    Of course the Candlefish 18 is based on the Pelicano, which is based on a Mexican boat type, though it does have a V'd bottom.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    That is a heavy 13 'er !

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    Yeah, definitely workboatie. But that is why people like working in them, they don't tire you out with quick motion. Doesn't really make them more durable as the armouring is only skin deep. Most of the weight is in things like the 1/2" bulkheads where substitutions could easily be made. And those ply materials are now really expensive.

    1/4" 1088 seconds (kinda a contradiction unless you live in the real world) is only 30 dollars where I live. And you could easily use 1/8", but that costs 75, with some half inch core. That would come in a lot cheaper than 2 layers of 1/2" 1088, and probably be fine for the transom, weigh about the same as 5/8", and less if you had something lighter than balsa in there.

    The seats are 1/2" ply. Basically the exact same seat in my trimaran, a boat where the seat is also the outside skin of the boat, is 1/4" There are a lot of ways to reduce the weight and cost if one wants to.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    "what people thoughts on skipping taping the outside chines and just using the fiber glass sheathing to hold it together (plus taping the inside)
    have people used a single pack marine enamel before on their hulls?"

    This has been answered already, but I did want to mention, for those who like to salt away scantlings and think about design:

    1) That the approach of using 6 oz would top out in canoes, and I would not use it on a ply canoe. So the weight of this thing, and the 30hp would be a different category.

    2) Technically you could ignore the outside surface, and have all your structure on the inside chine. Gougeons book does give scantlings on this approach, but they get massive. Only time I have actually seen this is on Wharram boats. He was a belt and suspenders guy. He was at the '76 expo where the Gougeons presented their composite wood techniques, and he jumped in with both feet, and came up with the Tiki line of boats. But as he did, he overbuilt everything. My friend was building a Tiki 46, and one could literally read the scantlings out of the Gougeon book for the kind of bond where you would mount a bookshelf to the wall, so to speak, using nothing but a cove.

    Nobody does this, because it isn't sensible on a boat where you need a balance of strength, fairing, and toughness. One does see quite a few designs were there is no glass on the inside, or at least no glass tape over the joint. And this can work well if the design creates rigidity some other way. All you need is modest coves on the inside of the hull.

    3) The cost of tape is not very high, but the PIA of doing it as Devlin describes, which is the way I used to do it, is there. I used to lay the tape in , then grind it and fair it, then do the glass over top. If you do this you get secondary bonds to the fiberglass (or you grind green glass). The better way to do it is to do the 6 oz, and then layer the tape over it as a step. One of the appeals of doing tape under the glass, is one would figure the glass sheet would fair in the tape. But the downside is damage is more likely to affect the glass sheeting where it goes over the tape; It is crazy more work to do it in steps, get everything done in one go; the glass tape will be super easy to wet out on the wet base of the glass, it will hardly take any time. fairing the tape in can be done with a scraper, mostly.

    4) While details like layers of tape and glass are pretty brainless - they probably didn't run a FEA on it... Keep in mind these coves and the wood geometry, also work as structural longitudinals. Kinda like stringers. They may also confer surface texture to steer a hull, or be designed to deal with grounding. At times one will come across articles where someone does a breaks-outside-the-joint test on a ply joint that has minimal structure to it, as though that is all that matters. But there are all kinds of other design goals.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    I'm building a Devlin design right now and can say that taping the outside taints and chines was one of the easiest steps of the whole process. Used a roller to wet them out, a squeegee to even things out and then I put peel ply over with resulting smooth edges. I did fair these out after, but it was pretty easy. I don't see any reason to try and justify "engineering" these out.

    These outside tapes went much faster and easier than the inside fillets that required thickened epoxy of just the right consistency to avoid sagging (too juicy) or small air voids (too dry), and more layers of glass. I recommend Slow part B if you're working on your own for these inside fillets to buy you the time to get all the air bubbles out (either with squeegee or bubble roller). I have mostly Fast part B and when temps in the garage got above 80F a couple weeks back I was really struggling getting the longer layups in place before the thickened epoxy underneath started warming up. Hate having to rush things.. Working early in the morning, and even mixing up some 50/50 Fast/Slow helped get me through.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Devlin Oolichan 13

    "salt away scantlings"...yea i guess that's me
    one inch thick transom...3/8" or half inch is plenty
    how many bulkheads??? zero would be best
    fiberglass tape? hahahahahahahaha

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