Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 48 of 48

Thread: Duckworks Scout

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,465

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinghy Pipedreams View Post
    But... Chris, what did you mean by "reelable"?
    Probably "reefable"?

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Yes, Tom, that just occurred to me, so I popped back on here. Heavy Duty Marine quality spell check... ;-) I was just about to post that when I saw your post.

    I looked at the Portage Pram rig when I stopped by Duckworks a few months back (great folks!) but didn't like the lack of reefing. Maybe the Scout rig would be something for me to check out. Ductworks didn't have a Scout sail/rig on site when I stopped by with my dinghy on trailer.
    Formite Jack Louden was kind enough to send me dimensions for the Pram.

    If anyone has videos of their own Scouts sailing in a stiff breeze and especially reefing underway I'm sure they'd be of interest here.
    It's a cool rig and I wish that Ductworks would show a better video than the only one I know of "Rigging the Portage Pram". I think they could sell a lot more of them that way! That ghosting action at the end of the rigging video is a bit frustrating!
    Last edited by Dinghy Pipedreams; 09-27-2022 at 05:54 PM.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Carol Stream, IL
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    I guess I missed the particulars (other than weight) of the Scout.
    The Duckworks and Turnpoint Design websites have nothing, that i could find.
    Other than "kits" do actual planes exist? at least study?

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    379

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOBBER View Post
    I guess I missed the particulars (other than weight) of the Scout.
    The Duckworks and Turnpoint Design websites have nothing, that i could find.
    Other than "kits" do actual planes exist? at least study?

    No. It's kind of confusing -- like they aren't actually trying to get people to build them. I wonder if the change in ownership has delayed things?

    I emailed them asking some (relatively basic) questions about dimensions (freeboard, etc), and they had to go to Turnpoint to get the answers.
    Last edited by dbp1; 09-29-2022 at 01:07 PM.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    When I was at Duckworks I asked (last Spring when I brought my dinghy over on the ferry to check the Pram's rig out) if they had any contacts for Scout owners/builders for feedback on the rig, etc. and they didn't know of any. I expressed interest in seeing how the reefing worked under way and seeing a video under sail.

    Wondered if this rig is attractive to current balance lug sailors, esp. fully battened lug owners.
    Last edited by Dinghy Pipedreams; 09-29-2022 at 01:00 PM.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    5,159

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinghy Pipedreams View Post

    I looked at the Portage Pram rig when I stopped by Duckworks a few months back (great folks!) but didn't like the lack of reefing.
    I built my PP as rowing only, while a capable little boat (emphasis on little) taking it out in conditions calling for a reef would not be IMO the best decision a sailor could make.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinghy Pipedreams View Post
    When I was at Duckworks I asked (last Spring when I brought my dinghy over on the ferry to check the Pram's rig out) if they had any contacts for Scout owners/builders for feedback on the rig, etc. and they didn't know of any. I expressed interest in seeing how the reefing worked under way and seeing a video under sail.

    Wondered if this rig is attractive to current balance lug sailors, esp. fully battened lug owners.

    There was some report (maybe on the Duckworks facebook group) of one builder, and I don't think they loved the rig, but it was one person and I have no idea of their experience. The complaint they had, if I remember correctly, was that it was hard to control the sail downwind, and were thinking about putting a boom on it (I think). But again, one person of unknown experience -- and it's sort of hard to imagine the full battens aren't a nicer system than standing lug, which plenty of people like!
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Steve, In an older thread I was considering the pram rig for a larger (10.5') dinghy so wanted the ability to reef. The Scout rig is the same/similar but offers "some" ability to reef but seeing that in action would be worth a thousand words in a video.

    With my boomless sprit main, I sometimes wonder if the battens on the Scout sail would allow more weather cocking dead downwind (sort of like a boom might) to keep the dreaded "death roll" away or at least minimize it. I lean towards "tacking" downwind 99% of the time now...

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Seattle Washington USA
    Posts
    519

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    The Scout rig is on my 9.5 ft pram. The first photo below shows how the luff sleeve stops about two ft from the bottom, and also the reef grommets at tack & clew and 2 more at mid point. To reef the sail, I release the halyard and lower the sail completely in the boat, then tie in the reef and re-hoist the sail. Easier said than done in rough water but doable. It sets beautifully and sails great on most points, but the boomless rig even with full-length battens must be tacked downwind to keep the sails full. It's likely due to my inexperience but downwind sailing is challenging. I am used to bigger boats and still have lots to learn on this little dinghy. Second photo shows the rig as purchased from Duckworks before the boom (discussed below) was added.

    The homemade boom (just a closet rod) shown in the photo is intended for better control of the sail downwind. It also simplifies sheet leads and will make tacking easier, as currently the sheets need to be handled like a jib. It also should make reefing easier if install a cheek block on the boom and set up jiffy reefing like on a bigger boat. The entire reefing process could then be done while seated near the mast, so no moving around in the boat in choppy windy conditions. I just finished the boom and test-fit rig on the boat at home but unfortunately didn't take a photo. It hasn't yet been tested it on the water.



    IMG_3326.jpg


    IMG_3019 (1).jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    ..." but the boomless rig even with full-length battens must be tacked downwind to keep the sails full."

    Thanks Jack for your details! A few more questions, please...

    l. Could you clarify what you mean about difficulty in keeping the sail full downwind?

    I have the opposite problem with my non
    battened boomless sail. It bellows out mightily forward and once the sprit goes forward of the mast at all it gets exciting very quickly!

    2 Could you reef without bringing the sail all the way down into the boat? Just to the reef points? Is the halyard able to function if lead back to the helmsman without going forward to the mast?

    3 Do your battens do the same if they go forward of the mast causing the "death roll" or does the sail simply stall out like a Junk rig can slowing the boat too much?

    4. Do you think the bendy c.f. mast as opposed to a wood stick effects keeping the sail full downwind? Or the square top?

    5. Would a single sheet to a single pulley/ rope horse at the stern (traditional) work with this sail? I've seen the double sheeting technique on the Ductwork's video which is what I assume you're referring to when you say yours is sheeted jib like?

    There seems to be a fair amount of interest in the rig (and the Scout design itself) here. Greatly appreciate the pics and review!

    Thanks again.
    Cheers, DP





    Last edited by Dinghy Pipedreams; 10-22-2022 at 12:55 AM.

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,465

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinghy Pipedreams View Post
    ..." but the boomless rig even with full-length battens must be tacked downwind to keep the sails full."

    Thanks Jack for your details! A few more questions, please...

    l. Could you clarify what you mean about difficulty in keeping the sail full downwind?


    From my own experience with boomless sails, probably this:

    A boom allows you to run the sail right out when running downwind, with the boom perpendicular to the boat. The boom holds the sail in this position, allowing the maximum surface of sail area to be deployed for catching the wind.
    You can duplicate this to some degree in a boomless rig by using an oar to push the clew of the sail farther outboard, and I do this sometimes, especially in light airs. The oar becomes a temporary boom.

    As you already noted, with a boomless rig, if you ease the sheet that far, you have no way of holding the clew corner of the sail outboard. As a result, rather than the clew moving outboard, the sail simply bellies out when you ease the sheet, creating a giant bag of sail instead of a relatively flat wind-catching shape. The sail stays loose and saggy, and can create a big bag of wind when you'd rather have a wide flat wind-catching surface.

    Another complication (which you also mentioned) is that, when you ease the sheet with a boomless sail, typically there is a LOT of sail twist. So, the tip of the yard (with a lugsail) moves farther than the clew of the sail. This means the tip of the yard moves so far that it moves forward of the mast. This is a very bad thing, as it can lead to a series of uncontrolled oscillations at frightening speed (the so-called "death roll"), often ending in a capsize to windward.

    The only way to avoid this is to make sure that the tip of the yard never moves forward of the mast. That means you can't ease the sheet very far. In turn, that means that you are not able to expose much sail area to the wind, making downwind sailing less efficient with a boomless rig. In actual practice, you just can't ease the sheet very far at all if you want to avoid the "death roll."

    Happily, none of this matters much at all. It's faster to "tack" downwind anyway, so there's no reason to sail dead downwind unless you're in a narrow channel.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Seattle Washington USA
    Posts
    519

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Below are some responses to your comments. Please bear in mind that I have no previous experience with boomless rigs or tiny sailboats in general so my responses or proposed solutions must be tempered with this information.]

    [Edit to add] I didn't see Tom's post above before sending my response, but he has vastly more experience so his comments should be taken far more seriously than mine!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinghy Pipedr ms View Post
    ..." but the boomless rig even with full-length battens must be tacked downwind to keep the sails full."

    Thanks Jack for your details! A few more questions, please...

    l. Could you clarify what you mean about difficulty in keeping the sail full downwind?

    Downwind, the battens aren't flexible enough to keep the sail 'wung out' and the sheet leads back to the transom so if I let out the sheet the sail is billowy and alternately fills then goes slack, which makes for erratic progress. I hope my boom will cure this, especially since the end of the boom can be forward of the mast. I hope the boom won't cause more problems than it solves.

    I have the opposite problem with my non
    battened boomless sail. It bellows out mightily forward and once the sprit goes forward of the mast at all it gets exciting very quickly!

    2 Could you reef without bringing the sail all the way down into the boat? Just to the reef points? Is the halyard able to function if lead back to the helmsman without going forward to the mast?

    The sail needs to be fully dropped, otherwise the wind, blowing across the beam, will blow clew end out over the water, unreachable. Jiffy reefing, with a cheek block would remedy this as it wouldn't matter if the boom end was unreachable, allowing the sail to be partially dropped (to the reef point),

    3 Do your battens do the same if they go forward of the mast causing the "death roll" or does the sail simply stall out like a Junk rig can slowing the boat too much?

    Maybe not a death roll, but alternately filling and going slack.

    4. Do you think the bendy c.f. mast as opposed to a wood stick effects keeping the sail full downwind? Or the square top?

    The CF mast isn't very bendy so I don't think it has much effect on that.

    5. Would a single sheet to a single pulley/ rope horse at the stern (traditional) work with this sail? I've seen the double sheeting technique on the Ductwork's video which is what I assume you're referring to when you say yours is sheeted jib like?

    Yes, my original sheeting arrangement was just like the Duckworks video. It's best if the sheet leads to the stern quarters for better sail shape (with boomless sail) when close hauled, but a sheet horse might work. My new boomed setup currently has the single sheet led to the rudder top, then through a pulley to the tiller, so I can grip the sheet and tiller with one hand. But the sheet leads to the center of the stern which is not as good as going to the stern corners.

    There seems to be a fair amount of interest in the rig (and the Scout design itself) here. Greatly appreciate the pics and review!

    Thanks again.
    Cheers, DP





    Last edited by Jack Loudon; 10-22-2022 at 12:33 PM.

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Duckworks Scout

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Loudon View Post
    Below are some responses to your comments. Please bear in mind that I have no previous experience with boomless rigs or tiny sailboats in general so my responses or proposed solutions must be tempered with this information.]

    [Edit to add] I didn't see Tom's post above before sending my response, but he has vastly more experience so his comments should be taken far more seriously than mine!
    Thank you Jack and Tom. It seems that the level of batten flexibility makes the biggest difference in the "equation". I assumed that they were flexible enough to allow more sail curvature downwind and wondered about that, as the Duckworth's video, in very light air made them look pretty stiff but couldn't really tell without a windy demonstration.

    I've been able to use a single sheet to a single pulley on a rope horse by using small spring clamps on the horse to keep the sheet in the stern corners. I'm experimenting until I decide whether or not to add thumb cleats along the rail for better sheeting angles until I change to another rig entirely.

    Glad to hear that the c.f. mast isn't flexible enough to cause any issues. I wondered about that the day I plopped one into my dinghy at Duck Works to see if it would fit the step. Unfortunately there wasn't a sail on hand that day to see/feel the battens.

    Yep. Letting the sprit go forward of the mast has only happened once! The immediacy of the jaw droppingly rapid "death roll" and deciding how to deal with it without capsizing in panic mode made me a downwind tack-er for life!

    This is the only aspect so far of boomless mains that I dislike. I'm sure we'll all be very interested to hear how your boomed version works out (or not), Jack. (Especially the reefing).
    Thanks again for standing up to the barrage of questions so well !

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •