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Thread: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

  1. #141
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Well...that plan in the last post may have gone out the window. Laminated or splined joint knees incorporating the deck support may be the go now.

    IMG-3068.jpgIMG-3066.jpg
    Speaking of which...more laminating completed, despite a good weekend of surf.
    Foredeck beams, for'ard bulkhead/deck beam, aft deckbeam/carlin. Frames next...bit of work to do.
    You gotta love it.
    Most of the timber used here is from an old Kauri fireplace surround given to me about 10 years ago.
    It was nothing special but I knew I would use the timber one day.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 10-19-2020 at 02:15 PM.

  2. #142
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Man, I'm getting worried you're going to wear yourself out before you get to that 12 ft badly built clinker pig of a Cox design I've got sitting on the top of the pallet racking.

  3. #143
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Man, I'm getting worried you're going to wear yourself out before you get to that 12 ft badly built clinker pig of a Cox design I've got sitting on the top of the pallet racking.
    Ha! Yeah naa. A man has his limits, no amount of caffeine and epoxy dust can keep one going forever.
    I do know a Viking though that is looking for a suitable vessel to help him on his way to Valhalla.

  4. #144
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Well, lucky us here in the Hawkes Bay of NZ, we have a four day weekend. Hawkes Bay Day Friday. Labour Day Monday.
    One of those days I will be out on the water. The other days, family commitments aside, will be spent in the workshop tackling the job I have been procrastinating about.
    That is...sanding the hull interior, fairing, sanding again, then followed by two quick coats of epoxy and sanding again.
    IMG-3078.jpg
    Got a jump on it and spent 2 hours this evening sanding the port side.
    Thought it best to get this sorted before those deck and bulkhead beams got in the way.

    IMG-3082.jpg
    This is the Kauri offcuts department.
    These are the remnants of past creations. This timber is like gold to me, so of course I keep every little scrap.
    Some of these pieces will become parts of a breasthook,lodging and hanging knees plus any other blocking or whatever needed.
    Bring on the weekend.

  5. #145
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    sanding fairing sanding ...
    Man I know this task!

  6. #146
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    sanding fairing sanding ...
    Man I know this task!
    You got it Max.
    Just spent most of the day sanding, fairing tomorrow to satisfy the OCD.
    The thing is...most of the aesthetic of all this labour intensive activity will not be seen.
    It will however make for a less waterlogged boat when finished.

  7. #147
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.



    Spent the morning filling in imperfections on the dinghy. Now curing.
    Spent the afternoon sailing in perfection on the Janet.1902 Bailey. Now cured.

    Had Trusty Rusty the headsail on. An oldie but a goody off the wind.
    A little off thread but hey ..variety is the spice of life.

  8. #148
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Well, extended weekend goal achieved . Bit of sanding and fairing mainly to old scarf joints and batten damage from the old ribs.
    This was then followed by two coats of epoxy on the hull interior.

    IMG-3093.jpgIMG-3108.jpg

    Hung the boat upside down with a heater underneath to speed things up between coats. Used the sticky tape method to test the first coat for a primary bond of the second.

    IMG-3115.jpgIMG-3120.jpg

    Threw a coat on the fairing compounds on the fore and aft compartments to seal them up as well.80 grit prep to key in the epoxy on those.
    Next will be a bit of a wash and scrub followed by the inevitable sanding prep for future painting and gluing ...and then... I can finally get on with that deck framing.

  9. #149
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post

    Spent the morning filling in imperfections on the dinghy. Now curing.
    Spent the afternoon sailing in perfection on the Janet.1902 Bailey. Now cured.

    Had Trusty Rusty the headsail on. An oldie but a goody off the wind.
    A little off thread but hey ..variety is the spice of life.

    That’s just the sort of “off thread” that we all like.

    I’ve been parked inside for the afternoon listening very happily to the rain filling my tanks and bringing some greenery back to the block - while not so happily completing my BAS (Business Activity Statement for quarterly GST returns) and that little sailing clip was just the diversion and perk up that I needed.....so thanks for that Mike.
    cheers
    Greg
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    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  10. #150
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    That’s just the sort of “off thread” that we all like.

    I’ve been parked inside for the afternoon listening very happily to the rain filling my tanks and bringing some greenery back to the block - while not so happily completing my BAS (Business Activity Statement for quarterly GST returns) and that little sailing clip was just the diversion and perk up that I needed.....so thanks for that Mike.
    cheers
    Greg
    AAhh, gst returns. I remember those days...went a bit "off thread" again yesterday to clear the head of epoxy odours. Salt laden sea air, it's a cure all.
    Glad to have helped in the perk up dept.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  11. #151
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    After scrubbing down the dinghy interior to remove any amine bloom, I then sanded the forward area and washed again in preparation for the deck beams and bulkhead framing.
    Easier to do it before the added timbers got in the way.

    IMG-3133.jpg

    The bulkhead deck beam and the two deck beams forward were then fitted temporarily according to their designed camber widths/beam.
    The mast will eventually attach at the centre of the bulkhead beam when stepped. The adjacent deck beam is there to add lateral support.

    IMG-3135 (1).jpgIMG-3136.jpgIMG-3143.jpg

    Next a breasthook template was made involving two pieces of mdf.
    Two pieces of Kauri with a reasonable flat sawn grain were selected. The edge grain was run parallel to the inwales.
    The diagonal end grain joining surfaces were routered with a slot to take a fillet. This was then glued together using a polyurethane glue.
    The fillet is not centered as the king plank will be half lapped into the breasthook .

    IMG-3138.jpg

    A king plank was laminated up of two 7.5mm thick by 100mm wide strips. This was clamped from the stem to the bulkhead beam to form to the sheer.
    A small block was placed under the stem end to allow for spring back. Will find out tomorrow if it was enough.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 11-01-2020 at 02:19 AM.

  12. #152
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The breasthook was shaped to fit against the hull sides, rebated to fit under and against the inwales and also notched around the stem.
    It is held in place by screws through the wales.

    IMG-3148.jpgIMG-3147.jpg

    The the outer aft corners of the breasthook finish about 5mm higher than the inwales to allow for a camber to be shaped into it. The forward end is flush.

    IMG-3153.jpg

    Using a router, a 10mm rebate was made in the breasthook to take the king plank. The king plank was also rebated, but only 6mm to create a lap joint.
    The king plank finishes 1mm above the breasthook and beams, so when a camber is formed it will finish flush.
    The stem is also partly rebated to take the end of the plank and fastenings.

    IMG-3151.jpgIMG-3152.jpg

    The two deck beams and the king plank were notched to create lap joints ( cross and T halving).
    I thought about getting fancy with dovetails at the ends but with glue, screws and glass covered plywood decking...well I think it will be secure enough.

  13. #153
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The king plank was then dry fitted, this and the breasthook were then primarily planed to the shape of the camber. Final shaping will be completed when glued.

    IMG-3164.jpgIMG-3170.jpgIMG-3166.jpg

    It is not so pronounced in these photos but the sheer lifts significantly toward the bow.

    IMG-3146.jpg

    Trying to clamp down a solid plank of the same scantlings to the forward deck beam would cause unnecessary tension.
    Laminating the king plank to the sheer avoids this and provides a stronger form.

    IMG-3172.jpg

    A small detail. The rabbets/rebates in the king plank were cut partially into only one of the laminates to maintain some integrity.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 11-01-2020 at 04:00 PM.

  14. #154
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Lovely as ever.
    Good progess mate.
    That Kauri looks really nice.

  15. #155
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Lovely as ever.
    Good progess mate.
    That Kauri looks really nice.
    Thank you Max.
    The Kauri not only looks nice, it is a great timber to machine and work with hand tools.
    These foredeck timbers however will eventually be sealed with epoxy and then painted with enamels.

  16. #156
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    One of the pleasures of all this messing about with boats business is the satisfaction you get from even the smallest of completed tasks.
    The task at hand was to make a small hanging knee to support the breast hook.
    To keep it simple, I decided on making it in two pieces with a blind spline to strengthen the joint.

    IMG-3175.jpgIMG-3177.jpg

    A pattern was made and a line bisecting the angle drawn to obtain two parts.
    A piece of kauri was selected with the grain running parallel to the bearing edges and the shapes transferred to this.
    The bisecting angles were cut out on the mitre saw and glued together overnight. Next, some band saw and sanding station action to create the knee.
    The knee was then clamped to a flat board and passed across the saw to create a slot for the fillet.

    IMG-3179.jpgIMG-3185.jpg

    Fillet made and glued in. Then once cured, everything was cleaned up on the sander and a quarter round machined along the non bearing edge on the router table.

    IMG-3181.jpg

    Screw holes drilled in the vertical leg. The horizontal leg was fixed down through the breast hook.
    Dry fitted, a satisfying result.

  17. #157
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The next task was to make two hanging knee patterns.

    IMG-3205.jpg

    As you can see, they seat onto the top of the forward compartment. This will create a kind of ring frame in conjunction with the bulkhead.

    IMG-3204.jpg

    A laminated block was made from Kauri offcuts. I actually made two blocks. The other one is for the hanging knees on the next beam aft.

    IMG-3194.jpg

    While waiting for the epoxy to cure I made a rebated fiddle to fit along the top edge of the forward bulkhead.
    This will not only help seal the edge of the plywood, it will also act as a fixing point for a net that will also attach to the overhead beam.
    The purpose of the net of course is to contain stored items when sailing.

    IMG-3202.jpg

    After a fair amount of shaping involving an adjustable bevel, a band saw, belt sander, 4' grinder with sanding disc, files and sandpaper the job was done.

    IMG-3201.jpg

    The fiddle was rebated around the base of the knee.
    Here the knee is dry fitted. I angled the inner face of the knee parallel to the outer face to maintain thickness.

  18. #158
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    When the knees are glued in, fillets will be applied along the edges against the hull.
    The fiddle will also have a fillet along it's forward bottom edge.

    IMG-3199.jpgIMG-3196.jpg

    As you can see a sturdy frame has been constructed using the bulkhead as a bracing element. Lodging knees will also be added to the deck beam.

  19. #159
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    It is now coming to a challenging part of the forward bulkhead build.
    The idea is to create a ring frame around the entire edge of the bulkhead similar to what was done on the stern sheet bulkhead.
    The forward bulkhead is larger of course and will incorporate two hatches.
    IMG-3187 (1).jpg

    The face of the bulkhead beam was not vertical due to the fact that I have set the top edge of the beams to line up with the sheer.
    This meant that the top edge corner had to relieved about 1/8" to nothing down the face.
    This was done with a series of saw cuts as a depth guide for the plane.
    The plane has a convex sole, which when worked at an angle, allows it to plane along the curved surface. Cleaned up on the sanding station and with a flexible sanding batten.

    IMG-3208.jpg

    The beam line was transferred ( found my plumb bob )to the hull, shown by the faint pencil line.
    Now, all I have to do is figure out the most practical and efficient way to make the frame.

    IMG-3207.jpg

    The hanging knees on the other deck beam have also been dry fitted.

  20. #160
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    After mulling over a few different ideas in ways to construct the frame, a decision was made so I could just get on with it.

    IMG-3214.jpg

    A form was constructed in the horizontal that replicated the vertical curve of the bulkhead.
    Both port and starboard frames will be made separately on this.

    IMG-3212.jpgIMG-3217.jpg

    This is the starboard frame pattern completed. The offcut from the bulkhead deck beam provides the ideal curve with which to attach the pattern battens.
    The pattern will be laid over the form. This will determine the layout of the laminates for the frame and it will also provide an accurate frame profile.

  21. #161
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    IMG-3218.jpg

    So the dinghy brig is just about complete.
    A cramped space for unruly crew.

    IMG-3219.jpg

    This is the completed pattern of the hull shape for the bulkhead frame.

    IMG-3224.jpgIMG-3225.jpg

    The pattern is then laid on the bulkhead curve profile to establish the run of the frame laminates.
    There will be 5 laminates of 4 mm with staggered joins formed over this profile.

    A similar approach to the stern sheet planking support frame pictured below.

    IMG-2410.jpg

  22. #162
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Very inspiring. Looking forward to more.
    Have fun
    Max

  23. #163
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Next job was to make up patterns for the frame members.
    The overall shape was derived from the stick pattern.

    IMG-3236.jpg

    These are they. There are five laminations of 4mm thick per frame.
    4 pieces per lamination, times 10 laminations, equals 40 parts.
    As you can see there are two different make ups. These will alternate when glued to stagger the edge joins.

    IMG-3227.jpgIMG-3228.jpg

    The timber selected was a length of Kahikatea. This is a native NZ species. They are the tallest of the native trees (current tallest 185ft).
    Lighter than Kauri but not as durable the timber is straight grained and knot free.
    This piece is CCA treated. It was a stretcher piece on a bench top frame from a demolished laundry room.
    It was ripped into 5 lengths and run through the thicknesser. I was able to get the eight pattern shapes out of each length.

    IMG-3237.jpgIMG-3241.jpg

    The laminations were made up by edge gluing the corresponding pieces together.
    I used a waterproof PVA for this to speed up the process.
    The right image shows the order in which they will be glued to stagger the edge joins.

  24. #164
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The laminations were then epoxy primed and then glued together using the 403 microfiber blended epoxy.

    IMG-3245.jpgIMG-3244.jpg

    They were then laid and clamped over the form being careful to keep outside the finished frame line.

    IMG-3249.jpgIMG-3252.jpg

    This is the result.
    The next task is to transfer the stick pattern profile to the laminate and then whittle away to fit.

    IMG-3251.jpg

    Popped it into the dinghy to check the curves both ways... all good.

  25. #165
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A great job you're making there, Mike.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #166
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    A great job you're making there, Mike.

    Ian
    Cheers Ian.
    I'm currently scribing in that frame. She's a bit of work.
    I'm toying with the idea of getting one of those Makita mini belt sanders, so I can carve out all those batten profiles. The 4" grinder with sanding disc is a little...well...abrasive.

  27. #167
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The particular tool that I wanted for this job is not available in NZ until the end of next month...so that's Christmas taken care of.
    What I did get was a couple of those flap discs for the grinder with a wide squared edge, worked perfectly for the batten profile cutouts.

    IMG-3287.jpgIMG-3272.jpg

    Cutting around the pattern line on the frame left a square edge which then had to be shaped to the hull, which of course alters continuously along the frame.
    This involved marking, sanding, placing in, marking, taking out, sanding etc etc until it fit.
    Finished off with a coarse file.

    IMG-3289.jpg

    A line was marked 50mm (2") along the frame parallel to the bottom edge.
    The blade was then kept parallel to the seating edge of the frame when cutting out.
    Cleaned up with the grinder, furniture scraper and sandpaper on a flexible batten.

    IMG-3278.jpgIMG-3284.jpg

    Shown here just placed in.
    Next job is to predrill through the battens for the screw fixings.
    Then figuring out the size of the hatches and associated framing.

  28. #168
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I never thought about using the squared edge of these discs.
    Nice idea, I will try that out soon.
    Absolute fantastic work. A joy to watch your progress.
    cheers
    Max

  29. #169
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Nicely done! Your standards are impressive, its fun to watch. I have one of those little Makita 1" belt sanders, and while I dont reach for it often, the times I have it was a huge timesaver. I think its worth having around. A note though, the belts dont save real well, so dont stock up too much: the glue at the join fails at a younger age than one might think. The belt I've used were Makita badged, I've not looked around for another source but might be worth it.
    Brian

  30. #170
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    I never thought about using the squared edge of these discs.
    Nice idea, I will try that out soon.
    Absolute fantastic work. A joy to watch your progress.
    cheers
    Max
    Thanks Max.
    The discs work really well, though be warned, use a delicate touch.
    As as you can imagine, they can eat wood.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  31. #171
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Nicely done! Your standards are impressive, its fun to watch. I have one of those little Makita 1" belt sanders, and while I dont reach for it often, the times I have it was a huge timesaver. I think its worth having around. A note though, the belts dont save real well, so dont stock up too much: the glue at the join fails at a younger age than one might think. The belt I've used were Makita badged, I've not looked around for another source but might be worth it.
    Brian
    Thanks for the heads up there Brian.
    I have my eye on the 18 V cordless, brushless, 6, 9, 13 mmm belt model.
    I was told only yesterday about purchasing wider belts of similar length and cutting them into strips to suit. Will look into that.
    The amount of times I'm in the middle of some task and think, one of those mini belt sanders would do this job a lot quicker and easier... and then forget about it.
    Well... Christmas is coming.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  32. #172
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Well after a brief hiatus I am back into it. So a quick post.
    I thought it would be a good idea to permanently attach some of the pieces before I got too far ahead of myself.

    IMG-3291.jpg

    As you can see I have masked around all the areas to be epoxied.
    This was so I could prime the surfaces quickly which speeds up the thickened epoxy application and fixing process.
    Clean up is quick with a chisel stick ( Thank you Russell Brown).
    Best to remove the tape as soon as possible to avoid being held by any epoxy. Leaves a nice clean join especially on the internal corners, no sanding in tight places and is ready to go for filleting.
    The king plank is still dry fitted. This is so it can be removed for easier access to the forward areas when painting commences.
    Lodging knees tomorrow.

  33. #173
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Installed a few lodging knees yesterday.
    Now some may think this a bit overkill with a glassed (4mm) plywood deck overlay and all, but I have a bit of a belts and braces attitude.
    I am conscious of added weight but err on the side of strength over weight and there are a few more knees to go in yet.

    IMG-3304.jpg

    She's a beamy boat and there is going to be a bit of twisting going on up on that foredeck with a bowsprit and a keel stepped mast also attached at the deck beam.
    This of course will be supported by the bulkhead frames that form a ring frame when completed.

    IMG-3295.jpg

    Speaking of which, I weighed the two laminated bulkhead frames just to satisfy my curiosity.
    They are 21mm (3/4") by 50mm (2") and 900mm (3') long.
    Each one weighs just 500 grams (1.1 lbs).
    Light and strong, Kahikatea, you beauty.

  34. #174
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The bulkhead deck beam is now permanently glued in.
    Two triangular filler pieces have also been glued in. These are only 15 mm thick at the ends and 20 mm thick midway due to being glued in as a flat board and then shaped to the deck camber.
    These two pieces were made from old kauri floorboards.
    At the thin end of the wedge a fillet mixture has been packed in to fill the gap.

    IMG-3350.jpg

    I have also rebated the mast step to take a small floor (I shall call it) to help tie the bulkhead frames together.

    IMG-3354.jpg

    The frames were then glued in. Rebates were cut in at the ends of each frame, one to take the floor the other to take the hanging knee.

    IMG-3356.jpgIMG-3359.jpg

    Using an offcut from a beam lamination allowed the floor to conform to the curve of the frames.
    This floor will also support a stanchion timber which I will show in the next post.

  35. #175
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    So for a stanchion timber I found an old Kauri ironing board about the right thickness.
    The stanchion will help support the mast collar area on the deck beam.
    It will also be the inboard edge of the support frame for the bulkhead hatches to seat against. The deck beam will form the top edge of the support frame.
    A transom piece and two smaller stanchions when added will make up the rest of the hatch opening.
    The photos below show everything dry fitted.

    IMG-3365.jpg

    The face of the stanchion timber was lightly concaved to form to the bulkhead curve.

    IMG-3367.jpg

    Rebates were cut into the beam and the top of the stanchion. This formed a blind lap joint.

    IMG-3366.jpg

    Slots were cut into the top of the floor and the bottom of the stanchion to take a wooden fillet.
    So apart from pre drilling the screw holes, everything is ready to glue up.

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