Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 910
Results 316 to 350 of 350

Thread: Building the CoPogy 18

  1. #316
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bellingham, Wa, USA
    Posts
    3,833

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Thanks Ben, I had actually considered that but didn't list it. The reason I had discarded the idea was that the liquid-tight ENT tubing that I had been considering has fittings that would be too big to fit inside the hollow part. But, now that I think some more about it, it might work if I just angled the conduit out at top and bottom and dispensed with the 90 degree fittings.

    That's what I was imagining. I wouldn't even bother with actual conduit, use some PEX water line. Very easy to cut and trim. Glue two staves together, drill the hole, then ziptie the end of the pipe in place over the hole. Assemble the rest of the spar. snip the zipties and shape the spar.

    I just came up with that idea. It seems clever, but in reality?
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  2. #317
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    Maybe place a piece of cotton rope when you glue up the mast. Pull it through after clamping to wipe off internal epoxy drips.
    Good suggestion.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  3. #318
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    That's what I was imagining. I wouldn't even bother with actual conduit, use some PEX water line. Very easy to cut and trim. Glue two staves together, drill the hole, then ziptie the end of the pipe in place over the hole. Assemble the rest of the spar. snip the zipties and shape the spar.

    I just came up with that idea. It seems clever, but in reality?
    Something like that might work. I'll give it some thought.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  4. #319
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Location
    Sveirge (Sweden)
    Posts
    390

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Possibly none. This may perhaps allow for an easier way to apply luff tension on the throat cringle.

    Mostly it is kind of traditional and shippy-looking and it is a great detail from William Garden, whose work always impressed me.
    Thank you. I can imagine the steel arms removes any stretch that could be in a stropped block, unless maybe dyneema or such. It is a nice detail, nicely executed. Will your sail be laced, mast hoops or in a track?

  5. #320
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by LarixMaximus View Post
    It is a nice detail, nicely executed. Will your sail be laced, mast hoops or in a track?
    Thanks.

    Sail will likely be laced, I think. I haven't decided yet.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  6. #321
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    867

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Hi Alex,
    Going back to #303, your gaff jaws are a fine piece of work. The steel tongue in the jaws keeps the luff of the sail in line with the halliard, which makes it easier to hoist the sail. "Hand, Reef and Steer" by Tom Cunliffe is a good reference. Thinking of the slot that the tongue pivots in being square to the spar on the lower side, is the gaff likely to go below the horizontal (capsize) now and then? Mine used to sometimes, on Eun Mara Islesburgh, intentionally or otherwise. (You hoist the sail by raising the gaff horizontally first, until the luff is taut, then raise the peak. You lower it vertically, so the weight brings it down.)
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #322
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Hi Alex,
    Going back to #303, your gaff jaws are a fine piece of work. The steel tongue in the jaws keeps the luff of the sail in line with the halliard, which makes it easier to hoist the sail. "Hand, Reef and Steer" by Tom Cunliffe is a good reference. Thinking of the slot that the tongue pivots in being square to the spar on the lower side, is the gaff likely to go below the horizontal (capsize) now and then? Mine used to sometimes, on Eun Mara Islesburgh, intentionally or otherwise. (You hoist the sail by raising the gaff horizontally first, until the luff is taut, then raise the peak. You lower it vertically, so the weight brings it down.)
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Thanks Ian. You make a good point about the tongue aligning the throat cringle and the halyard. When the time comes, I plan to take a full size sketch of the gaff jaws to the sailmaker so that they can get that aligned properly.

    With regard to how far down the gaff peak will lower, compared to the throat, it may not be apparent from the pictures, but the slot on the underside of the gaff is cut back to allow the gaff to pivot well below horizontal.

    I have essentially zero experience sailing with a traditional gaff rig (my balanced lug is not quite the same), but yesterday I was out sailing with friends on their new, much larger, gaff-rigged cutter. They are still learning the vagaries of the boat and the rig and we hoisted and lowered the main a couple of times before we got a routine figured out. I learned a lot.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  8. #323
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    867

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Thanks Alex. That's alright then. I may have misinterpreted something. That's exactly what I was talking about.
    I enjoyed sailing Islesburgh. I have never had a chance to sail on another gaffer....
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #324
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    So here is the cable-inside-the-mast solution I ended up with.

    I was wandering through the home despot plumbing section, looking for something else, when I chanced on coils of polyethylene tubing, water tubing of some sort I think. ½” OD, 3/8” ID. Plenty slippery and just enough room to pull coax cable through. I also bought a skinny (1/8” wide) electrician’s fish tape, which slides through easily as well, to pull the coax through.

    I used a few little plastic clamps to secure the tubing to the inside of one of the mast halves. I drilled suitable holes at the tip and above the partners, at a 30 degree angle off vertical so the tubing and coax don’t have too sharp a bend:


    I then glued the two halves together (with suitable blocking, not shown), sliced the excess protruding tubing off and proceeded to 16 and 32 side, and round off the birdsmouth in the usual fashion. Here is what the tip looks like from the outside, along with a little flat I made up and glued on to fasten the VHF aerial bracket to:


    The colour of the thickened epoxy isn’t likely to really match the Fir, even when the Fir is varnished, so I’ll probably end up painting the tip white.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  10. #325
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    809

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Well done on the tubing Alex. I hope to do something similar on mine when I get to it. What is bothering me is the connection through to cabin, it’s a TRailable boat so mast will be up/down a lot. Have you had any ideas? So far I’m thinking a waterproof box on cabintop to make the connection inside but that’s butt ugly.
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 07-25-2021 at 09:54 PM.

  11. #326
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,409

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    That's pretty much what I was thinking of, Alex. Looks great!

  12. #327
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Well done on the tubing Alex. I hope to do something similar on mine when I get to it. What is bothering me is the connection through to cabin, it’s a TRailable boat so mast will be up/down a lot. Have you had any ideas? So far I’m thinking a waterproof box on cabintop to make the connection inside but that’s butt ugly.
    Thanks Andrew.

    This boat will also live most of its life on a trailer. The mizzen is offset from the centreline, and there will be small side decks alongside the cockpit so I was thinking I would make the coax from the mast long enough to make the connection under the side deck, where it would be at least out of the direct rain and spray. I have seen coax connectors outside of the mast on other boats so I assume there are reasonably water-tight versions out there, although I haven't yet got to the stage of tracking them down.

    I will face a similar decision on the main mast with the wiring for the masthead light. I have not yet decided whether to exit the tubing/wiring below the deck or above the deck. Below the deck I face the dilemma of what size to make the partners at the deck. Large enough to accommodate the mast as it is installed for each trip and the fit of the mast will be loose enough that the mast will have some slop. Above the deck and the problem is as you describe. Perhaps I'll work up some kind of mast detail at the partners that uses wedges or blocks of some sort to ensure a snug fit and also leaves room to allow the wiring to slide by as the mast is raised. The termination could then be below decks. I'll have to decide soon, as I am cutting and scarfing together the staves for the main mast right now.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  13. #328
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    That's pretty much what I was thinking of, Alex. Looks great!
    Thanks Hugh!
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  14. #329
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    867

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    ​I had a marine-type plug-in fitting on the deck beside the tabernacle on my Eun Mara Islesburgh. The wire from the mast-head light was in a plastic tube. It came out of the back of the mast, at a suitable angle, and plugged into the fitting. When I left the mast in the tabernacle all the time, I could leave the wire plugged in too. (I couldn't put a mast-head light on Kotik because of the sheave in the mast.)

    Copy of PA180042.jpg

    Ian
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-26-2021 at 05:31 PM. Reason: change photo
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #330
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    809

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Thanks Alex and the pic too Ian.

  16. #331
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    ​I had a marine-type plug-in fitting on the deck beside the tabernacle on my Eun Mara Islesburgh. The wire from the mast-head light was in a plastic tube. It came out of the back of the mast, at a suitable angle, and plugged into the fitting. When I left the mast in the tabernacle all the time, I could leave the wire plugged in too. (I couldn't put a mast-head light on Kotik because of the sheave in the mast.)


    Ian
    Thanks Ian. Something like that is pretty much what I had in mind if I terminate the wiring above the deck.

    I notice in the picture that you have a kind of saddle (not sure of the correct term) for the boom jaws to rest on when the sail is lowered. I've been contemplating whether I need such a thing for the CoPogy rig. My concern is that it might interfere with the downhaul in getting the luff taut, if I put it in the wrong place. On the other hand, it would help in keeping the boom, gaff and sail off the pilothouse top.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  17. #332
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    867

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Hi Alex, Some of the bigger boats like some I have seen at Port Townsend, have a complete ring around the mast to support the boom when it is down, so I used the same idea. Instead of making a complete ring out of 4 pieces, I just made the side pieces for Islesburgh. It worked OK. Other EMs I have seen just let the boom rest on top of the tabernacle. I guess that works OK too. For Kotik, I made the complete ring, on both masts. I didn't bother with the brackets. You can see them in this website photo of the Pacific Swift, although a bit far away. https://www.salts.ca/media2/images/1...aya-swift3.jpg When you hoist the sail, the jaws come up clear of the ring, so you can still use a downhaul.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-30-2021 at 05:49 PM. Reason: typo
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #333
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Thanks Ian. Always ask the man who has one.

    I'll go back to the sail plan and do some careful measuring to figure out where the ring needs to go.

    For the mizzen, a pretty small sail on this boat, I am thinking I will do the same as on my current boat, which is to bring the boom up parallel to the mast and furl the sail around them both.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  19. #334
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    867

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Yes, that seems to be the usual practice with the lug-yawl crowd, as on your Fire Drake.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #335
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Setting up the table saw to cut the birdsmouths for a birdsmouth mast takes longer than actually cutting the birdsmouths, if you know what I mean.



    Working on the main mast now. Last spar of 6.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  21. #336
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Been over a month since I posted. Visit from my daughter and granddaughter for the first time in many, many months and a brief trip in Fire-Drake to the Discovery Islands at the north end of the Strait of Georgia (mostly no wind but some time with too much wind) took up much of the time, but I did make progress on the build.

    My main goal was to get the spars built outside, while the weather allowed, and I managed that. The last spar was the main mast – the longest at over 20 feet, and the largest, at 4 inches in diameter. It is also the most complex in terms of tapers and internal blocking.

    I made a bunch of supports and levelled them up on a sort of stringer made of 2 X 4’s fastened together. Here is the first glue-up, done in 2 halves . . .


    . . . before taking it apart to make and fit the internal blocking, tubing for masthead light wiring and end plugs:



    Then comes the 16-siding, the 32-siding and the inside-out-belt-sander-belt rounding rig:


    Finally, gluing the two halves together, making and fastening on the cleats for the standing rigging, and putting on a couple of coats of sealer before wrapping it up for storage until installation, some time next spring.


    I may get some varnishing done on the spars this fall yet, if the weather cooperates. In the meantime, I have started fairing and sanding the outside of the hull preparatory to glassing it. Lots of time with the long boards.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  22. #337
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,409

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Looking really good, Alex Glad Fire-Drake is getting some exercise, too.

  23. #338
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Looking really good, Alex Glad Fire-Drake is getting some exercise, too.
    Thanks Hugh.

    It dawned on me, during my short cruise, that it might just be the last significant cruise in Fire-Drake, if I launch the new boat when I hope to next spring. Felt strange.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  24. #339
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Utah and PNW
    Posts
    2,286

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Looking good, Alex. Is that a birdsmouth inside a birdsmouth?

  25. #340
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Lesser View Post
    Looking good, Alex. Is that a birdsmouth inside a birdsmouth?
    Thanks Dave.

    Yes it is (or rather, they, are). I needed fairly long blocking in way of the standing rigging attachment points and I also wanted to run the tubing up the middle. Rather than make it solid and try to drill a long hole, it seemed simpler to just to make more birdsmouth pieces with thick walls. Once you have your sizes and procedures figured out, it goes pretty quick. For sizing I use the calculator by Gaétan Jetté that is on the Duckworks site, which you can also download and run on your computer.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  26. #341
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    16,540

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Looking just great!
    I find spar making to be one of the most pleasurable aspects of boat building.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  27. #342
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Looking just great!
    I find spar making to be one of the most pleasurable aspects of boat building.
    Thanks Rich. I agree! You get lots of visible progress per hour of work and you end up with a bunch of nearly-finished articles.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  28. #343
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    867

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Nice job, Alex. On your "birdsmouth in a birdsmouth" blocking, it looks like you tapered the staves from the inside, which is good. I "fishtailed" mine (a fishtail in a birdsmouth?). It is said to ease the transition between solid and hollow.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #344
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default

    Well spotted, Ian. I did indeed taper them on the insides. A little work with the round rasp accomplished it in order not to have a stress riser.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  30. #345
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    In between bouts of sanding, adding fairing epoxy, waiting for it to cure, and yet more sanding, I am working away at the steps required to finish building the steel-cored centreboard. My hope is to have the CB completed at about the time I have painted the hull, so that when I flip the hull over, I can use the lifting set-up to lift the CB into place at the same time. We’ll see.

    Here is the CB just before gluing on the last outside lamination, showing the steel core surrounded by the wood:


    Here I have dismounted the drill press to put it on the floor to drill the pivot pin hole. Easier to do that than try to lift the board up to the height of the bench-mounted drill press:


    The assembled board, steel plus wood, now weighs about 150 lbs. I was tired of trying to get my hands under it and tired of getting my fingers pinched, so I finally figured out a way to horse it around. I made up a couple of 2 X 4 clamp sort of things that keep it off the flat floor and also give me something to hang on to. I can lift one end at a time now. It will also stand on its side, too. This picture also shows the initial shaping of the foil section.


    Here is one side of the foil part of the board, roughly shaped. Before you ask, it’s 16” wide and about 48” long. Still have to do the other side.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  31. #346
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,409

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Nice Alex! I like your "handles".

  32. #347
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Thanks Hugh.

    Still not exactly sure how I will go about glassing the thing. Ideally it would be one piece of cloth but I suspect I'll have to do one side at a time overlapping at the leading edge, and do a lot of sanding to recover the proper shape at the nose.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  33. #348
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Utah and PNW
    Posts
    2,286

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Wouldn't it be easier to wrap around the leading edge and fair the trailing edge?

  34. #349
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Aquitaine
    Posts
    1,752

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Lesser View Post
    Wouldn't it be easier to wrap around the leading edge and fair the trailing edge?
    My thought too and do it standing on edge, supported by the pivot hole and a single point near the bottom of the foil.

  35. #350
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,558

    Default Re: Building the CoPogy 18

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Lesser View Post
    Wouldn't it be easier to wrap around the leading edge and fair the trailing edge?
    That is what I was initially thinking, Dave, but I haven't quite figured how to support it while applying glass and epoxy to both sides at once - it is so heavy - but perhaps Andrew's solution . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew2 View Post
    My thought too and do it standing on edge, supported by the pivot hole and a single point near the bottom of the foil.
    . . . would work. I would just have to build a little stand to support the pivot pin.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •