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Thread: 200 bucks, yes or no?

  1. #36
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    oh no he dihn't!

  2. #37
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    And I'll say there are different concepts of "sharp"
    You could be right. After all, I've only been doing this since 1972. Maybe I haven't figured out what sharp really is...
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #38
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    dang you must be older than i thought
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    dang you must be older than i thought
    Yup. Older, smarter, and better looking than you knew... or can even conceive of <G>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  5. #40
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Lead in, no. Options?
    #5 came to me from Maternal Grandfather. #1? Not so good. The sheave on the right hand side is pure trouble unless rotation was limited to 100 RPM or less, much less. In your locale, fine yard art. Paul. if you want a versatile abrasive tool.
    https://www.kalamazooind.com/product...l-belt-sander/
    3M Scotch Brite belts for honing and polishing.
    https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-...3242352&rt=rud
    Tom

  6. #41
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    alright alright, aint about time for the nick sock?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    alright alright, aint about time for the nick sock?
    He's probably in bed.

    He's old, you know... <G>
    Last edited by David G; 09-20-2020 at 10:33 PM.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  8. #43
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    the appealing thing to me about that stone is the very large radius which would cut an extremely shallow arc into chisel and plane blades as compared to my slow speed wet tormek grinder; that grinder was a revelation to me and i much preferred the arc and precision that the 10" wheel provide over the 6" dry high speed delta i had been using

    i will admit to moving my stationary belt sander close to my lathe, always felt like that was cheating a bit

    it's getting on time to decide what to do with my shop, currently packed into a 10x20 storage in central michigan
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    the appealing thing to me about that stone is the very large radius which would cut an extremely shallow arc into chisel and plane blades as compared to my slow speed wet tormek grinder; that grinder was a revelation to me and i much preferred the arc and precision that the 10" wheel provide over the 6" dry high speed delta i had been using

    i will admit to moving my stationary belt sander close to my lathe, always felt like that was cheating a bit

    it's getting on time to decide what to do with my shop, currently packed into a 10x20 storage in central michigan
    Still nope. The 'lawn art' suggestion is a good one.... if you can get it for $50. You'd do better with that belt sander.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #45
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Woodward View Post
    No. That stone is ruined, it has a huge honking piece chipped out, at 10 o'clock.
    What, you've never redressed a wheel?

    But yeah, that grinder is for the third world where they make knives via the "stock removal" method, using scrap car and truck leaf springs to grind into cooking knives. I assume that along with a motor or treadle to drive it, a water bath tray is also missing, but that's the easiest part to fabricate, just bend up from duct sheet metal and solder the corners.

    But the best purpose for that here is to put out on the front yard with a sign that says, "Axe is sharp. Don't rob here. This IS your warning." Or maybe it's better with no sign, just the implied warning. Or one of those wood targets that they use for axe-throwing competitions. Well used.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    You could be right. After all, I've only been doing this since 1972. Maybe I haven't figured out what sharp really is...
    lots of woodworkers havent

  12. #47
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Conway View Post
    lots of woodworkers havent

    True
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  13. #48
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    farrier visited here yesterday, three more if those visits equals the price of a basic smithy fitted out
    After the guy that shoed my horse quit due to his doctors orders, he loaned me a book on horseshoeing which I photocopied. I then bought my own tools. My back would only allow me to do two feet in a day on my horse. I only worked on my own horse. A friend down the road asked me once about working on her horse, but her horse had a very weird shaped foot that I wasn't going to mess with.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    [QUOTE=L.W. Baxter;6279236]there was one like that on this farm when my folks bought it thirty years ago. foot powered. kind of cool, matched my dad's edge sharpening prowess/needs.

    On our farm too when I was a kid.
    I once thought I was wrong, but I was wrong, I wasn't wrong.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by L.W. Baxter View Post
    paul needs to get his hands on some old barn wood and rusted corrugated steel. build a 3-sided shack in the shade of a saguaro cactus. he'll need a stump, anvil, leg vise. then the foot-driven grinding horse will make sense.
    I have the stump, anvil, and leg vice, I need to get the wheel that I already have working when I get a

  16. #51
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Definitely should buy it! Put it in a corner of the living room and add a few painted saws, a folk-art embellished milk can and a scarecrow.
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  17. #52
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Two hunnert seems high.

    I found this one on the side of the road, someone was cleaning out a basement. I was afraid some other junk hound would grab it if I went for help, so I put it in the van myself. On the way back they had thrown out a motor and mount with a flat belt, so figuring it was my lucky day I grabbed that as well.

    The motor and mount was a cobbled together thing that left a lot to be desired, nevertheless I used it on a slick and axe to try it out. The wheel is maybe a quarter inch out of round, which would take some dressing even if there were some kind of guide. The lack of a guide of any kind limits the usefulness.

    The problem is that it's so slow cutting, too slow for any kind of stock removal, but it does grind nice and fine. Another drawback is that you get very wet, which is fine on a summer day, but a misery any other time of year, kinda like power washing.

    For someone who makes knives or something similar it would be well worth doing what had to be done to get it working, as it's unlike anything else out there.

    Jim



  18. #53
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    St. Paul, MN, USA
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    200 bucks, yes or no? No. Too big and quirky, too much money, too much hassle, too many better alternatives. That thing belongs in a living-history exhibit, not in your shop.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  19. #54
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by L.W. Baxter View Post
    good for lawn mower blades. oh wait
    I love you, man.
    The true patriotism, the only rational patriotism, is loyalty to the Nation ALL the time, loyalty to the Government when it deserves it.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    ^ (-:

    $200 for art - if it had the old foot drive. That pulley ruins it.



    Dad had one with the foot drive when I was a kid - worked (slowly) for axes & such.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Way too fast, 1750 rpm
    Fine for high speed steel lathe tools maybe, but will ruin high carbon steel in a second without coolant.
    I teach people tool sharpening, I set up a standard double ended bench grinder with a soft white 140 grit alox wheel, a 150mm long toolrest, no coolant and no tub of water in which to dunk the tool. The rule is, soft wheel for hard steel, light pressure only, and watch the spark pattern. The edges dont burn with that wheel, not unless there is too much pressure.
    But the biggest thing that makes a real difference, is the wheel dresser, without that the wheel loads up and very soon starts to heat the workpiece, the wheel has to be kept perfectly clean.
    The grinder is the first part of a three part sharpening system, its there only to put the primary bevel on, its the 800 grit Japanese waterstone which puts the micro bevel on, and the green paste on the leather strop that polishes the edge and takes the wire edge off. Shaving sharp, three minutes or less.

    I also show people the different colour and spark patterns for the different grades of steel, this so they can evaluate junk shop tools and know which are worth keeping.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Get one of these and don't look back


    Makita 9820 ( Amazon $375)

    Hateful things, life is just not long enough to use one of those.

    I have in my client base, woodshop teachers who have 40 plus hand planes, plus at least three times that number of chisels. Every couple of months I go in and sharpen the whole lot, I need to get through 15 planes an hour, and that includes grinding nicks out of the irons where the kids have hit the vice or a nail.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    I have one, it was a "found item" maybe 30 years ago.
    The stone is wider than those pictured here, about 4" wide x 20" dia and is centered and trued on the axle using a fixtured and cast in situ lead plug. That gets it close, then it can be finely trued using a piece of steel pipe held end on to the stone, and finished flat with the edge of a piece of glass (coolant required) This may take an hour or two. I made an oak block rest that is doweled/removable onto the wooden frame with 1/4" copper pins and is the correct angle for a slick, chisel, plane iron etc.
    The coolant bit is problematic, if you run the wheel through a bath it throws water everywhere, and the stone will become heavier on one side from sitting in the bath. (If you live where it freezes that half bath can fracture the stone) I used a suspended pail with a wee spigot soldered on that I can adjust "just right" to keep everything cool and wet without throwing it, fussy that.
    I originally set it up with a foot treadle but soon realized that was a fools errand and set up a 1/4 hp motor with a double reduction belt jack-shaft turning maybe 3-400 rpm. Perfect to rehab a flea market slick or framing chisel that was used as a concrete removal tool, or splitting wedge.
    The real moral of this story is it has been sitting all the way in the rear of the barn and has not been used or even moved in 25 years.
    I should throw it away.
    The 20" iron v-belt pulley I will keep for a while longer, there is collection of those hanging on the outside of the back wall on nails...

  24. #59
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    The 20" iron v-belt pulley I will keep for a while longer, there is collection of those hanging on the outside of the back wall on nails...
    what no pegboard?

  25. #60
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    16d duplex

  26. #61
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    Default

    For sharpening, I'd look at Lee Valley's little $99 belt sander. You will need to bring your own motor to the party. Runs cool, cuts fast.

    https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop...r?item=68Z7501



    Finish things off with a 1x42 leather belt charged with jeweler's rouge.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  27. #62
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    Default Re: 200 bucks, yes or no?

    We've got one at the Heriage Farm where I volunteer. Water can on top. The stone was originally a mill stone, you can tell looking at the sides. Hand cut.

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