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Thread: Talk to me about row-cruising

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Yesterday was a day to put my heavy old 13 1/2 'Good Little Skiff to work, hour row, change my haul out to a winter ice proof rig, then an hour to row back, with a night haul out. Just pulling along, slipping along shore to stay out of the wind. Boredom on the water can set in, and I'd figure out how to spend some time pullng before you commit. With your size, sleeping in the boat will optimally be on the the floor boards, not high up. For designs with side tanks you should check the width between tanks. With your strength if you can afford it, something that is longer than 15' foot would be nice. Clint Chase's Drake it set up to have a small downwind sail.

    Note that you have access to an erg. Serious time on it is no bad thing. I like cheap thriller novels or really old time rock and roll. A removable small sliding seat is good way to transfer erg muscles to a fixed seat boat. Up coming is the Concept 2 holiday challenge. Need 7k a day to make 200, but that may be hard with limited access in a gym.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  2. #107
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    Jul 2009
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    Zbigit
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Yesterday was a day to put my heavy old 13 1/2 'Good Little Skiff to work, hour row, change my haul out to a winter ice proof rig, then an hour to row back, with a night haul out. Just pulling along, slipping along shore to stay out of the wind. Boredom on the water can set in, and I'd figure out how to spend some time pullng before you commit. With your size, sleeping in the boat will optimally be on the the floor boards, not high up. For designs with side tanks you should check the width between tanks. With your strength if you can afford it, something that is longer than 15' foot would be nice. Clint Chase's Drake it set up to have a small downwind sail.

    Note that you have access to an erg. Serious time on it is no bad thing. I like cheap thriller novels or really old time rock and roll. A removable small sliding seat is good way to transfer erg muscles to a fixed seat boat. Up coming is the Concept 2 holiday challenge. Need 7k a day to make 200, but that may be hard with limited access in a gym.
    It's occurred to me that it might be wise to borrow or rent a dedicated rowing boat and try a few 3-4 hour excursions!

    Agreed, that any sleeping arrangements on board should be on the floorboards!

    In terms of length, the skerry was 15 1/2 feet long and it fit very nicely in my front yard. A 16 footer, sure...no problem. 17, yeah. 18 ummmm.....and 19, no way.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    central cal
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    20,192

    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    There is a 14í flattie just sitting there, in the yard... she AINíT gonna be used anytime soon.

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    New Orleans, LA, USA
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    113

    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Have you considered a Whitehall? That's what I've settled on for rowing for exercise on Lake Pontchartrain. Fast and stable, according to what's written. There are two chapters about it in one of Mr Gardner's books. With drawings.

  5. #110
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    Apr 2010
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    Fairfield, CA
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    It's occurred to me that it might be wise to borrow or rent a dedicated rowing boat and try a few 3-4 hour excursions!

    Agreed, that any sleeping arrangements on board should be on the floorboards!

    In terms of length, the skerry was 15 1/2 feet long and it fit very nicely in my front yard. A 16 footer, sure...no problem. 17, yeah. 18 ummmm.....and 19, no way.
    Still offering: Let me know when to drop it off at Suisun, you can take the Walkabout for a day and try fixed seat, slide seat, standing rowing and sleeping on the floor. I also have hatchet blade sculls, spoon blade sculls, and some shorter oars.

    -Rick

  6. #111
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Thanks guys!...rgthorn and Amish Rob! Pretty sure I'll take you up on this after Christmas!

    As for the Whitehall....of course I'd love a 16 foot whitehall. But to purchase one is thousands of dollars and to build one is well beyond my skill level.

  7. #112
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    Nov 2018
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    New Orleans, LA, USA
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    113

    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    I don't mean to be disrespectful, but sometimes skill rises to the challenge. But, still, any wooden boat is a good boat!

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Missoula, MT, USA
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    As for the Whitehall....of course I'd love a 16 foot whitehall. But to purchase one is thousands of dollars and to build one is well beyond my skill level.
    Alan, have you looked at Jim Michalak's LFH17 (plans available on Duckworks here)? It requires 4 sheets of 1/4 inch plywood, so it is a more affordable option. As others have noted, you may surprise yourself with how quickly you develop the necessary skills to build it yourself. I may be mistaken, but I believe the only power tools you would need are a Jigsaw and a drill to build Michalak's version of the LFH17 (or the Butler designs).

    I built one of Flo-Mo's two-sheet faerings (build photos here if you are interested). I am very happy with it! It is fairly low to the water, particularly so when loaded with camping gear (I weigh 200 pounds and tend to pack heavy by most people's standards). The two sheets of plywood for the faering were left over from an abandoned project, so I was adamant about building a two-sheet boat to save money. I looked really hard at the LFH17, and considered buying two more sheets to make it happen, but I already had a 17' swampscott-style dory in my armada. (A Chesapeake Light Craft boat like your former skerry.) I believe the Butler Pacific Troller Dory uses more than two sheets of plywood.

    Paul Fisher has a number of designs using the same stitch-and-glue/taped-seam building method as Michalak's LFH17. The Selway Fisher site (here) also lists the major wood requirements up front, so you can get a sense of how expensive a project may end up being. (My experience is: at least double my estimate...)


    Something to consider in your boat choice: I find having a flat bottom on the boat is really nice for rolling the boat up and down rocky beaches. I can use boat fenders to roll my dory over surprisingly large, barnacle-encrusted rocks. If I am going to be on sandy (or gravel) beaches, then I use an Aere inflatable beach roller. (Full disclosure: my preferred boat for rowing is my round-bottomed Gartside Coastal Rowboat, but my dory IS easier to get up and down rocky beaches.)

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    northwestern Wisconsin
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    9,198

    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    As for the Whitehall....of course I'd love a 16 foot whitehall. But to purchase one is thousands of dollars and to build one is well beyond my skill level.
    Nope. It isn't. How do I know? Because I built one (my Kurylko Alaska, anyway), and it turned out fine. Floats and everything.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  10. #115
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    Nov 2014
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    Seattle, WA
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    A traditionally-build Whitehall is a lovely thing. I have a 17' Whitehall myself. It's a joy to row but not the ideal boat for row cruising I think, as there is little room for sleeping, no built-in flotation, nor much storage room either. And I'd hate to drag it up on a beach. I'm planning to try cruising with it at some point since it's what I have, but if I were starting from a clean sheet of paper I think would want something like a Swampscott dory. Either the traditionally-built Deblois Street Dory from Clint Chase or the stitch-and-glue Northeaster Dory from CLC would work:

    https://www.chase-small-craft.com/deblois-street-dory

    https://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/...inghy-kit.html

    Or perhaps the CLC Skerry since I have a soft spot for double enders:

    https://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/...iling-kit.html

    but lately I have been looking at the 19' cruising version of Drake

    https://www.chase-small-craft.com/drake-rowboat-19

    which really looks like the perfect row cruising boat to me. Of course I say this with no actual experience. Just many, many hours of day dreaming.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  11. #116
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    The Garden State
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    8,785

    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Thanks guys!...rgthorn and Amish Rob! Pretty sure I'll take you up on this after Christmas!

    As for the Whitehall....of course I'd love a 16 foot whitehall. But to purchase one is thousands of dollars and to build one is well beyond my skill level.

    Have you considered one of Dave Gentrey's Skin on Frame Whitehalls?

    http://gentrycustomboats.com/Whitehallpage.html

    I am in the process of building one of his kayaks. I will hopefully be done wed as all I have left is the coaming and paint. It has been an extremely easy build, so much so that I am going to do his Piankatank Pram next.
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  12. #117
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    Apr 2010
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    Fairfield, CA
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    I had a SOF LFH17 for a while, and just sold a 14.5 foot Whitehall. IMO both of these boats were too small or not configured well for camp aboard row cruising. The Whitehall seating and daggerboard did not leave room for sleeping, even if I added floorboards. The reason I built the Walkabout was because the Whitehall was not big enough. The LFH had a flat bottom panel, but too narrow for sleeping on. Also it was not so stable, I could imagine waking up not quite remembering where I was and tipping it over. I am 6' 4" and 200 lb, I thought I was a big guy but you are 50% bigger than me! I am comfortable sleeping on the sole of the Walkabout, but the space is 26" wide and your shoulders might not even fit that. My main point is just that you will need to try out some of the designs to see if they work for you.
    If I were to pick a solo row cruiser again it would be the Drake 19, that just has the space and the speed for a nice cruising boat.

  13. #118
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    Jan 2009
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    northwestern Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    The Alaska's sleeping platform is 10' long and 4' wide...

    At 18', it sounds like you'd have just enough room. I can tell you exactly which mistakes to make as you build it, and in what order!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  14. #119
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    Nov 2017
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    Missoula, MT, USA
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    IMO both of these boats were too small or not configured well for camp aboard row cruising.
    Ah, yes! I agree the boats I mentioned are too small to sleep aboard. They would, however, be a bit cheaper and faster to build.

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    MT rower, I've stared at your Flo-Mo Faering pictures MANY times! I originally intended to build Flo-Mo's ROMAX, and I still might. I'm a little bit concerned that the two-sheet boats are a tich small for a guy my size.

    I'm not a Jim Michalak fan but LFH 17 is VERY different from most of his stuff. Hmmm. Worth considering. I can fit a 17 footer in the front yard. I can't fit a 19 footer.

  16. #121
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    The Alaska's sleeping platform is 10' long and 4' wide...

    At 18', it sounds like you'd have just enough room. I can tell you exactly which mistakes to make as you build it, and in what order!

    Tom
    HAHA!.....nice to know. I have my doubts, though. I'd consider something like Alaska for a SECOND boat.....after I stitch 'n glued up a first one.

  17. #122
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    I had a SOF LFH17 for a while, and just sold a 14.5 foot Whitehall. IMO both of these boats were too small or not configured well for camp aboard row cruising. The Whitehall seating and daggerboard did not leave room for sleeping, even if I added floorboards. The reason I built the Walkabout was because the Whitehall was not big enough. The LFH had a flat bottom panel, but too narrow for sleeping on. Also it was not so stable, I could imagine waking up not quite remembering where I was and tipping it over. I am 6' 4" and 200 lb, I thought I was a big guy but you are 50% bigger than me! I am comfortable sleeping on the sole of the Walkabout, but the space is 26" wide and your shoulders might not even fit that. My main point is just that you will need to try out some of the designs to see if they work for you.
    If I were to pick a solo row cruiser again it would be the Drake 19, that just has the space and the speed for a nice cruising boat.
    OK, good to know!

    BTW, the Mrs. just pulled a measuring tape across my back and straight line, outside one shoulder to the other is 26 inches. So I'd need 30 inches across to be comfortable.
    Last edited by Alan H; 11-24-2020 at 06:08 PM.

  18. #123
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    Mar 2010
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    central cal
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    Rick, is your Walkabout longer than the average bear, or standard size? Curious, is all.

    One day I may actually make it all the way up there for a messabout and I can see her in person...

  19. #124
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    Default Re: Talk to me about row-cruising

    8% stretch Rob, and yes we have to make actual contact at some point. Maybe the world will be calmer this summer (dreaming...).

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