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Thread: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

  1. #36
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Before removing the damaged strakes I transferred the line of each lap to the transom edge.I checked the symmetry each side of the keel to make sure it looked ok.

    I then cut the strakes back staggering the joints which will be scarfed.Now at this point I will raise the question of the close proximity of the scarfed joints.If the dinghy had been constructed of solid timber with riveted and roved laps I would not have attempted to do this.It is however ply with battened seams and with scarfed joints will be a very stiff part of the hull when complete.The stern sheet framing will also follow this line of joints.All will be revealed later in the thread.
    Attachment 66288Attachment 66289Attachment 66293

    The lands pictured were later trimmed further as each strake was fitted to create a fair curve and run.

    I then proceeded to form the 8:1 scarf joints.Using the plane and following the lines of the lamination in the ply was straight forward to create the taper on the bench.
    In the dinghy it was a different story as I had to form the taper under each lap.This I did with a multi tool,then finished with a broad chisel.I placed a block under the work to support the edge as I went.
    The 4mm ply sitting on the hull was a piece that I managed to score off a friend just an hour before covid lockdown here in NZ.There was just enough to complete the job while we were in isolation.
    The Scandinavians, who invented clinker building were not too bothered about scarfs being close together. With well-cut scarfs, and good glue you have nothing to worry about.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #37
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Fitting of the strakes started closest to the keel.
    One strake was fitted each side per day to allow for decent clamping of the scarf and overnight curing of the thickened epoxy.
    Small screws were used along the laps to hold, then removed the next day.
    IMG-1837.jpgIMG-1840.jpgIMG-1843.jpgIMG-1914.jpg

    The final fit of each strake was made by paring the landing until the run of each strake looked fair.
    The edge of the previous strake was beveled to receive the lap of the following piece.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-20-2020 at 04:57 AM.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Thank you for the tutorial. I have a 60-ish year old plywood lapstrake runabout (hiding under a tarp until I have time to get around to it) with similar soft spots.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  4. #39
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    My pleasure Steve.Glad to be of some help.
    I totally agree with that quote from H.A. Calahan by the way.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    As you can see in the bottom image of the last post I have rigged up a block and tackle arrangement which allows me to rotate the dinghy.
    This enables me to position the hull at a comfortable working angle to the great relief of my rotator cuff tendons.
    IMG-2033.jpg

    The inside of the hull was completely scraped/sanded and epoxy sealed.
    The epoxy sealer I used is made here in NZ and is a thinner less viscous liquid with anti fungal additives to deal with any potential rot problems.
    Then every lap was strengthened with an epoxy fillet.The fillet recipe consisted of 1 part 404,2 parts 406 and 2 parts 407 by volume of West System fillers.
    IMG-2034.jpgIMG-2038.jpgIMG-2040.jpgIMG-2041.jpg
    I ended up increasing the fillet width around the transom perimeter for peace of mind.
    Most of this will be hidden by the stern sheets as will be revealed in future posts.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Now we come to the sternsheets or in layman's terms,the back seat.
    Another piece of coreflute was cut out and placed in the stern to get an idea of the look.
    IMG-2058.jpgIMG-2061.jpg

    After a few minor tweaks I drew a more accurate shape onto a solid panel.Along this line I placed the stations that the laminations (Kauri, 6 of 90x3mm) would lay against.
    This lamination would form the frame for the front bulkhead of the seat as I also plan to have watertight compartments.
    Not only would it be this shape in plan but it would also replicate the same crown/camber as the deck,hence the 90mm (3-1/2") width of the stock to allow for the curve.
    IMG-2066.jpgIMG-2067 (1).jpgIMG-2068 (1).jpg

  7. #42
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Now this is where the post heads off in a totally different direction for a moment and that is...toward the bow.
    I had replaced the transom and it seemed now that the aft end was looking nice the bow would need to come up to standard.
    I was constantly thinking about how I would do it, so much so it was distracting me from the sternsheet construction.So I just got on with the job of replacing the stem.
    This is what the original stem looked like.Laminated Kahikatea (white pine) and what seemed to be lots of polyester resin.
    So with a trusty reciprocating saw and planer off it came.

    I then laminated a couple of strips of wood around the profile of the stem.A piece of mdf was hot glued to this on which to draw the new stem profile.
    IMG-1838 (1).jpgIMG-1917.jpgIMG-1918.jpg

    The idea of a reversed raked stem appealed after seeing an image of the catboat "Molly B"designed by C.C.Hanley.
    I would just like to point out at this stage that I design and draw pretty much on the fly to a stage where I just like the look.I enjoy the process and results,
    hence the "believed abstraction" heading for this thread.
    So after drawing and erasing a few lines I came up with something that appealed and allowed a little leeway for altering the shape if needed.

    IMG-1920.jpgIMG-1928.jpg
    Made two patterns,selected the Kauri,cut the shapes and then joined them together complete with a spline.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Looks fantastic Mike. That's a lucky little boat to have found you.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Looks fantastic Mike. That's a lucky little boat to have found you.
    Cheers John.
    I've been a WoodenBoat forum lurker for a while now.
    Feeling I now had something to contribute thought this project would be good to share,especially now the CYANZ forum has died.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I have a 12 ft clinker too. Its a Cox design. It's pig ugly and was built with no regards to standards.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Is that the dinghy affectionately known as the "Black Pig"?The Captain Pugwash influence.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-19-2020 at 07:22 PM.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Next task was to create a tight join to the apron.
    The usual planing,sanding,placing it on, taking it off again scenario.
    It was also easier to fair the ends of the strakes with the stem was off to create a nice bearding line.
    IMG-1931.jpgIMG-1922.jpgIMG-1956.jpg
    The stem was tapered slightly toward the cutwater to follow the line of the hood ends.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Is that the dinghy affectionately known as the "Black Pig"?The Captain Pugwash influence.
    Naw, the black pig is the old glass dinghy that came with Waione, I treated it bad for 37 years and its still alive, earning it grudging respect.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A jig was made to guide a router with a broad cove box bit.This created the scallop running parallel to inner line of the stem.
    Unfortunately I do not have any photos of this operation but I can tell you there was no room for error.
    IMG-1974.jpgIMG-1975.jpg
    The taper to the leading edge of the stem was finished to a 15mm (about 9/16") thickness which runs full length of the scallop.
    This was shaped with a broad chisel,small block plane,Dremel and sandpaper.
    I plan to place a 1/2" brass rubbing strap along this leading edge.
    IMG-1969.jpgIMG-1967.jpgIMG-1968.jpg
    I applied a couple of epoxy sealer coats which brought out the colour.
    The decision to keep it bright finished to the waterline (just above the joint) or to the line of the keel is yet to be made.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-20-2020 at 05:06 AM.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Great craftsmanship, Mike! What's your jointer/table saw combination machine?
    "George Washington as a boy
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  16. #51
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by UCanoe_2 View Post
    Great craftsmanship, Mike! What's your jointer/table saw combination machine?
    Thank you for the compliment.
    My table saw is just your run of the mill Macma with a 10' blade powered by a 2 hp motor.
    It has handled everything I have thrown through it so far..as long as the teeth are sharp and it is the correct blade for the job.
    I have made a slide for it which comes in handy.
    Any large panel work I use a Festool saw on a guide,which is kind of like a portable table saw and very accurate if used correctly.
    IMG_2298[1].jpgIMG_2299[1].jpg

    I do not know the brand of the jointer, it is one of the generic types.
    The state of it was rather poor when I bought it and was reflected in the price but I saw potential.
    The feed bed was re machined as was the fence.I pulled it completely apart down to the last bolt and screw.Every part was inspected and cleaned and repainted where necessary and reassembled.
    Three new blades were inserted,everything was adjusted and it works great.It is powered by a 2 hp motor also.
    IMG_2306[1].jpg
    All my machines are attached with dust extractors,although looking round the workshop today it may be time for a spring clean.

    My other go to machine is this portable Makita thicknesser.I have had this for years and it is still going strong.
    I made an attachment out of 4"stormwater pipe that the hose from the dust extractor slides into,saves a lot of sweeping up.
    It is mounted on a stand with castors for storing when not in use.
    IMG_2308[1].jpg
    One other tool that comes in handy especially for the curved work is the bobbin sander.Even better if it can oscillate.It was on my wish list.
    I had been given a small drill press that had a broken spring and one day an idea just popped into my head.
    Why not invert the drill press and mount it under a strong,stiff working surface to make a bobbin sander.
    With a treadle type arrangement that would operate the up and down of the chuck and drum.
    IMG_2310[1].jpg
    It has various collars with different diameter holes that mount flush around the matching drum.A vacuum is connected underneath.Speed can be adjusted according to the grit and timber used.
    The drum has around 1 1/2" of travel depending on how far you depress the treadle.Works great.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-20-2020 at 05:08 AM.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Manually operated inverted drill press bobbin sander.Photo did not fit in the previous post.
    IMG_2309[1].jpg

  18. #53
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Well after digressing a little,it's back to the stem.
    IMG-1971.jpgIMG-1999.jpgIMG-2019.jpgIMG-2015.jpgIMG-2029.jpg

    These images show the stem from a few different perspectives to give an idea of the proportion.
    Before permanently fixing, the strakes at the bow were faired as some of the lap edges had been damaged.I wanted to create a nice even shadow line on each lap.
    I will continue to do this when fairing the rest of the outside of the hull.
    100mm (4") bugle headed SS screws were used to fix the stem from the inside through the apron,with a good dose of thickened epoxy.
    I did this to avoid drilling holes through the tapered section of the stem as the bugle heads of the screws have quite a large diameter.
    The head of the stem will be trimmed once I figure out what gammon iron configuration I will use.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Now..back to the quarters abaft the beam.
    So the laminated piece for the top of the sternsheet bulkhead frame went
    from this,IMG-2067 (1).jpgto this,IMG-2069.jpg.

    The last image highlights the crown that will resemble the deck camber.
    The tricky part was as the shape of the frame moved aft to the bottom of the U,the deck crown had to be calculated for the diminishing beam measurement.
    I did this at four different points, then transfered the measurements up from the base onto the workpiece.A flexible batten was then used to connect the dots and create the curve.
    The lower offcut was also used for the bottom frame of the bulkhead.
    IMG-2076 (1).jpg
    The above image shows the beam shelf in place and the curved frame positioned.
    The batten athwart the block is determining the measurement and attachment point for the sawn beam that will lay there.
    All the timbers will finish flush with the top of the beam shelf.
    IMG-2079.jpg
    This image shows the sawn beam fitted with the curved frame/beam.
    Another lamination is in progress,this time laying back against the concave curve of the transom.
    IMG-2089 (1).jpg
    A straight batten was placed across the two existing beams and a temporary pattern cut to the camber at the aft most point.
    The batten had a tapered end with a pencil attached which transferred the line of the camber.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    There are good reasons for not butting the stern sheets hard against the transom, but I guess that it is too late now.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  21. #56
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Thank you for your comment Nick.
    Please elaborate,I'm curious to know what the good reasons are.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-20-2020 at 07:25 PM.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Thank you for your comment Nick.
    Please elaborate,I'm curious to know what the good reasons are.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    There are two.
    On a conventionally built boat where the sheets are not glued and filleted in moisture can get trapped and start rot.
    On a narrower sterned boat, loose water can run aft, come up under the stern-sheets, and burst them upward without a gap to relieve the pressure.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  23. #58
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Yes...interesting and thank you for your reply.
    Well I can safely say that those two reasons will not apply in my case.
    All will be revealed in future posts.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  24. #59
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Your vision and craftsmanship are amazing.

  25. #60
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Mike,
    I have not made comment here as I have been enjoying the running commentary that you keep up in conjunction with your fine work of art. I will say that the West System red micro balloons are a very very good filler. I have them in the bottom of a boat I rebuilt forty years ago and they are as good as the day that they were knifed in. I tip my cap to you and your fine little ship!
    Jay

  26. #61
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Thanks Paul and Jay for those kind words and compliments.Glad you are enjoying the posts.
    It is encouraging for a newbee to the forum to see such comments coming from longstanding WoodenBoat Forum contributors.
    The repartee,opinions and conversations on this forum are not only informative but also in some cases just plain laugh out loud entertainment.There is something here for everyone.
    Plus it's full of lovely wooden boats.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Back to business..
    The aft beam was cut out to the camber line and the land angle shaped.It was then epoxied and screwed (from the inside)to the transom.
    IMG-2090.jpg
    A pattern was then made for the aft compartment divider that would also act as a transom knee.
    Out of recycled Kauri two 6mm (1/4") panels were made, then laminated together.
    IMG-2104.jpgIMG-2105.jpg
    The panel was then dry fitted while I sorted out the bottom frame of the bulkhead.
    The bottom frame was made from the offcut from the top beam lamination.
    This was scribed in.
    IMG-2106.jpg
    Once I was happy with the fit and alignment, it was the inevitable glue and screw.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Enough key board tapping for this morning.
    I'm about to head off for a sail in Janet,the other woman in my life.
    Janet was built here in New Zealand in 1902 to the design of Charles Bailey Jnr.
    I undertook an 18 month partial restoration and that's a whole other storey.
    She was relaunched back in July 2015.IMG_1049 (1) (1).jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-21-2020 at 06:39 PM.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Next came two small parts of the frame with a twist.These are the two almost vertical pieces one port,one starboard that complete the ring frame of the sternsheet bulkhead.
    They twist in opposite directions from top to bottom on a curved vertical plane.
    The laminates had to be made up with enough length and width to do the job.One twisting left top to bottom the other twisting right.
    I will let the photos tell the story.
    IMG-2122.jpgIMG-2124.jpgIMG-2125.jpgIMG-2127.jpgIMG-2126.jpg

  30. #65
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I then divided two compartments into four.
    I made a patterns of the two bulkheads required then used the outline of these to cut the permanent pieces out of 4 mm ply.I used plywood as a better bracing element,it's light plus it sped up the process.
    You will see in the images that follow, lodging and hanging knees have been fitted where necessary to strengthen the frame.
    IMG-2132.jpgIMG-2140.jpgIMG-2135.jpgIMG-2152.jpgIMG-2165.jpg
    After spot gluing the bulkheads in,fillets were applied all round then two more coats of epoxy were added.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Now to the curved bulkhead.
    The idea of creating a vertical match lined look appealed.
    Match lining in old wooden villas here in NZ was usually made from Rimu or Kauri.
    The linings are about 100 mm (4") wide and have a tongue and groove joint with a beveled top edge that creates a V when joined.
    The staves (as I shall call them) because they are following a curved line were made narrower,about 45 mm (1-3/4").
    IMG-2177.jpgIMG-2182.jpg
    I had to alter the angle of the V slightly between the concave and convex pieces so the V would look consistent.The flat edge bevel (the glued surface) also altered depending where each piece was placed on the curve.
    The timber I used is called Totara.These trees can grow up to 30 meters with a 2 meter diameter. Lighter than Kauri, it is also straight grained and has a natural resistance to rot.
    Primarily used by the Maori for wood carving and building their Waka,the traditionally built canoe.


    There are 52 staves that make up this bulkhead.Each one was scribed into the hull and dry fitted until all were in place.
    IMG-2169 (1).jpgIMG-2173.jpg
    A pencil trim line was drawn along the curve of the top beam on the back of the staves.
    After numbering each one they were removed then trimmed to the pencil line,sanded and epoxied back on.
    The edge of each stave had a fine coating of thickened epoxy applied as well.
    IMG-2212.jpg
    Two coats of epoxy sealer were also applied to the aft side of each stave before permanently glued.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 08-22-2020 at 06:45 PM.

  32. #67
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Beautiful work you are doing.
    I hope the epoxy and solid wood are going to be compatible for the longevity of your boat.
    Really enjoying your posts.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The next day the small panel pins were removed ,the top edge sanded flush where needed and epoxy sealer applied to the forward face.
    The inside face was lightly sanded, a fillet applied and when cured another coat of sealer added, ditto to the forward face later on.
    IMG-2333.jpgIMG-2332.jpgIMG-2225 (1).jpg

  34. #69
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    Beautiful work you are doing.
    I hope the epoxy and solid wood are going to be compatible for the longevity of your boat.
    Really enjoying your posts.
    Thank you Timo,glad you are enjoying the posts.

    Yes..well.. time will tell about the compatibility issue, but I'm reasonably confident ( now has fingers crossed behind back).
    I know the native timbers will outlast the plywood (and me) ,especially liberally coated with epoxy.
    The species of timber I am using here is very stable.
    We are blessed with some marvelous species of native timber in New Zealand.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Pattern making time again.This time for the panel that will seal the compartments.
    I will state here now that this panel will eventually be hidden by a removable Kauri seat, made in the traditional looking sternsheet manner.
    To make the pattern I placed sticky backed paper tabs around the three sides hard against the hull,sticky side up.
    The coreflute pattern I had used to gauge the look originally was then placed carefully over the tabs.This method gives the same result as the hot glued MDF technique used in forming the bulkhead patterns.
    IMG-2334.jpgIMG-2335.jpg
    This gave me the outline of the shape needed which was then transfered onto the 4 mm ply material.(Meranti BS 1088).
    The ply was cut and fitted,the forward edge was left slightly oversized then marked and trimmed once the panel was sitting correctly.
    The cutouts for the access hatches were then marked out and cut.
    The round hatches would sit flat on the panel due to their position.The rectangular hatches would not however due to the camber.
    IMG-2222.jpgIMG-2218.jpg
    As shown in the photos above ply was added,surrounding the openings. The round ones were placed on the underside to help stiffen the area and offer some substance for fixing.
    The rectangular surrounds were placed on top.These were shaped to fit the cambered surface therefore making the upper plane flat to allow the hatch to seal properly when fitted.
    The underside of the panel was sealed with epoxy.The gluing surfaces were abraded to key in the epoxy.

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