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Thread: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

  1. #1
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    Default Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    As a group with a fair-sized cadre of aging folks... I can't be alone in noticing that some folks seem to be suffering some lessening of cognitive capabilities.

    Not going to mention any names, of course. I don't care how many of you would like me to unfairly impugn Scot's name <G>

    But I'd submit that this might just be a case where Bilge Rats can help each other out. A time for 'if you see something, say something'. If you notice signs... you KNOW the sufferer will be the last to become aware. That's part of the problem. But if you care about the person on any level, and are willing to take a risk, you might find a gentle way to PM them with a suggestion that they get checked out.

    <Shaddup, Pless... I'm not talking about me. Yet.>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  2. #2
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    Cool Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    I'm not crazy yet.
    I've been tested.
    Keep calm, persistence beats resistance.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Ahh, but the strawberries that's.... that's where I had them.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    best troll ever nick!
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    i mean david
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    i mean david
    I'll delete the thread if you get TOO many... <G>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Is this a cry for help?
    If so, get in line behind the blind, one-armed, ambivalent, heretical Muslim in the corner.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Quote Originally Posted by Glen Longino View Post
    Is this a cry for help?

    If so, get in line behind the blind, one-armed, ambivalent, heretical Muslim in the corner.
    You saying I should go ahead and open those eleventeen PM's that have all of a sudden appeared? <G>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    As a group with a fair-sized cadre of aging folks... I can't be alone in noticing that some folks seem to be suffering some lessening of cognitive capabilities.

    Not going to mention any names, of course. I don't care how many of you would like me to unfairly impugn Scot's name <G>

    But I'd submit that this might just be a case where Bilge Rats can help each other out. A time for 'if you see something, say something'. If you notice signs... you KNOW the sufferer will be the last to become aware. That's part of the problem. But if you care about the person on any level, and are willing to take a risk, you might find a gentle way to PM them with a suggestion that they get checked out.

    <Shaddup, Pless... I'm not talking about me. Yet.>

    “get checked out”? Come on Dave, when the slide happens why should anyone tell you when you’re having life? “yes of course I don’t hear you. you’re not enunciating clearly”

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    You saying I should go ahead and open those eleventeen PM's that have all of a sudden appeared? <G>
    Hell yeah...
    The more private they are, the more valuable the message is. The business is called piracy of privacy!��

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    I forget more than I used to.

    But then, I have a lot more to forget.
    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! óCole Porter

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Ah... sometimes emotional health signals are signs of cognitive decline... and sometimes they are just signs of poor emotional or mental health as the norm for a person.

    Forgetting where you put your keys is not a bad sign. Forgetting what your keys are for, the individual keys going to what, but most especially, staring at a handful of keys and wondering, "What do these things do?", that's a bad sign.

    I have cognitive decline. Really. I seem to function fine, I've regressed to the mean. I can't do differential equations in my head any more. I can't operate complex computer applications. I was very sad until I started doing what I could to help others who were in worse shape, not old, just down. Come to think of it, the first person I helped was a forumite, and he introduced me to the forum and bilge. That was a long time ago, time passes quick. But now my body is failing too. I can't even help others now.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    I've wondered that for years, but never seen any signs. Maybe that says something about me

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    No one ever jokes about heart disease, diabetes, cancer, blindness or a range of other commonly age-related conditions. Yet cognitive impairment and hearing loss seem inevitably to cause such witty hilarity ...
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    I forget more than I used to.

    But then, I have a lot more to forget.
    I used to have to hide and pay for forgetfulness, now I can just grow it

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    'Crazy is a relative term' -- John D. MacDonald
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Timely thread.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    It comes for us all, eh?

    An issue of course, is teasing out the "ordinary" cognitive decline affecting most everyone after a point from the various possible pathologies. It's common and expected that people will have more frequent difficulty in swiftly finding a precise word, or mastering a new set of facts or processes. It's common that this degradation will be accompanied by anxiety exactly about the losses too, which can compound them.

    Trending into pathology is different - and capacities tend also to not decay at the same rate. Someone may retain full competence to manage a bank account and monthly bills, but lose discernment about what may be true or deceptive in a discussion. Or the reverse. Some capacities might objectively stay high, but the person be affected by mental health issues like paranoia or depression.

    And yeah, some losses can be observed by the person themselves (which causes them alarm), but others by definition cannot.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Yes... it comes for us all. I watched it from afar with my mom. I watched it up close with my darling m-i-l. She lived with us for most of the final 16 years of her life.

    And we can laugh about it. Nothing wrong with that. But we can't hide from it.

    And some of us here either live alone, or around friends and relatives who won't recognize the signs... or perhaps won't feel comfortable talking about it.

    I hope this thread facilitates even one such conversation.

    At one point, my wise m-i-l pasted this over her bed --

    Laugh at yourself and at life. Not in the spirit of derision or whining self-pity, but as a remedy, a miracle drug, that will ease your pain, cure your depression, and help you to put in perspective that seemingly terrible defeat... Never take yourself too seriously.

    Og Mandino
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Alzheimer's took my dad in '06. While tragic, it was also remarkable; as it stripped his memory and his ability to put words together, it also stripped his capacity to keep a mask up hiding how he felt about things.

    And revealed this blessed, blessed man.

    This lovely guy who was dropping the various capacities which he'd thought had been his identity, but simultaneously was progressively less able to conceal his loveliness anymore. Depths of emotion and caring which when stronger he'd perhaps half-hidden out of fear of personal embarrassment, or perhaps concern for embarrassing the people about whom he cared so much.

    It isn't everyone's experience, to be sure - and Dad wasn't only lovely. But it's worth considering that we are making ourselves as we go through our lives, and ultimately who we have made may be revealed.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Mental Health & age-related cognitive decline

    Similar experience for us. She had always been a treat. Brilliant. Talented architect/designer. Uber-rational (never understood why we didn't all just adopt DVORAK & Esperanto). But with some emotional issues that stunted her in ways. Parental ineptitude. A marriage that was a very bad fit. A debilitating disease that struck early and took away an career she relished. Growing up in a stew of misogyny and sexism she could never understand nor accept. So she had a lot of understandable anger and resentment.

    And that all dropped away at the end, just as you describe. When the fog of anger dissipated, she was able to understand & forgive the whole mob. And she was better able to understand herself and her motivations. And she was far more focused on remembering the good things and times. Of course there was a flip side. For example - she could no longer concentrate enough to read fiction. And that might have been her favorite thing in life. OTOH, it opened a door. She, instead, loved to be read to. So her daughter & I spent a lot of time doing just that. And it provided more opportunities for her to both reminisce and to slide up to various issues she was still confronting... and discuss them.

    But I wish we'd been more savvy about what the onset of Alzheimeers, Parkinson's, and Dementia looked like. Our ignorance left her adrift and confused/scared to mention it... for longer than I'd wish.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

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