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Thread: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

  1. #386
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    That made me smile.
    I can confirm that you are definitely not hallucinating!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Glad to bring a smile to your face Ian.
    Cheers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Let´s see what happens when you hit the water.
    Maybe this boat will draw dolphins to it all time.
    Do you overbend against springback while laminating the frames?
    Good progress.
    Cheers Max
    Hi Max,
    The forward frames I did not overbend because the bevel on the bottom face of the frame was greater in this area of the hull.
    The pattern was made along the line of the forward face of the frame and the laminating blocks were then set out to this line. When the frame sprung back it was very close to the shape of the hull along the back face of the frame, kind of six of one ,half dozen of the other scenario really.
    The frames amidships have a flatter bevel, so these have been overbent a little at the outboard ends to allow for springback, which by the way was only about 5-6 mm at the gunnels.
    Bring on the dolphins.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  2. #387
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The four half frames have now been scribed in and scarfed over the keel timber to form two complete frames.

    IMG-4790.jpg

    They are dry fit at the moment as I still have to deal with the centerboard slot.
    The two patterns toward the stern are for the floor/frame.
    While the aft floor will be at the correct height to support the sole boards, the frames forward of this will have a floor timber attached to the top of each frame.
    These will form a plane that will rise about 15 mm toward the forward bulkhead to create a wider sole board area for future sleeping comfort.
    There will be no limber holes I have decided. There will be to many in this flat bottomed, battened boat, they will weaken the frames and be potential rot spots.
    I will just have to have a decent sponge.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-09-2021 at 03:01 PM.

  3. #388
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Looking awesome Mike.
    Man what a sisyphian task with all these stringer notches.
    Cheers Max

  4. #389
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Unbelievable Mike, how did you get those notches in , two different planes????

    as Max said sysip*^#, oh never mind , what he said. I had to go look that one up !!

    love your dolphin

  5. #390
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Looking awesome Mike.
    Man what a sisyphian task with all these stringer notches.
    Cheers Max
    Sis what!

    Cheers mate.


    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Unbelievable Mike, how did you get those notches in , two different planes????

    as Max said sysip*^#, oh never mind , what he said. I had to go look that one up !!

    love your dolphin
    Hi Andrew,
    The full width frames are scarfed over the keel. Each side was completed separately and then joined.

    I'm with you there Andrew ,I had to look that one up too.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  6. #391
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Sorry for that guys.
    Sisyphus Arbeit is a common saying in Germany just translated by the words.
    Doesn´t work out allways though...

  7. #392
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Sorry for that guys.
    Sisyphus Arbeit is a common saying in Germany just translated by the words.
    Doesn´t work out allways though...
    Maybe not a common saying, but certainly it _is_ a saying in English...

  8. #393
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Sorry for that guys.
    Sisyphus Arbeit is a common saying in Germany just translated by the words.
    Doesn´t work out allways though...
    No need to apologise Max, keep it coming, I enjoy the education.
    Now my whole family knows what sisyphean means.

    Though I must say that building this dinghy is a lot easier than continually pushing a boulder up a hill.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  9. #394
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The last frame and aft floor have been scribed in and dry fit.

    IMG-4812.jpg

    The outboard ends of the frame will be trimmed off flush with the floor.
    But before the frames can be permanently fixed and the floor height established, the old center board slot had to be filled in.

    IMG-4797.jpgIMG-4806.jpg

    The dinghy was suspended off the ceiling and then swung onto it's beam ends and secured, this allowed the interior and exterior surfaces to be simultaneously accessible, hence the odd photo angles.
    A straight router bit with a 2 inch cutting edge was just long enough to do the job.
    This removed the old paint and left a nice clean, parallel slot, which was then filled in with a length of Kauri and epoxy with a 413 filler mix.
    The dagger board case was then paced in it's pre determined position and the outline of this and the dagger board itself was drawn onto the keel timber.

    IMG-4808.jpgIMG-4807.jpg

    Using the end of the infill piece as a reference point I was able to transfer the outlines of the case and board onto the outer keel surface.
    I then milled up and shaped two cheeks for lateral support of the slot opening through the keel. They will also strengthen the fixing element for the base of the dagger board case directly above.
    These have now been epoxied in place, once cured the next step will be creating the new slot.

  10. #395
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Very nice!

  11. #396
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Very nice!
    Cheers Max, finally managed to get the dagger board slot in place, it has been on the job list for a while now.

    Now because of my mistrust of jigsaws accurately cutting anything thicker than 25 mm I removed the bulk of the timber in the slot with a number of different sized spade bits.
    The thickness of the keel at this point is about 60 mm.

    IMG-4817.jpgIMG-4819.jpg

    I drilled each hole to half depth from both sides to ensure I did not wander outside the dagger board profile lines.
    Next the dagger board profile pattern was placed on an offcut of MDF and a line was drawn 5 mm out around the perimeter, 2mm for board clearance plus 3 mm for the router collar.

    IMG-4822.jpgIMG-4824.jpg

    The jig was centered over the opening and the router then cleaned up the slot. The tail end of the slot was completed with a Japanese pull saw, chisel, round file and sandpaper.

    IMG-4828.jpg

    Then there was the obligatory test fit. The insides walls of the slot will be finished off with three coats of epoxy.

  12. #397
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Good job, Mike, as always. What's the router collar? I don't think mine has one.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #398
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Good job, Mike, as always. What's the router collar? I don't think mine has one.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Thanks Ian.

    A more accurate description would be a template guide bush, also called a jig plate, collar guide or template guide.

    collar 2.jpg
    Very handy.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  14. #399
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    No, mine doesn't have one of those. I don't think I've needed one so far. I only do simple stuff, and mostly in the table. Thanks for the info, Mike.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #400
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    No, mine doesn't have one of those. I don't think I've needed one so far. I only do simple stuff, and mostly in the table. Thanks for the info, Mike.

    Ian
    Hi Ian,

    Flush trim bits with the bearing are probably more commonly used as you don't have to calculate the offset of the guide bush.
    I mainly used mine with a tread/riser jig for cutting housings into stair stringers. It's just another option.
    Hope all is well with you.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  16. #401
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    With the slot filled in and the dagger board foil shape cut out I could now carry on with the frame installation.
    Again, the hull is hanging on it's beam ends to allow for easier working angles.
    The epoxy coating on the inside of the hull has been abraded with 80 grit paper, vacuumed then wiped with a rag.

    IMG-4901.jpgIMG-4853.jpg

    The frames were again dry fit, then screw fastened at the gunnel, keel and at a batten midway between.
    Apart from these three fixing points the rest of the frame will rely on the adhesive qualities of epoxy and 403 filler.
    A heavy pencil line was drawn along each side of the frame, this was then removed and masking tape applied along the line.
    Neat epoxy was brushed on to prime and left for a few minutes while I mixed 403 into the remainder of the epoxy.
    I pre primed the epoxied surface for that added key.

    IMG-4896.jpg


    The thickened epoxy was applied using the ol' sandwich bag method. This allowed quick application over the strakes and battens. I then used a chip brush to spread evenly.
    This was repeated on the frame itself. I did not pre prime the frame, as this is raw timber the 403 epoxy mix has suitable penetrating qualities on wood.
    The epoxy was laid on thick to fill any gaps and ensure a good bond.

    IMG-4897.jpgIMG-4900.jpg

    A chisel stick was used to remove the squeeze out, they are so good to use.
    The masking tape allowed for a quick and easy clean up on the hull which means less awkward sanding between all those battens in the future.
    I complete one frame half in the morning and it's opposite in the evening, this allows a good amount of time to do a non rushed clean job and no wasted epoxy cooking in the pot.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-19-2021 at 05:02 PM.

  17. #402
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Very clean work Mike,
    I seem to end up with the stuff everywhere

  18. #403
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    More good work, Mike.
    Thanks for the explanation of a template guide bush. No, I don't need one of those, so far.
    And thanks for your concern about my situation. I just have three more radiation treatments to go - tomorrow, Friday and Monday - and I will have an appointment in June with the specialist, for the final report, but I don't know the date yet. From what they told me after the chemo, that should be the end of it.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #404
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by WayneT View Post
    Very clean work Mike,
    I seem to end up with the stuff everywhere
    Thanks Wayne.
    Ah yes, sometimes epoxy seems able to move around by itself.
    I have a large roll of paper towels handy plus spare gloves and rags ready for every glue up session.
    Cheers.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    More good work, Mike.
    Thanks for the explanation of a template guide bush. No, I don't need one of those, so far.
    And thanks for your concern about my situation. I just have three more radiation treatments to go - tomorrow, Friday and Monday - and I will have an appointment in June with the specialist, for the final report, but I don't know the date yet. From what they told me after the chemo, that should be the end of it.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Your welcome Ian.

    Nearly there with the treatments, that will be a relief getting those all done and dusted.
    You will be back raising sails and trimming sheets before you know it.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  20. #405
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    All the frames have now been epoxied in place.
    The dinghy was then leveled and checked at each frame station.

    IMG-4911.jpgIMG-4913.jpg

    Two patterns have been made for an extra laminated floor which will sit adjacent to the mast step. This will help support the mast step plus the forward ends of the sole boards.
    A level temporary floor was placed while the laminates were curing to take the forward end of two mdf straight edges, the aft ends are supported on the permanent floor.
    These form a level plane across the dinghy.
    Battens made from scrap timber were hot glued to the underside of these straight edge supports alongside each frame.
    Next a line was drawn onto each batten flush with the top of each frame. The battens were removed and then bandsawn along the line creating a pattern.

    IMG-4917.jpgIMG-4919.jpg

    Having the accurate patterns allowed me to lay them on select pieces of Kauri where waste would be minimal.
    The floors were then cut from recycled timber, dry fit and checked with the straight edge.

    IMG-4922.jpg

  21. #406
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Neatly done!
    Watching your progress With pleassure.
    Not long before you can pull up the sails��

  22. #407
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Neatly done!
    Watching your progress With pleassure.
    Not long before you can pull up the sails��
    Thanks Max.
    Yeah pulling up the sails would be very nice, I daydream about it at least once a day... but there's still a little more to do.

    Which brings me to a part of the process that I have been looking forward to for a while now and that is setting out the shape of the cockpit coaming.

    IMG-4945.jpgIMG-4941.jpg

    The main reason for setting this up is to figure out the hanging knee sizes. The knees will be glued to the top end of each frame, against the hull above the sternsheets and along the inside of the transom.
    I also needed to check the opening of the hatch covers for clearance as well.
    The coaming will continue across the foredeck and meet at an apex just aft of the bowsprit heel.

    IMG-4942.jpgIMG-4946.jpg

    The aft section of the coaming will have a radius inside each aft quarter, more comfy to sit against plus it looks nice.
    The sheer lifts up quite considerably toward the transom which will be highlighted by the coaming as it curves up and around the stern.
    I'm also looking forward to shaping the deck camber onto the top of that transom.

  23. #408
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Oh yeah, stuff like playing around on laying out the coaming is exciting.
    Lookin really good mate.

  24. #409
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Oh yeah, stuff like playing around on laying out the coaming is exciting.
    Lookin really good mate.
    Cheers Max.
    I' m still playing around with it and have now decided to ditch the coaming over the foredeck idea.
    After all this time thinking that was the way it was going to be, well, the more I looked at it, the less I liked it.

    IMG-4960.jpgIMG-4961.jpg

    So I'm going with this idea now, a horseshoe shape, similar to what was originally there.
    Looks less cluttered up front and it fits with the dinghy hull shape more so.

  25. #410
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Before I started to make the knee patterns, a couple of stringers had to be made.
    The bottom end of each knee will sit on the stringer. The stringer itself will be fastened to each frame and to small blocks at each end against the bulkheads.
    Adding the stringer will help stiffen up the sheer strake area which will be supporting the side decks.

    IMG-4965.jpgIMG-4969.jpg

    The stringer will be run parallel to the sheer ( seen here marked out with a batten ) to keep the knee length constant for appearance sake.
    The thwart will seat onto the stringer with a small wedge shaped block on top of the stringer to help support the outboard end.
    Six lengths (9 mm by 32 mm) of Matai were milled up to give a finished dimension of 25 mm by 30 mm for each side.
    The Matai timber used was from an old indoor bench seat, very straight grained and quite hard.
    The timber machines well and has good dimensional stability, made good weatherboards back in the day.
    Three lengths were then dry fit to length port and starboard.

    IMG-4975.jpgIMG-4986.jpg

    The stringer was then laminated ( epoxy, 403 filler ) in place against the frames with a thin plastic barrier between frame and stringer.
    When the epoxy reached a green state, kind of like hard chewing gum, I removed the stringer and using a sharp chisel paired most of the epoxy from the surface of the timber.
    The stringers were then finished using the belt sander and sanding block once the epoxy had hardened.
    In this case there was minimal spring back due to the shallow arc of the stringer.
    In the above right photo the stringers are just sitting in place with no clamps or fixings.

    IMG-4985.jpg

    The top and back edges between the frames were finished off with a 1/8 radius round over bit and the lower front edge was given the edge bead treatment.
    The stringers will be temporarily fastened until the knees are fit then removed and epoxy sealed before permanent fixing.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-31-2021 at 04:19 AM.

  26. #411
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Really good, Mike. You're making good use of recycled native timbers, and lucky to get them, I'd say. Your dinghy is fortunate in its owner.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  27. #412
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Lovley!
    The CB-case goes along nicely with the bulkheads too.
    I can allready imagine that the looks of your dinghy will be a blast when finished!
    Coat 3 on at my CH21 two more to go and sanding sanding sanding ;-)

  28. #413
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Really good, Mike. You're making good use of recycled native timbers, and lucky to get them, I'd say. Your dinghy is fortunate in its owner.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Thanks Ian, I have been collecting more timber of late, mostly Rimu but a bit of Matai and a touch of Kauri.
    The racks are full and I'm fast running out of floor space but it's hard to see good timber going to waste.

    IMG-5001.jpgIMG-5003.jpg

    The Rimu paneling came out of a mates house, 200 x 17 x 1.8 m about 30 lengths, he said take it away, it would save him the dump fees.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Lovley!
    The CB-case goes along nicely with the bulkheads too.
    I can allready imagine that the looks of your dinghy will be a blast when finished!
    Coat 3 on at my CH21 two more to go and sanding sanding sanding ;-)
    Thanks Max, The dinghy is starting to look a little more nautical. I can see a fair amount of painting in my future too and I'm actually looking forward to it.
    The hull paint will contrast nicely with the brightwork.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 06-01-2021 at 03:44 AM.

  29. #414
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I have made up a few knee patterns, shaping the foot and the outboard edge to seat against the stringer and frame respectively.

    IMG-5006.jpgIMG-5007.jpg

    A straight edge was then placed athwartships as shown and a line drawn onto the pattern piece at each frame station. There were a couple of extra patterns each side positioned above the sternsheets as well.
    The deck camber lines for each station were drawn onto a flat surface and the pattern placed over this. The camber line was then transferred onto the pattern.
    Measurements ( gunnel to coaming batten) taken from the batten setout as shown in post # 409 were transferred onto the coaming line.
    A line was then drawn perpendicular to this which will be the carlin bearing surface, this will cause the coaming to lean slightly outboard along it's top edge.

    IMG-5011.jpg

    Here the knee patterns have been shaped and hot glued in to check the coaming for fair. The two aft knees will also have the dual purpose of holding the sternsheets in place.
    The carlin will join into a beam rebated over the top of the bulkhead staves at a point directly in line with the outboard edge of the bulkhead hatch.
    The forward curved carlin will be laminated and fit separately.
    The next task is to make that rebated beam.

  30. #415
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Due to the deck camber curvature the rebated beam was made in two halves so two narrower pieces could be utilized thereby minimizing waste.
    Three laminates 5 mm thick by 50 mm wide by 900 mm long were epoxied together, wrapped in a thin sheet of plastic then clamped using the curve of the bulkhead as a jig.

    IMG-5013.jpg

    Once cured, the deck camber was drawn onto the lower edge of the beam, cut out on the band saw then rebated with a router.
    The beam was then glued against the bulkhead beam. The top edge was trimmed down to the deck camber after the epoxy had hardened.

    IMG-5023.jpg

    In the above photo the dinghy has been hung upside down so I could fill in the V of the staves with epoxy and clean up the hatch rebates.

    IMG-5030.jpg

    The beam now sits over the top of the staves and a slightly deeper rebate was made to house the top of the hatch doors.
    None of this will be seen however due to the new cockpit coaming forming on the inside.

    IMG-5037.jpgIMG-5034.jpg

    I have also made up some faux frame ends, these will help secure the sternsheets, which will slide underneath and also back the knees ( shown here with the patterns) that will support the side decks.
    Now working out the knee angles that will support the aft deck, beam and traveler blocking.

  31. #416
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Finally cut the deck camber onto the transom.
    Good to see it without the lifting bracket attached.
    Looking forward to getting a bit of gloss onto that, it will highlight those two seagulls flying in the grain of the timber.

    IMG-5040.jpgIMG-5041 (1).jpg

    Amazing how the camera angle alters the perspective.
    The right photo is a more accurate image of the actual profile.

    IMG-5056.jpg

    Kicks up a bit too, exaggerated by the fact that the deepest part of the sheer is positioned just at the forward edge of the sternsheets.
    Bit of work to do on the outside, most of those holes will be covered by upper and lower rubbing strakes.

  32. #417
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Great progress, Mike. I like the seagulls, and the dolphin, and the jaunty sheer! That boat wants to go to sea!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 06-07-2021 at 07:00 PM.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #418
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Lovely work as usual Mike. I'm jealous of your timber stash, I’ve got a couple of slabs of NZ Kauri (swamp kauri from south of AKL) about 1500mm x 300mm x 60mm that I’ve been holding on to for about 35 - 40 years so far as I’ve not been game to cut them up and make anything from them.....yet.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  34. #419
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    495

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Great progress, Mike. I like the seagulls, and the dolphin, and the jaunty sheer! That boat wants to go to sea!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Thanks Ian. It sure does, can't wait. With the rate the flora is producing fauna I'll have a regular ecosystem hapnin' by launch day.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Lovely work as usual Mike. I'm jealous of your timber stash, I’ve got a couple of slabs of NZ Kauri (swamp kauri from south of AKL) about 1500mm x 300mm x 60mm that I’ve been holding on to for about 35 - 40 years so far as I’ve not been game to cut them up and make anything from them.....yet.
    Thanks Greg. That's one of the good things about Kauri, it doesn't go off in a hurry. I'm sure a man of your capabilities will make something memorable from it one day.
    The remainder of the recycled Kauri I'm using on the dinghy was originally intended for a larger boat project ( what that particular project was going to be, I had no idea).
    It sat around for quite a while, probably because it had to many nail holes in it for the intended purpose.
    A bed retailer in town asked me to make a bed for the store, "Something different" he said. Lightbulb moment.
    I ended up making three which used the majority of it.

    Kauri bed.jpgkauri bed 6.jpgKauri bed 5.jpgkauri bed 3.jpg

    This particular bed is held together by four forked wedged tenons. The head and tail boards have bowtie splines down each side.
    The shiny spots are the heads of tacks used to fasten hessian to the walls prior to hanging the wallpaper.
    The saw marks from the mill are still visible in some areas as well.
    The slats are Matai.
    Finished off with Haarlem oil ( a tung oil variant) and polyurethane mix.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 06-08-2021 at 12:50 AM.

  35. #420
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    6,207

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Lovely work as usual Mike. I'm jealous of your timber stash, I’ve got a couple of slabs of NZ Kauri (swamp kauri from south of AKL) about 1500mm x 300mm x 60mm that I’ve been holding on to for about 35 - 40 years so far as I’ve not been game to cut them up and make anything from them.....yet.
    That'd be plenty to do a beautiful cabin sole of say, a H28...?

    Still admiring your process and output Mike, its looking great.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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