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Thread: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

  1. #1
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    Default 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Hi. I'm wondering if the 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler is a good boat, can it do larger crossings? Can you singelhand it. Any opinion is welcome. Dave


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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Hadn't thought Culler was that old... Need more info.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    - Chris

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    I can’t answer the question re passage making Dave, but it “looks" like a nice seaworthy hull shape. Have you got a copy of the plans - or access to them - and if so, do they include any stability calculations? How is she intended to be ballasted?

    I’d venture to suggest that any boat well founded can be set up for passage making but a more difficult thing to assess is her sea kindliness - ie how comfortable she is in a heavy sea - and you really need to talk to other owners to get an idea of that.

    What attracted you to the design?

    As for single handing, again I’d venture to suggest that you could set up any boat for comfortable single handing and a boat of the 1840 Cutter size should be an ideal size for a single hander.
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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    I looked at the study plans online. She looks sound, not really fast but comfortable. I wonder if at 35 foot she might be a bit heavy for single handing.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    I find my 39' cruising ketch a good single hand boat. She is a steady platform due to her weight, and setting the mizzen weathercocks her, letting me set the other sails at a relaxed pace. Her gear is heavy though, and sheeting in the main takes strength. Someday I may add a winch there.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    I can’t answer the question re passage making Dave, but it “looks" like a nice seaworthy hull shape. Have you got a copy of the plans - or access to them - and if so, do they include any stability calculations? How is she intended to be ballasted?

    I’d venture to suggest that any boat well founded can be set up for passage making but a more difficult thing to assess is her sea kindliness - ie how comfortable she is in a heavy sea - and you really need to talk to other owners to get an idea of that.

    What attracted you to the design?

    As for single handing, again I’d venture to suggest that you could set up any boat for comfortable single handing and a boat of the 1840 Cutter size should be an ideal size for a single hander.

    shee is quite heavy and the ballast is on the inside.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Based on what builder's expect today from plans Culler's plans for the "1840 British Cutter" might be best considered as a preliminary design. Anyone contemplating building based on those plans might want to invest in a knowledgable naval architect/boat designer doing some hydrostatic calculations, a weight and CG location estimate, and a preliminary stability analysis. Culler was better known for the look and character of his designs than being technically thorough.
    Last edited by David Cockey; 08-31-2020 at 03:15 PM.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Isn’t Silva Bans a Culler repro boat?

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    The ill fated schooner John F. Leavitt was a Culler design.
    As much as I like Culler's small craft, I would not consider building without the blessings of a naval architect.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Pete never styled himself as a NA. His larger designs were pretty much based on traditional designs and should be checked by a NA
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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Do you want a ten year build project or do you want to go sailing?If its the latter,you can find faster and equally seaworthy boats by the thousand for a lot less money than it would take to build one to the Culler design.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    is it bad that all of the balast is on the inside?

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Inside ballast gives a slower righting moment and a more comfortable motion, generally.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Quote Originally Posted by dave2700 View Post
    is it bad that all of the balast is on the inside?
    Working sailing craft were built that way until engines replaced sail between the wars.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    I believe Leavitt was lost cuz the skipper was on the wrong boat.
    heaving to in a gulf stream gale....moron.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I believe Leavitt was lost cuz the skipper was on the wrong boat.
    heaving to in a gulf stream gale....moron.
    That's for sure, but the video footage of the abandonment and the vessel adrift did not inspire confidence in the design. You had to see the CG footage, I think that Culler was clearly over his head with that one. A lot of caricature in that vessel with not so much calculation was my impression.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    If I know the minimum ballast can i re design the Construction plans to have the minimum ballast on the outside?

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Quote Originally Posted by dave2700 View Post
    If I know the minimum ballast can i re design the Construction plans to have the minimum ballast on the outside?
    The distribution might be important, along with the increased moments requiring different framing, floors etc.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Quote Originally Posted by dave2700 View Post
    If I know the minimum ballast can i re design the Construction plans to have the minimum ballast on the outside?
    You would need to change the lines. There is not enough keel down there to take outside ballast.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    I have never been too comfortable with some of Pete Culler's designs as often some are a bit unstable and need a good amount of inside ballast. I remember when one capsized upon launching! Rather like the "Vassa" in that respect! They may look good but one must have a great amount of inner instinct and common sense to make some of his designs work well! L. Francis Herreshoff produced a lot very nice and seaworthy designs in his book, "Sensible Cruising Designs".
    https://www.amazon.com/Sensible-Crui...cis-Herreshoff
    Jay

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    Default Re: 1840 british cutter by Pete Culler

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I have never been too comfortable with some of Pete Culler's designs as often some are a bit unstable and need a good amount of inside ballast. I remember when one capsized upon launching! Rather like the "Vassa" in that respect! They may look good but one must have a great amount of inner instinct and common sense to make some of his designs work well! L. Francis Herreshoff produced a lot very nice and seaworthy designs in his book, "Sensible Cruising Designs".
    https://www.amazon.com/Sensible-Crui...cis-Herreshoff
    Jay
    Well, she has bags of freeboard, so the design could stand being set deeper in the water, which would give both form stability and a lower KG. She would be slower of course, but could be made to work.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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