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Thread: Casting Images

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    135

    Default Casting Images

    So I thought I post some pictures of my adventures in casting mostly parts for my boat.<br>Several years ago I took a course on backyard casting from the Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle. I do recommend it. However I just dabble, Its a lot like boat building, You can spend a lifetime doing it and still have more to learn.
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    This is the furnace I built, its over built (3" walls, should be closer to 2") Takes a while to get up to temperature.
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    Crucible and pouring shank

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    135

    Default Re: Casting Images

    I don't know why but the forum just won't upload a picture of my lifting tongs. I do need to combine those two tools into one like Jim's.
    the step where I put the crucible into the pouring shank scares the hell out of me. its hard to explain but the shank is sitting on the ground with the handle propped up on some bricks like shown but I have a fire brick that sits in the ring, I then place the crucible on top of it with the lifting tongs then put the tongs down pick up the shank's handle and secure the crucible in it. I spend the whole time watching my feet. if I can eliminate this step by not changing tools I will be safer.
    This was my first real project, wheels for the furnace. Learned a lot.
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    I must still have 20 of these laying around with different failures. The first thing I learned was to cast the hole. The mold was made from a water pump pulley off a '56 flat head Ford.
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    and shots of the final mold set up.
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    044.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    135

    Default Re: Casting Images

    This is one of my first attempts at a tiller to rudder yoke in bronze.
    DSCN0034.jpg
    I don't seem to have pictures of all the failures and modifications, but what I said before about casting the hole, I hadn't really learned yet. But in the end I got usable parts.
    DSCN0074.jpg
    The mold.
    DSCN0082.jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    9,125

    Default Re: Casting Images

    Watching with interest here, John. You seem to be getting some good results with some difficult pieces.

    I usually make a heap of dry sand on the ground to set the crucible in while I switch to the lifting tongs. For smaller parts I use a combined lifting tong/pouring shank with a smaller crucible. It's much faster to use and safer because there's less motions to go through while the crucible is out of the furnace.

    jim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    135

    Default Re: Casting Images

    Jim
    That does sound like it might help. I know its only 5 to 10 seconds but a lot could go wrong. The need for proper foot protection has been drummed into my head but when I am out there with my boots on and not enough ground space I feel very clumsy so I tend to just watch my feet. I mostly use a #10 crucible and think its a good solution. Have also seen furnaces that open from the side to eliminate that step but that's out of my scale.
    I don't have a lot of pictures and still going through them. Hopefully I can find enough to show a few more projects.
    What I need to start getting better at is developing my own patterns, a complete art in itself.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Providence,RI USA
    Posts
    178

    Default Re: Casting Images

    Those look nice! And they do look like somewhat challenging pieces.

    Making patterns is super-fun. Can be quick and easily adjusted/re-made. Some poplar, bondo, shellac, and you're ready to go!

    Good luck, and thanks for sharing your set-up.

    Mike

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