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Thread: My 5th great grandfather

  1. #1
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    Default My 5th great grandfather

    My sister sent this today.

    marker.jpg

    house.jpg

    When it was constructed in 1778, the large stone waterwheel ground corn and wheat for the surrounding settlements. Builder Jeremiah Dungan, a Pennsylvania Dutch stone mason, had moved south to start a new life next to his brother-in-law’s retired fort on the Watauga River. The mill and the Stone House, both of which are on the National Historic Register of Landmarks, were constructed from the fort’s stone foundation. With each succeeding generation the business and farmstead expanded. In the 1880’s, George Washington St. John, the great nephew of Jeremiah Dungan, became the first St. John to operate the enterprise. Betty Dawson’s father, George St. John was the one to modernize and re-energize (literally) production after several hard years during the Great Depression and World War II, when he connected electricity to the mill in 1935.

    Ron and Betty took over ownership in 1975. They continued to grind custom mixed grains and sell farm supply and locally made goods. The barn remains a popular stop on the Quilt Trail as the cheerily painted “Dutch Boy and Girl” mural, honoring Dungan’s heritage, greets passer-bys from Watauga Road.

    “My father worked at the mill until well into his 90’s,” says Betty. “For all his life he embraced the changes as they came his way.” St. John Mill has paid taxes to four governments—the Watauga Association, North Carolina, the State of Franklin, and Tennessee—and weathered many changes. Despite the mill’s competitive prices and service and top-notch non-GMO grains, changing consumer patterns and the rise of corn ethanol, necessitated that the business once again change with the times.

    Under Ron and Betty, St. John Mill will continue to support the causes that have always been dear to them: supporting the strong tradition of east Tennessee arts and culture, teaching about the rich local history, and strengthening community leadership and education. “We want to continue to play an active and positive role for our neighbors and the larger region,” they say.

    With Ron now serving as a member of the Appalachian Resource Conservation and Development Council, which coordinates the Quilt Trail projects and the LocalGoods.org business directory, more and more community leaders are hearing their story and helping them brainstorm a new chapter of that story.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    Nice stone. Simple, efficient building. I like it very much.

    I can understand changing the source of power. But where's the water that drove the waterwheel?
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    Nice stone. Simple, efficient building. I like it very much.

    I can understand changing the source of power. But where's the water that drove the waterwheel?
    The photo is of the 'stone manor' mentioned on the historical plaque. Also the 'Stone House' mentioned in the text.
    Rattling the teacups.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    cool thing to be linked to.

    when you think on it...seven or eight human generations isn't really very long. and so much has changed.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    I just found out about that today from my sister who is the family genealogist..

    That was his house. It seems it was built on the foundation of an older fort. It seems that Dungan owned at least two mills. This was one.



    It seems that another was torn down in 2017 or so.



    https://www.elizabethton.com/2017/10...re-demolition/

  6. #6
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather


  7. #7
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    It seems that there was a stream named Brush Creek that ran behind the mill. https://www.google.com/maps/place/St...!4d-82.3041323

  8. #8
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    The second church built by my great great great grandfather Parson Tom. Across the road is a family cemetery containing family members born from the 1700's to the 1950's. He first preached from a spot known as Bethel Rock, then built the first chapel west of the mountains, then the one in the picture.
    Last edited by JayInOz; 11-28-2020 at 12:27 AM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    Bathurst Post Mon 15 Oct 1883 p. 1Text:The Late Mr, William Tom,Commonly known as "Parson Tom,"In May last he celebrated his 92nd birthday, havingbeen born on the 25th May, 1791, in the parish ofSt. Breward, Cornwall. On the last day of the year1817 he married Miss Annie Lane of Basil, Devon,and thirteen children were born to and reared bythem. In June of 1723, Mr. Tom left Englandwith his family in the ship Belinda, in companywith the late Mr. W. Lane, of Orton Park, Bathurst;but the journey was a disastrous one. The ship waswrecked off Amsterdam, and lost all the masts,rudder, and bulwarks, five of the crew being drowned ;but jury masts were rigged and the dismantledvessel beat up to Hobart Town, from which placethe brig Jupiter brought the party on to Sydney,which port was reached early in December, 1823.Mr. Tom engaged with Mr. Jonathan Hassel, assuperintendent, at Hoota Hill, Macquarie Plains,but afterwards settled at Sydmouth Valley, wherehe built a good dwelling-house, which, however, wasburned to the ground the day after it was finislied.Further ill-fortune followed, for all the sheep heowned (500 ewes) died with footrot, and Mr. Tomwas left houseless and nearly pennyless. He thensold his grant of land to Major Lowe, of Bringelly,and removed to the spot known as Mutton's Falls,where he built a house and resided for some twoyears. This property he subsequently sold to thelate Mr. W. Mutton, senior. In 1829 he obtaineda grant of land from Sir R. Darling, and took upSpringfield, at which place he resided until the dayof his death.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather



    We were the second owners of the Alexander Craig house colonial Williamsburg.
    His son went to The College of William & Mary and the first graduating class of University Pennsylvania.



    Attached is picture of Tess' GREAT,GREAT,GREAT,GREAT,GREAT Grandfather Rev. Archibald Foster born (1755) in son of Capt. Foster and Scotch Lady of Rank. Capt. Foster,RA (Roya Army or Royal Artillery) may have also been born in IRELAND. One thing for sure, anyone with Rank in Ireland during that period of time was not Catholic.

    FOSTER NATIVITY:

    Capt. Foster,RA Ireland
    Rev. Arrchibald Ireland
    Dr. Archibald T. Williamsburg,VA
    William J Portsmouth,VA
    John P. Manhattan, NY
    Joseph E Bronx, NY
    Joseph D Bronx, NY
    Tess S Manhattan, NY
    Last edited by Joe (SoCal); 11-28-2020 at 05:49 PM.
    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

  11. #11
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    I have pushed my lot back to my fourth great-grandfather:
    Hampshire, Portsmouth Burials
    Thomas Miller
    Age 86
    Birth year 1744
    Denomination Anglican
    Residence Cumberland ST
    Burial date 13 Apr 1830
    Burial place Portsea, St Mary
    County Hampshire

    Cumberland Street is just outside the dockyard boundary wall hard by the Bonfire Corner gate.
    https://www.wikitree.com/index.php?t...68837&public=1
    His son John was serving in the Royal Marines Artilliary in 1827, his grandson Henry William was in Military Service 1845-1854 and was serving as a mariner in Chatham in 1859 before joining the coastguard service.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    *smiles*

    My fourth great-grandfather, Avram Bernstein, was a peasant in what is now Belarus. According to a police report from the middle of the 19th century, he owned two cows and a horse, as well as 'some lumber', paid 30 rubles per year as rent on the land he lived on, and was not causing any displeasure to the nearby residents of the community

    (The police report was found in the archives by the Belarus Historical Society, which I paid to do research on my family)
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  13. #13
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    My 5th great grandfather, Thomas S, was hung, drawn and beheaded for treason in 1746.
    He had been an Adjutant in the Manchester Regiment, an English Jacobite regiment in the 1745 rebellion, and was captured at the siege of Carlisle.
    Executed in London at Kennington in 1746, his head was later mounted on a spike on Manchester Exchange.
    Four years later, a medical student, Edward Hall, a Jacobite sympathiser, stole the head and buried it at St. Annes.
    He later became an eminent surgeon. His sister confessed to his theft on her deathbed.
    (My 6th great grandfather had been similarly executed for treason following the 1715 rebellion. His son, Thomas S, noted above, stole his father's head off Manchester Town Cross in 1745)
    The family seems to have had a long standing attraction towards Scotland...
    Beat that!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    I spent two hours last night and another hour this morning trying to load the second part of what I posted about my great great great grandfather. Message has too many characters, message is too short, page is unresponsive, timed out etc., etc. Bloody frustrating. JayInOz


    Mr. Tom was the first to bring a four-wheeledvehicle over the mountains — a waggon. He was thefirst to work bullocks in the yoke in the colony, andwas the first white man settler to cross the Macquariewith his family to reside West of Bathurst, and thishe did in the year 1830.Mr. Tom, with the late Mr. W. Lane, the lateMr. G. Hawke, and Mr. John Glasson, who is nowin New Zealand, were the cause of bringing over themountains the first Wesleyan minister-— Rev. J.Orton. Subsequently the gentlemen named becameresponsible to the British Conference for the salaryand expenses of a minister direct from England;the Rev. Frederick Lewis being sent about the year1836. The deceased gentleman was most energeticand acceptable as a local preacher in connection withthe Wesleyan Church in this district. He has left11 children, 68 grand-children, and 47 great-grandchildren. He was buried at Byng on Sundayafternoon, the 1st instant, in the presence of animmense concourse of people, the majority of whomhad known him intimately, and who as they saw thecoffin lowered in the grave were moved to utter theprayer, ' Let me die the death of the righteous, andlet my last end be like his.' The funeral serviceswere conducted by the Revs. J, A. Waddell, R.Allen, R.Dyson, and W. G. R. Stephinson.— B.F.P.It may be added to the above account that thelate Mr. William Tom's wife died in her seventy -fourth year, at Springfield, in 1870. It is mostremarkable how death kept away from the Tomfamily for many years. The late Mrs. Tom lived inthree different homes during her long life, for upwards of twenty years in each, without a single deathoccurring in the house. Springfield, at the CornishSettlement, was one of the houses, and it was in theyear 1868 that the first death took place under thesame roof where she resided, and this was an infantnamed Horace Wesley, son of her daughter Emma,the wife of the late Thomas G. Webb .The late Mrs. William Tom had thirteen children— eight sons and five daughters. All the sons were5ft. llin. high and over, and one of them reachingas much as 6ft. 4in. in his stockings. None of thislarge family of children departed this life until theyoungest child reached the age of 8 years. It wason the 2nd of December, 1872, that Mrs. G. T.Webb died at Springfield, and only eight days laterMrs. G. R. Glasson, another daughter of the lateMr. Tom, went to her rest, after many years ofsevere trial and suffering from a tumour. Her lifewas truly that of a brave soldier, for in her greatesttrials her spirit never flagged, and the patience sheexhibited during the severe operations performed byseveral medical men astonished them all.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: My 5th great grandfather

    Quote Originally Posted by birlinn View Post
    My 5th great grandfather, Thomas S, was hung, drawn and beheaded for treason in 1746.
    He had been an Adjutant in the Manchester Regiment...
    Fascinating! And in November 1745 Charles Edward Stuart stopped in the town of my birth, and stayed in what became a shoe shop (where I first got shoes as a toddler a mere 220 years later) during the siege of Carlisle. There's a plaque and everything! (To, ahem, CES, not me...) My ancestors? I've traced some going back to the - unbelievable - 13th century.

    Andy
    "In case of fire ring Fellside 75..."

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