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Thread: OVerhang envy

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    3,416

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    Here's an interesting example of overhang. The Lechner A390, a one design within the D2 development class, was the Olympic windsurfer for a while, and although these U-bottomed 13 footers are far from the normal concept of a windsurfer, their outstanding light/medium air pace means that they are still a very efficient way to slide through the water. Although vertical stems that increased the waterline length were tried many times, designers like Georg Lechner went to a more rockered shape with a spoon bow and lots of overhang. So overhangs aren't always just rule beating measures.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #37
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    Jun 2013
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    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    Quote Originally Posted by Art Haberland View Post
    not surprised, these are lean times. Small boats rule when times are lean, does it get any smaller than a windsurfer?
    That's part of the appeal, but the class was the top-selling one before the Covid recession hit. The whole point was that major players in the windsurfing industry realised that the sport had become too fixated on high-wind high-tech high-performance. Hopefully some of the rest of the sport will make a similar move back to simpler sailing during the recession.

    Down here in OZ the small yacht scene looked very sick a couple of years ago, but now there seems to be green roots. The collapse in interest in small yachts, plus a crackdown on leaving them to rot on moorings, seems to have caused their value to drop so much that people who wouldn't have thought they could afford a yacht are now getting into them. It's a hopeful sign.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Westford MA & Milfjörd NH, USA
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    90

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    It appears that the boat photo of the OP is the ex-Hansina, 30 US44, originally the Anne Marie, a boat built to the 30 sq meter rule (i.e. a skerry cruiser, or scharenkreuzer) and the boat that George Fisher lovingly restored. It is now renamed Inca with a new owner. George had chronicled the boat history from Sweden, to Buckminster Fuller's ownership in Maine in the 1950s, and forward. George grew up and learned to sail on his father's 30 sq m boat Lil, the ex-Northern Light II, S13 and later known as 30 US27. George was so taken by the lines of the 30s, much like LFH had been 30+ years earlier, that he had a lifelong passion and pursuit of all-things-30. George wrote (by mail!) to everyone in the 30 community starting in the 1960s as a high school student, and gathered info along the way. He was still digging past 2010 when Us44 was finished. Meanwhile I started digging into the 30s only a few years ago, and attempted to reach George but was unable to do so -- not realizing he was very ill. I wrote to his family and got the story. That led to me having George's 30 sq m archive in four heavy boxes, because his wife Hansine 'didn't know what to do with them'. She said "He would have liked to talk to you" when I told her that I was tracing the 30 sq m boats in the US, a least two that my dad and grandfather raced in. My goal is to turn that archive, and letters, into something more because the square meter story in the US is a patchwork and it demands some stitching. FYI, HTH.

  4. #39
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    Jul 2020
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    Norwich, Norfolk, UK
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    933

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    I hope you are able to write a book or at least substantial article from the research on these beautiful boats..

    I looked into long overhangs when I designed my boat, but they just didn't work in our confined waters..
    Just an amateur bodging away..

  5. #40
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    Sep 2010
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    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    I saw the boat moored in Port Madison over the summer, rigged and looking ready to sail.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  6. #41
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    Oct 2005
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    seattle
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    20,722

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    I was anchored in Port Madison (the home of many pointy boats including many Sixes) a few years ago when Hansina came ghosting by. I asked the sailor (I assume George) if it was a 30 Square and he seemed quite surprised that I guessed right, probably because I was sitting in a powerboat. She was on a mooring buoy for a few years and I think I have several pictures of her somewhere. A very striking boat.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Westford MA & Milfjörd NH, USA
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    90

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    wites, quoting Calahan:
    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan
    Interesting timing this quote in this thread. H.A. Calahan became the owner of 30 US21 Ingrid circa late 1940s; it appeared in the 1952 Lloyd's Register of American Yachts as Kilroy. It was originally G66 Pasch in Germany, a G. Estlander design built at the Hacht shipyard.

    Replying to The Q, the article / book idea is what I had in mind.

  8. #43
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    Sep 2010
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    Bainbridge Island WA
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    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    On the subject of pointy boats on Bainbridge:

    Apparently there is some interest in getting an International 110 racing program going. Plans available through our hosts...
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  9. #44
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    Oct 2005
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    seattle
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    20,722

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    A little I-110 anecdote. In 1974, a friend and I bought a Blanchard Sr. Knockabout from a guy on Lake Union. It was a pretty nice boat and I ask him why he was selling it. He said because he bought a faster boat, and he showed us a bright yellow International 110. I said I was skeptical that it was faster than the Blanchard, so we agreed to race. We picked out some buoys around Lake Union and agreed to do an honor start at 7:00pm on Tuesday night. We did and we had so much fun I decided to print up some course maps for the next Tuesday night at 7:00pm, and titled it the Lake Union Duck Dodge. We hung these around the lake and the next Tuesday we had about 30 boats show up, and the rest is history. The Duck Dodge is still raced on Tuesdays now 47 years later.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    PNW, an island west of Seattle
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    2,978

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post

    How does the backstay work on this boat? The fitting at the mast head would have to be very stiff... or what???

    Jeff

  11. #46
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: OVerhang envy

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    How does the backstay work on this boat? The fitting at the mast head would have to be very stiff... or what???

    Jeff
    If its anything like the ones you get on other fractional rigged boats then its basically a flexible batten that holds the backstay clear of the main when loosened so you can tack or gybe without snagging the main:

    tms-backstay-flicker.jpg

    As you put more tension on the backstay on then the batten bends until eventually you have a straight run from the masthead to the chainplate.

    I'm assuming that this is what this I 110 has, and they didn't have a lot of tension on the backstay when the photo was taken.

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