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Thread: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

  1. #36
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    The Miq'maw council has set up a fishery administration council and conservation plan that mostly adheres to Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) guidelines, but it has no authority over non- community fishermen nor do they have any ability to enforce rules out on the water. DFO does not want the enforcement role as that would entangle them in treaty enforcement, which is the purview of the RCMP and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.
    That is almost exactly the situation around here. >90% of the Javaé people don't poach and are allies to conservation, but in their political system, they have no control over the <10% system abusers. Environmental authorities won't touch the issue with a 10-meter pole because indigenous affairs are fraught with politics and handled by a different agency.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Do the children of the jungle really have a better claim than those who can take it from them?



    Where is your outrage when those who extract for profit from your public lands even though you live with electricity, light, a comfortable bed and great stock market profits? The point is we earth eaters to take from others regardless of location or other peoples claim to land. Many here build homes in the wilderness, lovely forested areas or on the best farm land ruining the bounty and wondrous natural world that will never recover. Your hypocrisy is not lost on me.

  3. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    The local native community fishes and hunts whenever they want.
    Their position is essentially that they were here using resources for several thousand years before there was any problem with sustainability and whitey f&cked it up in the last 150 years.
    R


    On their own land? ( which, if like here. Is a separate nation) Or, anywhere in the province?

    Kevin


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  4. #39
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    How many Sipekne'katik First Nation lobster fishers are there and how many commercial craft?

    How many ocean fisheries have been ruined by all those "responsible" white fisherdudes arguing against restrictions and plundering away until the resource is nearly gone?

    Then they blame it all on the government.

    Here's a C & P on the collapse of the Newfoundland cod fishery. Hard to blame that on indigenous people, as they were all killed early on.


    20th century fishing methods and the fishery collapse

    In 1904 the British and French governments signed the Entente Cordiale which, among many other matters, extinguished French claims to Newfoundland in exchange for the Îles de Los off West Africa.

    In 1951 factory fishing began with new super-trawlers such as the 'Fairtry'; 280 feet long and 2,600 gross tons.[4]

    The cod catch peaked in 1968 at 810,000 tons, approximately three times more than the maximum yearly catch achieved before the super-trawlers. Approximately eight million tons of cod were caught between 1647 and 1750, a period encompassing 25 to 40 cod generations. The factory trawlers took the same amount in 15 years.[7]

    The industry collapsed entirely in the early 1990s owing to overfishing and debatably, greed, lack of foresight and poor local administration.[8] By 1993 six cod populations had collapsed, forcing a belated moratorium on fishing.[7] Spawning biomass had decreased by at least 75% in all stocks, by 90% in three of the six stocks, and by 99% in the case of 'northern' cod, previously the largest cod fishery in the world.[7]


    After a 10-year moratorium on fishing begun in 1992, the cod had still not returned.[9] It was thought that the local ecosystem might have changed, one possibility being that greater numbers of capelin, which used to provide food for the cod, might be eating the juvenile cod.[citation needed] The waters appeared to be dominated by crab and shrimp rather than fish.[9] However, by 2011 it became apparent that the fisheries were returning to their original abundance, just more slowly than had been anticipated.[10]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cod_fi...n_Newfoundland
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  5. #40
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    How many Sipekne'katik First Nation lobster fishers are there and how many commercial craft?

    How many ocean fisheries have been ruined by all those "responsible" white fisherdudes arguing against restrictions and plundering away until the resource is nearly gone?

    Then they blame it all on the government.
    How many white fisherdudes
    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    dumped off the side of a back road because the local Miq'maw had caught more than they could eat or sell.
    Greed and cupidity crosses racial boundaries.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  6. #41
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    On their own land? ( which, if like here. Is a separate nation) Or, anywhere in the province?

    Kevin


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    Hunting on their own land(mostly) and Crown land including some parks like Algonquin, being traditional territory.
    Fishing anywhere,also traditional territory.
    The Feds bought the local commercial quota and gave it to them.
    Almost all lakes and waterways are public property.
    R
    Last edited by Ron Williamson; 09-21-2020 at 06:43 PM.
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  7. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Hunting on their own land(mostly) and Crown land including some parks like Algonquin, being traditional territory.
    Fishing anywhere,also traditional territory.
    The Feds bought the local commercial quota and gave it to them.
    Almost all lakes and waterways are public property.
    R


    Thanks for your reply.

    This issue raises the question for me, if native lands are sovereign nations ( they are here), do they not have territorial seas, or water boundaries?

    Kevin


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  8. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    How many Sipekne'katik First Nation lobster fishers are there and how many commercial craft?

    How many ocean fisheries have been ruined by all those "responsible" white fisherdudes arguing against restrictions and plundering away until the resource is nearly gone?

    Then they blame it all on the government.

    Here's a C & P on the collapse of the Newfoundland cod fishery. Hard to blame that on indigenous people, as they were all killed early on.


    20th century fishing methods and the fishery collapse

    In 1904 the British and French governments signed the Entente Cordiale which, among many other matters, extinguished French claims to Newfoundland in exchange for the Îles de Los off West Africa.

    In 1951 factory fishing began with new super-trawlers such as the 'Fairtry'; 280 feet long and 2,600 gross tons.[4]

    The cod catch peaked in 1968 at 810,000 tons, approximately three times more than the maximum yearly catch achieved before the super-trawlers. Approximately eight million tons of cod were caught between 1647 and 1750, a period encompassing 25 to 40 cod generations. The factory trawlers took the same amount in 15 years.[7]

    The industry collapsed entirely in the early 1990s owing to overfishing and debatably, greed, lack of foresight and poor local administration.[8] By 1993 six cod populations had collapsed, forcing a belated moratorium on fishing.[7] Spawning biomass had decreased by at least 75% in all stocks, by 90% in three of the six stocks, and by 99% in the case of 'northern' cod, previously the largest cod fishery in the world.[7]


    After a 10-year moratorium on fishing begun in 1992, the cod had still not returned.[9] It was thought that the local ecosystem might have changed, one possibility being that greater numbers of capelin, which used to provide food for the cod, might be eating the juvenile cod.[citation needed] The waters appeared to be dominated by crab and shrimp rather than fish.[9] However, by 2011 it became apparent that the fisheries were returning to their original abundance, just more slowly than had been anticipated.[10]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cod_fi...n_Newfoundland


    One way to look at it.

    Another view is that millions of non-fishing white dudes and dudettes, many who live thousands of miles from where cod live, just keep demanding cod for dinner.

    Kevin


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  9. #44
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Thanks for your reply.

    This issue raises the question for me, if native lands are sovereign nations ( they are here), do they not have territorial seas, or water boundaries?

    Kevin


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    Yes.
    Here is a link to the local thing
    https://groups.google.com/g/misc.act...E_VmQweQ?pli=1
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Here's another
    https://www.saugeenojibwaynation.ca/...press-release/
    Lots of similar claims everywhere
    R
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  11. #46
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by George. View Post
    whitey decimated Africa's wildlife and oppressed and enslaved Africans for centuries. So now should we let Africa's "indigenous people" poach rhino horn and ivory to make up for it?
    Whose the 'WE'?

    A major U.N.-backed report says that nature on indigenous peoples’ lands is degrading less quickly than in other areas
    From May last year;
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...s-communities/

    A kaleidoscopic diversity of Earth’s plants and animals underpins human existence but is under major threat from the environmental degradation wrought by human activities from mining to agriculture. A million species face extinction—many within decades—without major changes to the way we interact with nature......But ....this decline is happening at a slower rate on indigenous peoples’ lands, ..... Its authors and other conservation experts say the world should not only draw lessons from those and other local communities’ environmental stewardship but that scientists and policy makers need to support and partner with them in order to stem the tide of biodiversity loss.
    On average, they are doing a better job of managing natural resources and environmental hazards like species decline and pollution,” says Pamela McElwee, one of the report’s lead authors and an associate professor of human ecology at Rutgers University. “This is a watershed moment in acknowledging that indigenous and local communities play really important roles in maintaining and managing biodiversity and landscapes that the rest of us can learn from.”
    Many indigenous and local communities actively manage their lands, such as through traditional burning practices that promote biodiversity in places including Australia. They also carry out ecological restoration of degraded lands, such as in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, where indigenous communities have been involved in restoring shellfish populations and native plant species.
    Indigenous peoples and local communities also play an important role in long-term monitoring of ecosystems. This is critical, especially because some of these groups live in remote, hard-to-reach areas, such as the Arctic or Amazon forest.

    Those First Nations peoples should allowed to use their traditional resources for their livelihood as they have always done. If doing that requires modern equipment - then that is what it requires.
    If they observe that they are over harvesting they are more likely to cease than any 'whitey'. Contemporary experience demonstrates it - an opinion backed up by scientific studies (above).

    At the heart of this argument is not "should or should not", its "who should and who should not".
    Either way, the lobsters are harvested, sold and the money is injected into the local economy. Exactly the same result, just not by a particular group of people....... (dare i mention privilege?)

    If there's a sustainable amount left for anyone else to harvest, then let them have it. If not, then tough titty.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by JayInOz View Post
    Indigenous populations being allowed to carry on their traditional practices has been a sore point in a lot of places- especially when the indigenous in question are protesting for equality in all things at the same time. Australias aborigines are allowed to hunt dugong because they have always hunted dugong. Except in the past they hunted from a bark canoe using a sharp stick. Now they arrive at the shore in a Toyota Landcruiser towing a fast runabout, and kill dugong with high powered rifles- the entire outfit supplied and paid for by the government. Some people don't like that arrangement, but one word of protest gets one labelled racist. Tricky situation. JayInOz
    There aren't many who are allowed to hunt Dugong.
    There's one group - I think its possibly Meriam people in Torres Straits (Mir Island, or as bearla, Murray island) who have stopped hunting because populations are so depleted - due to sea grass degredation caused by warming seas. Those same people hunt(ed) dugong because they revere fish and especially sharks, so much so that they can't hunt fish. Kinda puts you in a hard spot for protein (or just food) when your in the middle of the ocean.
    They are however allowed to trade for fish from one particular tribe, who are only a few hundred kilometers away. Incidentlay this other tribe are the only people who are allowed to land on Mir Island without permission - in strict law, even today, anyone else landing without permission is meant to have their head chopped off (Also, by the by, Mir Island is the home of the Chief of Chiefs. There are a few tribes in eastern Torres Straits, each with their own chief. The Meriam chief is the chief of those chiefs.)
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Some places in the U.S. are designated as ceded land under treaty. This is the case in Northern Wisconsin and certain tribal members are allowed to hunt and fish anywhere they please including your property if it is within the borders of the ceded territory. There were massive protests at one time over spear fishing. Thankfully cooler heads have gotten together and set reasonable limits for both sides.

    Jim...

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    On their own land? ( which, if like here. Is a separate nation) Or, anywhere in the province?

    Kevin


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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Apparently, my indigenous roots go back mostly to Western Steppe Herders, and the Bell Beaker culture. Accordingly, I'm gonna make some globular pottery, and decorate it by pressing cords into it while the clay's still damp. Use it to brew some mead or ale, and then wash down a chunk of roasted proto-sheep and some turnips, while fingering my fancy copper bladed dagger or pole-hafted axe.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by TomF View Post
    Apparently, my indigenous roots go back mostly to Western Steppe Herders, and the Bell Beaker culture. Accordingly, I'm gonna make some globular pottery, and decorate it by pressing cords into it while the clay's still damp. Use it to brew some mead or ale, and then wash down a chunk of roasted proto-sheep and some turnips, while fingering my fancy copper bladed dagger or pole-hafted axe.


    just post some pics

  16. #51
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    I've never ceded my sovereignty, btw. There's got to be a patch of dirt somewhere between western Ireland and eastern Poland where I can stake my claim.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

  17. #52
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    My indigenous roots go back to Basque whalers. Perhaps I should claim my ancestral right to kill a northern right whale with an explosive harpoon.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    George, your ancestors did not hunt whales with explosive harpoons. That was an American invention.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    George might have been being ironic. I wonder how the Miq'maw used to catch lobsters before there were European immigrants to copy?

    I have only found one reference for the indigenous, pre European fishery.
    Hilton McCully wrote in his 1995 book, Pictou Island, “in the harbour of Cibou (Sydney, Cape Breton) in 1597, one haul of a little dragnet brought up 140 lobsters.” It is quite amazing to think that in just 400 years the lobster population has declined so greatly that if you were to throw a net out now you would be lucky to get any at all! Long ago, before traps were used, lobsters were fished from the shallow waters by spearing or gaffing. Fishermen hunted for lobsters by torch light on calm evenings, spearing them as they crawled around in search of food. During the day they would spread a slick of oil over the surface of the water darkening the water below, and then throw out cod heads for bait. The lobsters would swarm around the bait and the fishermen would spear them. Although there was no real commercial market for lobster at this time, some fishermen did sell their catch to make money. Because the lobsters were worth more if there were no spear marks in them, the fishermen began using wire cages to trap the animals so they could get a better price. These wire cages were adapted from the Europeans who used them to catch crayfish and Spiny lobsters. There was such an abundance of lobster long ago that it was not a valued commodity and was considered a poor man’s food. It wasn’t until the second half of the 19th Century that the lobster industry began to flourish.
    http://www.parl.ns.ca/lobster/history.htm
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  20. #55
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Actually the European immigrants learned how to harvest lobsters by drags, traps, and spears from those already living there, rather like they learned about corn, local game, and local sea foods.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    I feel I must reiterate that the issue in play at the moment in St. Mary's Bay is not the right of the Miq'maw to harvest lobsters (which the SW Nova Lobster Fishers Assoc. supports), nor the methods which they use. The issue is that the commercial fishermen believe that the Miq'maw should be required to follow the same scientifically-defined fishing seasons and zones and gear restrictions that the commercial fishers have to, which includes not starting to fish a month earlier than the commercial fleet and not fishing on protected spawning grounds. There is some pretty bold sophistry being employed by the native spokespeople when talking to the press, designed solely to mislead the general public and sway their opinion in favour of the native fishers, to whit:

    The local band chief has said that the Miq'maw start fishing earlier than the proscribed season because in their small, non-mechanized twenty-four-foot boats they cannot compete with the big fifty-foot boats with fancy hydraulic systems that the commercial fishers use. Bullspit. The local band has six fifty-foot boats and licenses for 350 traps per boat that were given to them by the federal government.

    Native spokespersons repeatedly reference the Treaty of 1758 which guarantees their right to make a living from fishing and hunting (although this is the first such treaty, in actuality they mean the Treaty of 1760-61, which includes "...the right to harvest fish, wildlife, wild fruit and berries to support a moderate livelihood ..."). The wild card in this hand is that "a moderate living" has never been defined. The local commercial fishermen insist that it means a moderate living for the crew of each boat; the local Miq'maw chief interprets it as their fleet of boats are free to harvest as much lobsters as they can to provide a moderate living for the entire band population, and if this means fishing out-of-season, soft-shelled and egg-bearing {'berried') females in commercially-prohibited areas, with more than the legal allotment of traps, so be it.

    The local situation has gotten out of hand because the governmental authorities whom can enforce the laws governing the commercial fishery are loathe to attempt to do so with the native fishery because it will trigger a federal court case to define the boundaries - if any - of the native fishery within the commercial fishery boundaries, and such a court challenge will quickly become much bigger and more complicated than merely a local fishery and a local native band, so all the gov't agencies are playing 'hot potato' with the issue. This lack of clarity engenders disputes on the waterfront between the local Miq'maw who believe that they can make their own rules despite the established scientific data and conservation methods, and the regional commercial fishermen's council, which participates in and abides by the conservation plan for the regional fishery and want to preserve the resource by having everyone playing on a level field.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    And of course, the legal ramifications have much more breadth than simply the lobster fishery. Which happens to be fairly plentiful at the moment in Canadian waters ... in part because the cod who used to eat immature lobsters wafting about in the water column aren't there anymore.

    Do squid and jellyfish eat immature lobsters like the cod?
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Whales are not fairly plentiful, but there is no shortage of "natives" claiming the ancestral right to continue killing them, including endangered species.

    Pretty soon we will all be reduced to jellyfish, and then no one will be able to claim ancestral rights.

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    That's the part which depresses me more, George.

    When I think about the First Nations people whose cultures were so entwined with the natural world ... what they were entwined with was the plenty in the landscape. The unimaginable numbers of bison and caribou. The reputed flocks of birds numbering in the millions. The oceans so teeming with fish, on either North American coast, that they could be easily harvested with buckets or spears. Or one's hands.

    It wasn't European ethnicity that stomped all that down into dry bones, but it surely was European technology and ambition.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    My favourite post-apocalyptic, post-ecological-disaster pessimistic funny line was in a cartoon of a waiter taking an order from a seated diner:

    "...and what type of algae would m'sieur prefer today?"
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    How many generations in a place to count as "Indigenous"?

    How many generations away from the place to stop being "Indigenous"?
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

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    That's what I wonder, my good Welshman.

    Here in Canada we have various legal definitions for folks wishing to access these or those rights, but in contrast "indigenous" has come to mean that you have some quantity of DNA specific to people who lived somewhere in this hemisphere prior to European contact and colonization. The is interpreted differently on other continents, eh?

    "Indigenous" in North America, is what Eric Hobsbawm described in his book Nations and Nationalism as an "imagined community." Not a pejorative term - Hobsbawm observed that every community is "imagined" - people imagine a connection into a group, and the group in turn can imagine that the person as a member. Our membership in such groups overlaps - I can be Canadian, New Brunswicker, Commonwealth member, son, employee, father... And in that context, "indigenous" here in North America means that a person identifies him/herself as indigenous, and other folks who identify themselves as indigenous agree.

    In practice, most other hyphenated-nationalities among Canadians seem to dissipate after about 2 generations. At which point people aren't Irish-Canadian or Polish-Canadian, but just Canadian.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    So, how many of those evil, wasteful, profiteering indigenous lobster guys own this sort of boat?

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    So, how many of those evil, wasteful, profiteering indigenous lobster guys own this sort of boat?


    What is your point, Chip-skiff? What do you really want to say?
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by TomF View Post
    That's what I wonder, my good Welshman.

    Here in Canada we have various legal definitions for folks wishing to access these or those rights, but in contrast "indigenous" has come to mean that you have some quantity of DNA specific to people who lived somewhere in this hemisphere prior to European contact and colonization. The is interpreted differently on other continents, eh?

    "Indigenous" in North America, is what Eric Hobsbawm described in his book Nations and Nationalism as an "imagined community." Not a pejorative term - Hobsbawm observed that every community is "imagined" - people imagine a connection into a group, and the group in turn can imagine that the person as a member. Our membership in such groups overlaps - I can be Canadian, New Brunswicker, Commonwealth member, son, employee, father... And in that context, "indigenous" here in North America means that a person identifies him/herself as indigenous, and other folks who identify themselves as indigenous agree.

    In practice, most other hyphenated-nationalities among Canadians seem to dissipate after about 2 generations. At which point people aren't Irish-Canadian or Polish-Canadian, but just Canadian.
    A set of rules which poses real problems for Americans, Poles and Russians trying to drive the indigenous people from Jerusalem.....
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Pacific Northwest...Makah Tribe wants to resume whaling...a whale of a problem?
    https://www.ptleader.com/stories/mak...g-rights,68044

    A spring time 2019 preliminary recommendation by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration suggested allowing three whale kills in even-year hunts and one in odd-year hunts beginning in 2020 over a 10-year period.
    The last legal whale hunt in the U.S. took place in Neah Bay in 1999 after tribal members lobbied for the removal of the gray whale from the federally protected list of endangered species and was granted the right to hunt again.
    We lived in Port Townsend for 5 years, and I remember seeing a picture of Makah tribe members going out in a aluminum boat with high powered rifles...this is all news to me...

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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    What is your point, Chip-skiff? What do you really want to say?
    If there's no money in lobsters, why are you white boys soiling your pants about tribal fishing rights?

    It's not as if this sort of attack hasn't taken place elsewhere.

    Was it you who posted the crap about the poor state of the cod fishery being the fault of seals?
    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! —Cole Porter

  33. #68
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    If there's no money in lobsters, why are you white boys soiling your pants about tribal fishing rights?

    It's not as if this sort of attack hasn't taken place elsewhere.

    Was it you who posted the crap about the poor state of the cod fishery being the fault of seals?
    I suspect MMD has significantly more insight into the nuances of this particular case than you.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    If there's no money in lobsters, why are you white boys soiling your pants about tribal fishing rights?

    It's not as if this sort of attack hasn't taken place elsewhere.

    Was it you who posted the crap about the poor state of the cod fishery being the fault of seals?
    Do some research into the topic of irony, especially in titling threads.

    The fishing industry, by its nature, allows more opportunity for the unscrupulous to rape the resource. In this case the authorities know who is screwing up the future of the fishery, but the Law of Unintended Consequences is making it hard for the responsible authorities to bring it back under control.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: "Indigenous" vs. other humans

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    If there's no money in lobsters, why are you white boys soiling your pants about tribal fishing rights?

    It's not as if this sort of attack hasn't taken place elsewhere.

    Was it you who posted the crap about the poor state of the cod fishery being the fault of seals?
    "Us white boys" want the resource protected so that it remains productive and lucrative for everybody for generations to come, Chip. The current dispute in St. Mary's Bay is not about native fishing rights, it is about illegally fishing lobsters out-of-season in protected nursery grounds by a few indigenous peoples or their hired accomplices.

    I have posted about the poor state of the cod fishery and about how the harp seal is both the primary predator of cod and the primary host for fish worm which is rampant in the eastern cod stocks, and that with the demise of the seal hunt and decimation of the shark population on the east coast that seal population has exploded, bringing the problems of seal predation on the slowly-recovering cod stocks and the infection of those stocks with fish worm to an all-time high. But I understand that a fellow from the mountains of Wyoming is likely to misunderstand the subtleties of a maritime fishery situation.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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