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Thread: What is it?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Default What is it?

    Not "boaty", but I haven't a clue what this is. It's a stylus holder with multiple ball end styluses and several thin aluminum strips that store in the handle. Anybody seen anything like this? The only marking is "265C" on the barrel of the handle.
    IMG_6210.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    downward bound
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    Default Re: What is it?

    Bell System 265c burnisher

  3. #3
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    Central Coast, Ca
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    Default Re: What is it?

    I wonder if the "strips" are abrasive, perhaps diamond impregnated?

  4. #4
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    Sep 2015
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    Viroqua, Wisconsin
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    Default Re: What is it?

    They look like they have some texture, but did they do diamond impregnation back then? Aluminum
    oxide’s pretty tough stuff, may have been what they used instead?

    https://www.scribd.com/document/2019...Burnisher-265C
    Last edited by sp_clark; 12-26-2020 at 09:49 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: What is it?

    Don't know about impregnation, but I have a Van Norman boring bar from the 1930's that came with a pint bottle of diamond based liquid for sharpening the bits on a cast iron lapping wheel fixture, so it wasn't unknown.

    he-he, back to Holtzapffel...
    "Notwithstanding the apparent expensive of the diamond powder, it is very generally employed… and although for this and some of the softer stones, emery, or in some cases even sand, might be successfully employed, the diamond powder is almost exclusively used, as it is found to the most economical, when the time occupied in the cutting is taken into account. The diamond powder cuts more rapidly than emery and it’s very much more enduring. Many lapidaries employ the same lead mill, both for roughing and smoothing the surface of the stones; some lapidaries however employ two benches for these purposes so that the work may be taken from the roughing mill to the smoothing mill, with out the loss of the time incurred in crushing the coarse emery quite fine, but when one bench only is used for the roughing and smoothing, the same lap is used to serve both purposes. (Holtzapffel, 1864, pg. 1306)"
    https://www.gemsociety.org/article/l...ps-and-polish/

  6. #6
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    Apr 2015
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    Default Re: What is it?

    Thanks Gents! Makes perfect sense...my Father-in-Law (long gone, alas) was an electrical engineer back in the day. Murn' found this in some of his old stuff. Now we know

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