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Thread: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

  1. #1
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    Default Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Hello All

    When it comes to varnishing, you can absolutely identify me as a TOTAL NOVICE! I have never varnished anything in my life.

    Tom Blake specified that we use "spar varnish" in his 1933 Modern Mechanix article, in his 1937 Popular Mechanics article and his 1939 Popular Science article. He used the specific words, "spar varnish". Words have meaning. Sometimes, words change meaning over time. Since Tom specified this at the very end of the age of sail, I take his words to mean spar varnish in the context of that period. So a long oil varnish, which remains flexible on the mast and booms, as they flex under the weight of the wind on the sails. A brittle varnish that cracks, flakes or delaminates is useless to maintaining the spars.

    In researching this, my expectation was to discover a varnish with a recipe which can be clearly dated before the 1930's and that would align to the application onto spars in a functional manner. This eventually brought me to Le Tonkinois. It's advertised as a 1920's codification of a centuries old recipe.

    Here are the characteristics, most important criteria first, that sealed (pun fully intended) the deal for me:

    1) It is advertised as non-slip/non-skid when wet. I almost fell out of my chair when I read this. We surfers know that the ancients didn't use wax. When Doc Ball was asked, in an on camera interview in the 1990's what they used back in the day, he said "I really cannot remember". That is understandable, 60 years on. We have all been on a quest to re-discover this material. Right now, I think this is it!!!! Le Tonk or similar very long oil spar varnish. Doc was a Tom Blake contemporary, famous in his own right, surfed together with Tom in the 1930's.
    2) It is advertised as among the easiest of varnishes to apply. As a novice, this really spoke to me.
    3) Protects the board from water.
    4) Doesn't crack.
    5) easily renewed, albeit needing more frequent touch ups.

    Okay, so why am I here? Did I mention novice??

    I purchased the LT Bio Impression (a sealer), the LT Potee (filler putty), Le Tonkinois Classic and LT Gelomat. I also purchased some linseed oil soap, as well as Jen Foam brushes, one inch. After reading lots of brush maintenance letters here on WBF, I know that brush maintenance is going to escape me, so Jen Foam it is.

    I think what I am supposed to do is
    a) wash the board thoroughly with the linseed oil soap.
    b) wet sand the raised fibers until smooth. Question: is 180 grit for final grit okay?
    c) re-wash with linseed.
    d) acetone wipe (or should I use naphtha?) to get the last bit of oils that might be present. Note: Tom specified Jeffery's Marine Glue for all seams. A consult with the MSDS indicated that Jeffery's is >90% bitumen (asphalt). Since the high temperatures of Jeffery's scared the poo out of me, I substituted Henry's 208, which is a mix of asphalt and Stoddard's Solvent. Once dry, what remains is the asphalt, but without the scary temperatures. This means there is a fine line of asphalt visible. I hope to stuff that with Interlux Seam Compound (brown) but that is a question for another day!
    e) let chemical wipe dry.
    f) Apply a coat of LT Bio Impression
    g) Sand with 180, as Le Tonk specifies. Then wipe with water dampened lint free cloth.
    h) More coats of LT Bio Impression, 24 hours between coats. Instead of wasting what will be left in the tin, I expect to apply a bunch of coats here. In fact to the limit of the tin. The Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard is roughly 35 ft^2, getting me ~ 5 to 8 coats. There was some advertising literature which stated that after the first saturating coat, the rate of application extends from 20m^2/liter to 30m^2/liter.
    i) LT Potee clear filler, for those awkward dents due to fubar construction errors. Sand level.
    j) Switch now to Le Tonk Classic. A new brush each time, no sanding. Again, anywhere between 5 and 8 coats, depending on rate.
    k) A potential final coat of LT Classic mixed with Le Tonkinois Gelomat, to be used to reduce gloss. The MSDS stated this was naphtha, but gave an unusual CAS (chemical abstracts service) number. Instead of trying to save 14 cents by purchasing generic naphtha, I went with the vendor specified material.

    Is there something wrong, something extra recommended? Steps I skipped? Have at it please! Any and all comments will be welcomed. Please note that I already have the Le Tonk on hand, so substituting Epifanes, Pettit or your favorite varnish like Man o' War is not likely to happen here.

    You will note one very specific thing that is NOT on my list of priorities. A high gloss piece of brightwork, the envy of all at the marina! If it ends up looking good at the end, sure, that will be nice. But if it doesn't, it will be okay too. My top priority is non-skid, please let that happen oh ye surf gods!!

    Brad

    PS: Here are some photographs of the state of the build
    MechFastener.jpg
    Inset is Ms. Vera Campbell, holding her TEAK Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard, one she obtained directly from Tom. Of interest are the mechanical fasteners. I have made every effort to do the same for my board. The decks are fastened with fasteners, not epoxy. The black line down the center will most likely be filled with Interlux Seam Compound (brown).

    Stern.jpg
    The stern (tail) block, with the rails attached.

    ViewFromStern.jpg
    view from the stern looking forward. You can see the asphalt squeeze out where the deck meets the rails. Dolfinite where the ribs meet the deck, as this is internal. Limber notches near the central battens, as specified. Lightening holes, just as Tom designed them.

    20200820_142100.jpg
    view from the bow (nose). The bow (nose) block gets special treatment as described by Tom, that is still to come.

    If you want to see more, please visit my Instagram Page http://www.instagram.com/tomblakesurfboard
    Lots more images and detailed description of what's going on.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    For typical varnish work the first coat will raise the grain no matter what you do. My technique is to use a thinned (50%) varnish/turpentine ( not "turps" that is different) as a sealer coat or two and then lightly sand that for tooth and apply varnish. Standard is 8-10 coats sanding between coats (I use #280 grit)

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    I've been using Le Tonkinois for about 10 years and have been very happy with it. It has a couple of nice properties that differ from more traditional varnishes. One is that you can don't have to strictly maintain the wet edge, you can go back and work into the wet area. Another is you don't have to sand between coats. Of course if you're not pleased with the last coat, then knock it down. On a warm summer day I can get 2 coats but usually it takes an overnight dry between coats.
    Last edited by SBrookman; 08-21-2020 at 04:56 PM.
    Steve B
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    "If a man must be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most." E. B. White

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    I don't always sand between every coat but as a rule it is part of the fairing process so I just do it. Otherwise any flaw is magnified with each succeeding coat.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    I use it for my leeboards since 2006, sanding between coats isn't necessary when you apply the coat within 24 hours of the previous one. I only sand between the last coats to get a good smooth shine on it. It's more or less non skid, which means that it's not as slippery as other varnishes .
    I like the product especially because you can apply it in any temperature, cold circumstances are not a big problem ( just thin it very slightly).
    An example;
    IMG_0249.jpg

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Hello DutchPP!

    Very pleased to hear from someone who has first hand experience with the material.

    A smooth shine will be inversely proportional to the anti-skid nature. Surface roughness combined with the coefficient of friction of the mating surfaces (the soles of my feet and Le Tontinois) are the determining factors. A mirror smooth, hard surface with a sheen of water will be very slippery. A matte finish is indicative of surface roughness, and when combined with a softer material like LT, should reduce the slickness. Just supposition on my part

    Have you tried to stand on the surface of your leeboard? When wet? Your first hand experience, in saying "not as slippery" is the data point I am after, if you don't mind. How do you know "not as slippery"?

    Thanksmin advance
    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Hello Canoeyawl

    As a novice, I intend to stay in lane. For me, on this project, I must stick to the Le Tonkinois product line

    The sealer will be LT Bio Impression http://www.tarsmell.com/bioimpression.html

    The varnish is Le Tonkinois Original http://www.tarsmell.com/letonkinois_original.html. It is on this page that it is specified not to sand between coats, just wipe down. I have read, on another WBF post, that Le Tonk Original/Classic tends to gum up sandpaper and therefore should be done wet.

    We are urged to not thin either product. Yet it is clear, from the manufacturer, that the solvent is "white spirits" (aka Stoddard's Solvent or Mineral Spirits). It even says this on the tin, albeit in French.

    The final is mixed with LT Gelomat http://www.tarsmell.com/gelomat.html, essentially naphtha, to produce the matte finish. This should improve the non-skid nature of the finish.

    After also reading literally hundreds of posts here on "varnish" that there are many varying opinions, practices and procedures. Certainly as one varnish is substituted for another, like switching to, say, Epifanes from Man o' War.

    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Hi Steve B

    Are you using LT #1 or LT Original/Classic? Have you sanded in between coats? Did it gum up your paper?

    Your description of the application methodology was an important criteria for me. I most likely will FUBAR the application and therefore hoped for something more forgiving.

    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    IMG_0192.jpg
    This is an example of the backside of the leeboard, I want them "shiny" to reduce drag so I will sand between the last coats. I don't walk on my leeboards I'm sorry
    IMG_1317.jpg
    Sorry the pic is on it's side, this is my cockpit as you can see it's a combination of varnished and unvarnished teak. I have experimented with different varnishes here ( Epiphanes, Interlux etc.) and went back to Le Tonkinois for two reasons, it's easier to applicate and it's not as slippery as the other varnishes.
    It's not comparable to a non skid deck, but when it's wet you can walk on it without slipping ( with shoes or barefoot).
    IMG_1770.jpg
    The forward hatch, the same story.
    By the way I've never used LT Gelomat, I would advice you to try it without Gelomat first, the worst that could happen is that it's possibly is to slippery and you would have to apply 1 extra coat with Gelomat.

    Nice board by the way please post a picture when it's ready. Good luck with your trials.
    Last edited by dutchpp; 08-22-2020 at 02:56 PM.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    DutchPP, you wrote:

    It's not comparable to a non skid deck, but when it's wet you can walk on it without slipping ( with shoes or barefoot).

    Thank You Sir, that is precisely the data point. Please, oh ye surfgods, let this man's words be true!!

    Then you wrote:

    By the way I've never used LT Gelomat, I would advice you to try it without Gelomat first, the worst that could happen is that it's possibly is to slippery and you have to apply 1 extra coat with Gelomat.

    Roger that! I will try a test piece long before the final coat. Yet that advice is quite sound!


    Nice board by the way please post a picture when it's ready. Good luck with your trials.[/QUOTE]

    Thank you! I have been at this build seemingly forever.

    BTW, color me jealous of your boat. Beautiful!

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    I've used both, haven't noticed a big difference. Now using #1 as it doesn't skin over in can like the original. Only sanded between coats when needed and if fully cured doesn't gum up the sand paper. Don't varnish in direct sunlight if you're going over fiberglass, you'll likely get bubbles.

    It's not slippery and we used on my wife's SUP:
    SUP8.jpg
    SUP11.jpg
    Steve B
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    PAYTON 13' Pea Pod

    RIVUS 16' Melonseed


    "If a man must be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most." E. B. White

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Thank you for your quick reply Steve. Your first had SUP data has convinced me. That a long oil spar varnish was the 1930's method.

    No fiberglass on my board. This is a very true to period build. Tom didn't specify fiberglass, so I won't use it. It would be an anachronism anyway.

    The LT is going over bare wood, first the LT Bio Impression sealer, then the LT Original/Classic.

    Thank you again!
    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    It's good stuff and you can hot coat it. Personally if I wanted nonskid I'd likely ignor most standard varnish practices and just do light sanding with a quick tack down, small bubbles and dust particles should help the nonskid.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Blake Surfboard View Post
    Hello Canoeyawl





    The varnish is Le Tonkinois Original http://www.tarsmell.com/letonkinois_original.html. It is on this page that it is specified not to sand between coats, just wipe down. I have read, on another WBF post, that Le Tonk Original/Classic tends to gum up sandpaper and therefore should be done wet.


    Brad
    Interesting.. On this page it tell you to give a light sanding between coats http://www.letonkinoisvarnish.co.uk/varfaq.html . I know from reading elsewhere, this is because the EU forced a change in formula about 10 years ago..

    On this page they specifically sell Scotchbrite sanding pads for the purpose...
    http://www.letonkinoisvarnish.co.uk/varprices.html
    Just an amateur bodging away..

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Quote Originally Posted by The Q View Post
    Interesting.. On this page it tell you to give a light sanding between coats http://www.letonkinoisvarnish.co.uk/varfaq.html . I know from reading elsewhere, this is because the EU forced a change in formula about 10 years ago..

    On this page they specifically sell Scotchbrite sanding pads for the purpose...
    http://www.letonkinoisvarnish.co.uk/varprices.html
    The first page you referenced does mention the change in regulation and the recommendation to key the surfaces between coats. The second page referenced shows their recommended Scotch Brite pads and also Oxalic Acid for preparing the surfaces. 100% correct!

    Thank you!!! You have likely saved me from disaster!!!

    I still have a few weeks before I (nervously) begin the evolution and comments such as this are helpful!!

    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    I must be doing it wrong for the last 10 years . Don't worry there will be no disaster.
    Last edited by dutchpp; 08-25-2020 at 01:13 PM.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    Don't worry there will be no disaster.
    The parallels to the Hindenburg are astonishing. Both have a rigid frame, and are filled with a gas, so as to float in their environment.

    The newsreel camera men crank away and we hear "Oh the humanity" as he applies the first dab of Le Tonk!

    Hahahaha
    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Note that in the 1930's the preferred marine varnish was made from Copal resin...
    Nice stuff that.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Hi Canoeyawl

    Thank you for that tip!

    My intention has always been and continues to be authenticity in the making. Anyone can attach a few boards together with 55 gallons of epoxy, coat it with a fiberglass and resin goop, and then call it a kookbox. Yes, it would be. My intention is to follow Tom's direction in all things, making the experience and board genuine. A Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard as Tom Blake calls it. For example, Tom specifies the inside to be coated with "tar".
    IMG_20200825_130200_617.jpg



    So after a stroll around the internet, looking at copal varnish, I found a few things

    There is "copal varnish" by Langlow https://palacechemicals.co.uk/shop/e...copal-varnish/ Likely this is not what you mean. Aside from the name of the varnish, no where within the body of the text does it state "copal" content. The price, when compared to actual, genuine copal varnishes indicates that if there is any copal in there, it is in miniscule portions.

    Which brings us to a luthier's Copal Varnish. No doubt this is the real stuff, the price is in the stratosphere. Being made by and for luthiers, the quantities are small and the prices huge. Perhaps this is the material you mean?

    One can also purchase amber and or copal to cook one's own varnish. The luthier boards, similar to this one, offer several concoctions. Gum Turpentine, linseed oil, copal and an open flame! What could possibly go wrong!! I suppose that is very possible to make your own, but quite unlikely that is what Tom was trying to tell us. Tom was trying to invent a modern surfboard, using common (1930's) wooden boat materials.

    Jeffery's Marine Glue, stated by name in one of Tom's articles, puzzled the surfing community. Once Inidentified it as asphalt, there were expressions of "OH, so that's how water was kept out". This community needs no introduction to Jeffery's.

    rj1922_Literary_Digest_April_p45.jpg
    This ad, from 1922, shows Valspar being used on surfboards and endorsed by Duke Kahanamoku. THE Duke Kahanamoku. But this puzzled our surfing community until just now, when I discovered true spar varnish. Varnish today is hard and shiny. Not good for traction. Yet this ad exists. Why? Because the definition of what spar varnish is, changed. Tom specified "spar varnish". He meant the soft long oil, flexible varnish used on booms and masts for the preservation of wood and because it afforded great traction. Just as the advert shows. Just as many period photographs show. No need for wax or other non-skid methods like sugar/salt in the topcoat. Slap some spar varnish on and you are good to go, says Tom. Leaving out wax, a critical non slip component of modern surfing, has puzzled us for decades. Tom was introducing surfing to the world. How could he leave wax out???

    IF, and that is a big IF, true copal varnish was used on "spars", as Tom indicates, and further that it possesses non-skid characteristics, as Duke and all the imagery implies, then this is worth pursuing. I chose Le Tonkinois, not because Tom identified it by name, but because it has all of the criteria specified, to include the age of the recipe. Non-skid is a critical, if not the pre-eminent criteria.

    I am all ears Canoeyawl. Please do expand on your tip. You have my attention!

    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    For those who have used Le Tonkinois a lot before: is it true what they say about it not flaking and peeling up with age like other varnish will when it starts to get old? Someone once told me that it won't flake off like other varnish will, it'll just dull with age and then you just give it a bit of a buffing, lay on a fresh coat to shine it up, and you're good to go. Sounds too good to be true. What say you?
    "And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by..."

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    I only thought you may be interested in what was typically considered "spar varnish" in that era. Copal varnish has a beautiful appearance, unlike any modern varnish in my opinion.

    Interesting connection here to Valspar...
    "An article in the May 1863 New York Coachmakers Magazine[/i] reported that Stimson, Valentine & Co. of Boston was New England's largest manufacturer of varnish. The firm occupied four separate buildings, each used for a distinct manufacturing operation, with a distinct 7 story building in Boston. The article noted, "The principal ingredients used are gum copal, linseed oil, and spirits of turpentine: these articles form the bulk of all varnishes; but in addition to these, the following are a few of the many other ingredients used to obtain the various kinds wanted, viz.: sandarach, shellac, mastic, Venice turpentine, mastic in tears, dried copperas, white copperas, litharge, sugar of lead, alcohol, gum aurum, amber, &c., &c.; but the most prominent of all is the gum copal. This article exudes spontaneously from two trees, the Rhus Copallinum and the Eleocarpus Copalisferus, the first of which grows in South America, the latter in the East Indies. A third species of copal-tree grows on the coast of Guinea." In 1866 the Valentine brothers became sole owners of the firm and then in 1870 the firm relocated to Brooklyn, New York - with its office in Manhattan. It retained an office Boston. In 1906 "Valspar," reported to be the first "clear varnish" was developed and in 1932 Valentine & Co. became a subsidiary of the new ly formed, and the name we recognize as Valspar Corporation. I also read that until 1835 American coaches used polishing varnish (as was and may still be used for pianos). A Mr. Lawrence, a coachmaker in New York, discovered that English carriages which had superior varnish had brush marks and were not polished. He began the importation and then the secret process for manufacturing English varnish shortly thereafter. It was in 1870 that Valentine announced it had developed a varnish superior to imported varnish. IIRC it was the Valspar company that had noted the excellent ability of Omar Needham, when he was at Orvis, to apply its varnish to rods. In sum, the fact that Valentine made copal varnish and was the largest varnish manufacturer in New England, and after its move to New York perhaps the largest in the country, would lead me to conclude that it is likely that Mr. Leonard and others were using its coach varnishes. Yes, this or both more and less than you or anyone else would care to know about the subject but it's all I could find on short order. Charlie"

    http://classicflyrodforum.com/forum/...ic.php?t=12976
    It appears to be available from India at not unreasonable prices, with or without added UV inhibitors (these are good in marine varnish, it is expensive and often what drives the price of "spar varnish"
    Anyway,
    importing it from India into California might be almost impossible

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    TBS,
    another hobby of me is the building of violins. One of the great secrets of the ultimate violin is the finish.
    The varnishes used are usually kept secret by most builders.
    The are however books that describe the content of these varnishes and most of the builders "brew" their own varnishes.
    The advantage of a home brew varnish is that any additive can be added ( including Copal and other exotic resins) for a specific effect.
    These contents can be ordered online.
    One of the builders in my group brew her own varnish for a specific effect on her Cello, she achieved an excellent result.
    It is however a time consuming and somewhat dangerous process.
    I would stick to Le Tonkinois for my board
    Last edited by dutchpp; 08-26-2020 at 02:19 AM.

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    I would stick to Le Tonkinois for my board
    No worries on that point. I've already purchased all of the components that comprise the Le Tonkinois system. It will not go unused. Canoeyawl brought up a historical point re: copal and I thought it to be worthy of investigation, even if only for curiosity!

    Today, I experienced my first test application of the Bio Impression, which is the sealer.

    I prepared the surface by wiping it down with VM&P Naphtha to remove residues and oils on a TEST PIECE. This has the Interlux Brown seam compound in a joint, replicating Tom's direction. The seam contains: Cotton Wicking and Asphalt, with the Seam Putty over the top on one side, while the other bares the asphalt in the joint.

    I opened the can of Le Tonkinois Bio Impression, which was under vacuum seal. Using a syringe, i swiftly extracted a modest quantity and resealed the tin. Permit me to say it has a pleasing odor. Not off putting at all.

    I brushed the BI on with a foam brush. My concerns:
    1) Would the xylene in the Interlux Seam Compound repel the BI? No, the BI easily coated and remained on the seam putty
    2) Would the BI adhere to the asphalt? No issues here either.

    I was slightly surprised that the BI actually took a bit of the seam putty away and onto the foam brush. Not much, but it was visible on the brush. Hopefully, the sealer acts like a binding agent for subsequent coats.

    I was very pleased with the application on the wood. It was pleasant to work with. I'm sure my application method is in dire need of correction, but all in all, I'm quite happy.

    I think this is going to work!!! Yippee!!

    Brad

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Of course it will work, you worry to much

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    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    Of course it will work, you worry to much
    BITTEN by the DEW

    Things were going great! I had four coats of Le Tonkinois Huiles Bio Impression (sealer/base) down with another two of the Le Tonkinois Vernis (classic varnish). It sparkled in the light!

    Went to check the morning after the third coat of Vernis, to see a patchy matte finish in parts, shine in others. So I took some 400 grit and gently sanded the entire surface. After careful cleaning with alcohol and a tack cloth, I laid down a forth coat. Disappointingly, the next morning revealed the surface to be almost entirely matte with dew droplets clearly observable to the eye and wet to the touch. Dang! Bitten by the dew.

    With the water temperature dropping to 59F (15C) and my end point at 55, I still have 4 coats of Vernis to go on the bottom deck. I have sadly concluded that there may not be a splash until spring. I’m comfortable that the 8 coats of le Tonk have done their job on the top deck and rails. That deck has the water tight function, but just doesn’t have that sparkle.

    There are really only two ways to control dew. (1) increase the temperature of the object above the dew point so dew cannot form on the surface (2) Increase the dew point of the ambient air by (a) reducing humidity in the air or (b) by increasing the ambient air temperature.

    Since the board is outside and tented, it will be virtually impossible to increase the dew point of the air by reducing ambient humidity. Anything I extract from the air via dehumidification will be equalized by the external tent environment. I could try to increase the surface temperature of the board by irradiating it with photons. A series of halogen lights along the length of the board might do it. I could similarly try infrared lamps along the length. These simultaneously raise the ambient air temperature, albeit slightly.

    Any of these methods just seems like shoveling against the tide with a teaspoon. The only reason for the sparkle is cosmetic. At this time of year, the surf spots are all but deserted anyway. No one will see that sparkle except for me. So why fuss over it. I will flip the board and proceed with the bottom deck.

    Come next season, however, I’d like the board to sparkle for the gawkers. Let them drool over it, just not on it! Would another coat over the top of the matte finish turn it back to sparkle? Do I need to lightly sand or should I really hit it hard? There is plenty of time for opinions, spring is > 100 days away.

    Brad
    Building the July 1937 Popular Mechanics
    Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard
    Patented by Tom Blake in 1932

    www.instagram.com/tomblakesurfboard

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Suffolk County, New York, USA
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    So I was tending to our chickens, and the heat lamp came on. It was at that moment the light bulb glowed ever so dimly over my head, literally and figuratively

    And so I did this:

    20201120_150713.jpg
    Edit: no, I did not turn the world on edge!

    IMG_20201120_184054_556.jpg

    Total cost $42.00 Time to put together ~1 Hours.

    Its first test is happening right now. Dew is forming on our cars, but no dew has (yet) formed on the board.

    I will check again at sunrise and update.

    Brad
    Last edited by Tom Blake Surfboard; 11-20-2020 at 10:19 PM. Reason: Because the Forum does not rectify images properly
    Building the July 1937 Popular Mechanics
    Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard
    Patented by Tom Blake in 1932

    www.instagram.com/tomblakesurfboard

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    The board looks great Brad!

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Suffolk County, New York, USA
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    The board looks great Brad!
    Thank you, I am trying.

    There was dew everywhere this morning at dawn (6:16 AM, 42N Latitude) EXCEPT for the board. Bone dry!! Yippee!

    Temperature of objects away from the light 44 (6.6C). Temperature on the board, directly under the light 90 (32.2C), and at the edge of the board, between lights 61 (16.1C).

    This is a good thermal rise over ambient (10C over ambient!) and will certainly let me keep going without the dew affecting me!

    Brad
    Building the July 1937 Popular Mechanics
    Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard
    Patented by Tom Blake in 1932

    www.instagram.com/tomblakesurfboard

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Suffolk County, New York, USA
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Le Tonkinois for the Tom Blake Surfboard

    Keeping the dew off of the varnish permitted it to dry to a lovely shine

    9 total coats. 4 Huiles Bio Impression. 5 Le Tonk Vernis.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CH5kr2nH...d=ot1fgk4bdh5x

    Brad

    As a total beginner, I was intimidated by this process. Le Tonkinois has been fairly easy to deal with. Just my opinion, your mileage may vary.
    Building the July 1937 Popular Mechanics
    Hollow Hawaiian Surfboard
    Patented by Tom Blake in 1932

    www.instagram.com/tomblakesurfboard

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