Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Let the Brining Begin.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    35,335

    Default Let the Brining Begin.

    This year Renee is doing the whole Thanksgiving dinner thing. It's been on her bucket list forever. We are obviously having a very small Thanksgiving, my daughter, her boyfriend, and possibly my crazy right wing trumptard buddy might stop by.

    Renee is doing a brined turkey, oven baked, over a mirepoix of the trinity of carrots, celery & onions. Roasted Brussel Sprouts, stuffing, mash potatoes, pan juice gravy, and home made cranberry sauce.

    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    24,058

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Once again, I'm going to crank up the smoker... it's just SWMBO and myself, so it's a small turkey, and I'm going to do mashed red bliss potatoes, and a gluten-free stuffing with sausage.

    We have considered the risks. Ordinarily, we'd convene at my sister's house... but the threat of exposure from two grade school granddaughters, a middle school grand nephew, and my high school teacher son-in-law, dictates that we're going to take maximum precautions. We have at least a few people with pre-existing conditions, like my sister, who has polymiositis... and the risk that the young kids could be asymptomatic carriers simply argues against it.

    We WILL, however, convene via Zoom for a while, to stay connected.

    My best to all my fellow bilge members... stay safe!
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    lake erie, Ohio
    Posts
    686

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Wife sent me for chicken gizzards said she has the livers, after three stores I found em. She got her grandmother's recipe for stuffing the bomb I don't need anything else maybe some cognac.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,693

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    This year Renee is doing the whole Thanksgiving dinner thing. It's been on her bucket list forever. We are obviously having a very small Thanksgiving, my daughter, her boyfriend, and possibly my crazy right wing trumptard buddy might stop by.

    Renee is doing a brined turkey, oven baked, over a mirepoix of the trinity of carrots, celery & onions. Roasted Brussel Sprouts, stuffing, mash potatoes, pan juice gravy, and home made cranberry sauce.


    From a food-safety point of view, you really shouldn't have that raw turkey sitting above anything else in the cooler.

    We have a bird soaking in a clean 5-gallon bucket, but I have a friend with an empty walk-in cooler at his now closed restaurant so space wasn't an issue. I'm tired of this holiday season already. Too much stress with people trying to cook things they don't normally eat and hoping for a viral instagram result... not to mention the dudes who only set foot in a grocery store once a year who are flummoxed by the lists their wives have written for them.

    Bah Humbug
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    13,547

    Default

    I like a brined turkey myself.

    My technique is to use an ice chest. I scrub it out well with a bleach sanitizing solution. I make the brine stronger than the normal recommendation and refrigerate it. Then the turkey goes in the ice chest with the refrigerate brine and ice overnight.

    Crispy skin? Not a problem when you roast your bird on the charcoal Weber kettle ... and it keeps the oven open for important things like pie, stuffing and candied yams.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    the hills
    Posts
    59,549

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    oh yeah. Yesterday I opened up the hall fridge and it was full of turkey parts waiting to be smoked. Daughter was up until midnight managing the smoking and now there are bins of smoked turkey in there. Migod the feast awaits.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    the hills
    Posts
    59,549

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    From a food-safety point of view, you really shouldn't have that raw turkey sitting above anything else in the cooler.

    We have a bird soaking in a clean 5-gallon bucket, but I have a friend with an empty walk-in cooler at his now closed restaurant so space wasn't an issue. I'm tired of this holiday season already. Too much stress with people trying to cook things they don't normally eat and hoping for a viral instagram result... not to mention the dudes who only set foot in a grocery store once a year who are flummoxed by the lists their wives have written for them.

    Bah Humbug
    oh Steve, remember Bob Cratchitt and Tiny Tim.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    35,335

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Do you have a warrant?
    Posts
    9,115

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Joe, what's in your brine? I'm not expert on that, good advice helps.

    My turkey is currently brining in a 5 gallon bucket with:
    - 1 Tablespoon of salt per gallon of water (so in this case, 2.5 Tablespoons for the water to submerge the turkey)
    - Simmered in a stainless steel cup measure of water on the stove for an hour: 3 bay leaves and 1/2 teaspoon of fresh ground black pepper, then add to the brine.

    Usually I spatchcock the bird, then smoke on the grill (low heat) for a couple hours, then finish at 425F in the oven for maybe 45 minutes if I recall, resulting in a crisp skin and juicy meat. This year, I've been requested to smoke half and leave half unsmoked.

    As usual, the turkey was free; We wait on food shopping then get enough food at Winco to go over $100 and then get a free turkey as a result. (And their prices are low, so Heinlein does not apply in this case.) In fact, this year we got two free birds, and not by going through twice. We're at the store and getting out of the car a couple weeks ago, putting on masks. Masked lady approaches, we thought to hand off her cart:
    "You guys want a free turkey? I got it free because I went over a hundred dollars, but I'm never going to cook this thing."
    "HELL YEAH! THANKS!"

    That was a 20 lb bird. The one I later picked out in the store was 23. Cooking the 20 now, will do the 23 for a later gathering.

    EDIT: Hey Joe, did your stove come with that cast iron griddle setup, or did you swap out two grates for that? Ah, I now see one knob for that, answers my question. Nice setup!
    Last edited by Bob (oh, THAT Bob); 11-25-2020 at 08:41 PM.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    70,481

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    There's nothing so lovely as a Salty Sailor Lass.

    Even if the Briny Beauty is currently adventuring with a Turkey, and not a Catboat.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Do you have a warrant?
    Posts
    9,115

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Brussels sprouts: I usually split'em in half, flat side down in a hot skillet with olive oil and brown the faces, then add chicken stock and simmer covered until tender but not mushy. Can finish with ground black pepper or Parmesan cheese if desired. But I recently saw an article that advocates pulling all the leaves off of the core and then roasting, that way the leaves get crispy, I may try that this year.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Long Beach, California
    Posts
    997

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    There’s a place called Simzys here in LB which roasts Brussels Sprouts with lemon, capers and anchovies, and they are excellent. Most recipes for roasting I’ve seen cook the sprouts part way first by steaming before roasting to ensue complete cooking.

    Ralphie

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    13,547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    Joe, what's in your brine? I'm not expert on that, good advice helps.

    My turkey is currently brining in a 5 gallon bucket with:

    - 1 Tablespoon of salt per gallon of water (so in this case, 2.5 Tablespoons for the water to submerge the turkey)

    - Simmered in a stainless steel cup measure of water on the stove for an hour: 3 bay leaves and 1/2 teaspoon of fresh ground black pepper, then add to the brine.
    Cook's Illustrated, who "invented" the notion back in the early 90s recommends brine concentrations based on you long you are going to brine the bird.

    For a fresh turkey with a short brine of 4 hours, they recommend a solution of 1 cup of table salt per US gallon of water. That's 7.7% by weight.

    That yields, according to the labs they sent their brined turkeys to for analysis, a finished sodium content of 0.22% sodium by weight.

    1 cup of table salt, according to the USDA weighs 292 g. 1 US gallon of water 3,785 cubic centimeters, and since 1 cc of water is 1 gram... 3.785 kilos. 292 / 3785 is... 0.07715, 7.7%

    For a long 12-hour overnight brine, they recommend a solution half that concentrated (1/2 cup table salt per US gallon of water) which comes out to a 3.9% solution by weight.

    The short brine yields yields, according to the labs they sent their brined turkeys to for analysis, a finished sodium content of 0.22% sodium by weight, and the long brine, 0.21% sodium by weight.

    https://www.cooksillustrated.com/art...brine-a-turkey

    They do not recommend bringing "self-basting turkeys" as those are already loaded with salt, and will be way to salty when your down.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Do you have a warrant?
    Posts
    9,115

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    You'da man, Nick. Makes a lot of sense. But WAY too much salt for me.

    I always buy an unbrined turkey, and long brine it overnight to sink in. The fridge isn't big enough so I soak it in a clean 5 gallon bucket with cold water and a couple double handfuls of ice tossed in, on the cold garage floor, covered; In the morning, the last of the ice is still barely there.

    Based on experimentation, I like only 1 Tablespoon of salt per US gallon of water, starting the brine early in the evening the night before roasting, and since I spatchcock the bird (20lb'er roasts in an hour at 425F), that means I don't pull it out until late morning to smoke first, so probably 14 hours brining, just enough to taste a little little salt, not much. I can always salt it at the table.

    My big question is what else in the brine? I have been simmering black pepper and bay leaf for an hour to add to the brine, but don't taste it in the end. Sometimes I have added some fat to that, as many spice flavors are fat soluble, but then I figured that the fat would just ball up into globules in the cold brine and not do anything, probably correct.

    But this year, I did better: Researching the above, I found that "blooming" spices in hot oil/fat can release up to 10X the flavor. So in a pan with several tablespoons of olive oil, I sauteed 1 Tablespoon EACH: dried rosemary, dried thyme, minced fresh sage, and minced fresh oregano, until lightly browned, let cool, then slathered that, and some melted butter, on the bird right before smoking or directly roasting (I did half smoked, half not this year), NOT in the brine. THAT really worked great, much better spice flavor than in past years. So the brining is just for the salt, spices do later, and do bloom them.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    36,525

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    I was under the impression that brining isn't so much about salting the meat to taste, but to infuse a layer of salt into the surface.

    Thus, the moisture wants to stay with the meat, rather than boil away.

    This is not to say that one saves all the moisture, just that it leaves the meat more slowly.
    Rattling the teacups.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    35,335

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    I was under the impression that brining isn't so much about salting the meat to taste, but to infuse a layer of salt into the surface.

    Thus, the moisture wants to stay with the meat, rather than boil away.

    This is not to say that one saves all the moisture, just that it leaves the meat more slowly.
    I honestly have no idea about brining but I will say this was one of the most moist turkey I've ever had.

    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    13,547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    You'da man, Nick. Makes a lot of sense. But WAY too much salt for me.

    I always buy an unbrined turkey, and long brine it overnight to sink in. The fridge isn't big enough so I soak it in a clean 5 gallon bucket with cold water and a couple double handfuls of ice tossed in, on the cold garage floor, covered; In the morning, the last of the ice is still barely there.

    Based on experimentation, I like only 1 Tablespoon of salt per US gallon of water, starting the brine early in the evening the night before roasting, and since I spatchcock the bird (20lb'er roasts in an hour at 425F), that means I don't pull it out until late morning to smoke first, so probably 14 hours brining, just enough to taste a little little salt, not much. I can always salt it at the table.

    My big question is what else in the brine? I have been simmering black pepper and bay leaf for an hour to add to the brine, but don't taste it in the end. Sometimes I have added some fat to that, as many spice flavors are fat soluble, but then I figured that the fat would just ball up into globules in the cold brine and not do anything, probably correct.

    But this year, I did better: Researching the above, I found that "blooming" spices in hot oil/fat can release up to 10X the flavor. So in a pan with several tablespoons of olive oil, I sauteed 1 Tablespoon EACH: dried rosemary, dried thyme, minced fresh sage, and minced fresh oregano, until lightly browned, let cool, then slathered that, and some melted butter, on the bird right before smoking or directly roasting (I did half smoked, half not this year), NOT in the brine. THAT really worked great, much better spice flavor than in past years. So the brining is just for the salt, spices do later, and do bloom them.

    What the brining does is to (according to the science guys that give me a headache) is that it "unwinds" the proteins in the meat and suffuses them with water (salt being hygroscopic and wanting to I've from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration traction.

    That is a different process than injection your meat with liquid: that just puts puddles of liquid in the meat.

    Brine it in the strong brines that are recommended and you wind up with salt levels in the meat that are well within what you'd get if you slates meat conventionally - less than a teaspoon per pound.

    The surface of the brined meat will be quite salty. Before cooking, you really need to (1) rinse the meat to get rid of as much salt as possible, and (2) dry it, so it will brown up and crisp up as you might want.

    According to Cook's Illustrated and Serious Ears, adding sugar, herbs, spices, etc. to the brine really doesn't do much of anything.

    FWIW, that's also the assessment of marinating meat: doesn't really do squat. Doesn't penetrate more than a millimeter or two. Just brush on the marinade and cook it.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Isle of Mull, Scotland
    Posts
    7,759

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    No can do- I am a bear of little brine.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Farmington, Oregon
    Posts
    15,363

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    isn't basically every supermarket turkey already brined?

    some done better than others, of course. you get what you pay for.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    21,423

    Default

    We bought a pre-brined fresh turkey from a butcher this year. $3 per pound.
    Best we ever had.

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    24,058

    Default Re: Let the Brining Begin.

    I smoke the turkeys every year... although, this year, instead of TWO 15lb turkeys, it was one 8 lb turkey... since it was only for SWMBO and myself. The normal T-day compliment would be 12-14 people.

    Regarding smoked turkey: I love the flavor, but this year, I think there was TOO much smoke... it was very strong.
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  22. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    13,547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L.W. Baxter View Post
    isn't basically every supermarket turkey already brined?

    some done better than others, of course. you get what you pay for.

    No. "Natural" turkeys are just... turkey, "Self-basting" birds have been injected with a brine solution, and "kosher" birds have to have slaughtered and processed according to kashrut, and so must be kashered - soaked and salted to draw out the blood.

    From https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/10/...-injected.html

    Natural birds contain no additives and are minimally processed. They require careful attention and a good thermometer if you want to ensure juiciness, but in general, they have a stronger, more "turkey-ish" flavor, as they are not diluted with any extra liquid. For extra juiciness, a brining or salting step should be included in your preparations. If you value deep flavor and are willing to put in a bit of extra care to get there, choose a natural bird.

    Kosher birds have been pre-salted and as such, are deeply seasoned and good at retaining moisture. They can be cooked directly as-is and will dry out less than a natural bird if overcooked. The downside is that you can't control your own level of seasoning. Kosher birds are a good compromise between natural and self-basting birds.

    Self-basting birds have been injected with a salt and flavor solution to help keep them moist while cooking. They come out incredibly moist, almost wet, and can be cooked directly from the package with minimal pre-roast work required. They also tend to be dull and diluted in flavor. If you value ease of preparation and juiciness over all, this is your bird.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •