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Thread: Wood ID by Bark

  1. #1
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    Default Wood ID by Bark

    I've done some searching around & not getting anything for sure. The tree grew in northeastern Vermont - probably 30 miles from the Canadian border - so fairly far north. It's grained like ash (very straight), but lighter in weight.

    This pic has 2 pieces of firewood. Top one is definitely ash, but I'm wondering about the other one:

    Bark.jpg

    Here's the grain:

    barkgrain.jpg

    Any thoughts?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Possibility - though the bark is a bit more red than your pic or others I found online. I also didn't know cottonwoods grew this far north.

    Thanks!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Modesto Ash?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Modesto Ash?
    Other than they don't grow anywhere near VT?

    The bark is flatter than other ashes - grooves for sure, but the high part is fairly flat.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    They arenít native to where I live, either, but theyíve been planted all over.

    How was I to know they werenít trees form a lot? Maybe someone planted one?

    Iím out of thoughts.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    black poplar
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Garret, I think that Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) are a much finer and lighter colored grain more like Aspen (Populus tremuloides) .
    I think it looks more like (Butternut Juglans cinerea)
    https://www.wood-database.com/butternut/

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Looks like ash, that has been run over by the skidder. I've got a lot that looks like that in the wood pile this year. The shot of the wood looks like Fraxanus as well.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Butternut.

    Looks just like it, both the bark and the wood, indigenous, and lighter than ash 27 vs 34 lbs/cu ft.
    Last edited by SMARTINSEN; 11-26-2020 at 04:13 PM.
    Steve Martinsen

  10. #10
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    Default

    Middle one looks a lot like Osage Orange (Bois d'Arc) to me. You can tell for sure by looking at the wood. Fresh cut, it will be a pretty bright yellow/orange color. Take a handful of fresh shavings or sawdust, toss it in some water and bring it up to a boil. You'll get a quite excellent yellow dye from the shavings.

    https://bygl.osu.edu/node/625



    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. ó P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Interesting. Black poplar was one of my thoughts. Hadn't thought of Butternut - but I have one at the bottom of the driveway that I can compare to.

    There is little yellow in the wood, so I don't think it's the Osage - but of course I could be wrong.

    Thanks everyone!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Osage is very hard, and much heavier, and lacking the distinctive color, I am quite sure it is not.
    Steve Martinsen

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by SMARTINSEN View Post
    Osage is very hard, and much heavier, and lacling the distinctive color, I am quite sure it is not.
    OK - then I agree - this wood is lighter than ash & puts out a lot less heat in the woodstove.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Osage is more calorific than black locust, which it could be better compared with.
    Steve Martinsen

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Black(brown,swamp) ash.
    Lighter,more scraggly(bark and tree shape) and has fewer btu than white or green ash.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Arf = Mahogany
    Arf arf = White Oak
    Arf arf arf = Teak

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Black(brown,swamp) ash.
    Lighter,more scraggly(bark and tree shape) and has fewer btu than white or green ash.
    R
    I've heard the term swamp ash, but not seen it. This wood was all supposedly cut on a hillside at fairly high elevation - but who knows. Thanks
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    You could end the speculation by sending a specimen to the Forest Products Laboratory wood identification service. They will identify three samples per year for individuals at no charge. I sent a specimen that I believed to be mahogany, and they identified it as carapa genus.

    https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/research/c...dfactsheet.php
    "George Washington as a boy
    was ignorant of the commonest
    accomplishments of youth.
    He could not even lie."

    -- Mark Twain

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    A couple more pics, including a close up,clean,end grain shot, wouldn't hurt.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by UCanoe_2 View Post
    You could end the speculation by sending a specimen to the Forest Products Laboratory wood identification service. They will identify three samples per year for individuals at no charge. I sent a specimen that I believed to be mahogany, and they identified it as carapa genus.

    https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/research/c...dfactsheet.php
    I'd thought of that, but don't need to know that badly...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    A couple more pics, including a close up,clean,end grain shot, wouldn't hurt.
    R
    I'll grab one soon. The piece above is now BTUs, smoke & ashes.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    A couple more pics, including a close up,clean,end grain shot, wouldn't hurt.
    R
    Here's end grain from another piece:

    barkend.jpg
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    we'll need you to plane that end grain down smooth with a low angle block plane, then get us a photo of the the grain structure through a 10X loupe

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    we'll need you to plane that end grain down smooth with a low angle block plane, then get us a photo of the the grain structure through a 10X loupe

    I'll get right on that.






    Soon.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  25. #25
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    Default

    Send a sample to Dr. Richard Jaegels.

    Kevin


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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Smallish tree with close rings,darker heart and ring porous.
    Sticking with my answer.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Smallish tree with close rings,darker heart and ring porous.
    Sticking with my answer.
    R
    Some of the pieces were from an 18-20" diameter tree - but I think you may be right on the ID. Thanks.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Wood ID by Bark

    Beat on it with the sledge end of a maul. If Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) it should separate at the rings.
    Black Ash is commonly used in basket weaving. The endgrain of the wood is pounded with a mallet—collapsing the weaker earlywood, and liberating the latewood to be peeled off in strips. The strips are subsequently collected and woven into baskets.
    [QUOTEOdor: Gives off a distinct, moderately unpleasant smell when being worked.][/QUOTE]
    (Quotes from The Wood Database​ )

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