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Thread: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

  1. #666
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    So.. nearly done with these sole boards, it's been three months since the timber was first prepped. There has been a few distractions but it certainly has been an ongoing process and I've enjoyed every minute of it.
    The panel ribs have now been glued and screwed into position and two coats of epoxy applied to each of them.
    Some of the rib ends had to be scribed to fit over the hull lap battens and to seat against the contours of the frame and floor timbers.

    IMG-7141.jpg

    Tape was placed along side each rib for the gluing and epoxy coating tasks. This does not take long and I do this to keep sanding and clean up to a minimum.
    The screws were left in and the countersunk recesses filled with 417/epoxy fairing.

    IMG-7143.jpg

    The fairing was sanded flush with 80# grit and then the top of each sole given a final coat of epoxy.
    This was applied with a roller then tipped with a foam brush to create a smooth finish which will require minimal sanding, therefore leaving a thicker film.

    IMG-7148.jpg

    These will be left now for 48 hours to cure before sanding and painting.
    Meanwhile the retaining blocks will be glued in and prepped for painting also.

    IMG-7139.jpgIMG-7138.jpg

    When the ribs had been permanently fixed, the sole board ends were shaped to create an even gap along the bulkheads.
    This matches the end gap of the ceiling battens and creates a continued shadow line across the base of each bulkhead.
    The retaining toggles will be fit after the final coat of paint.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  2. #667
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Just re read my last post and I mentioned leaving the epoxy to cure for 48 hours before sanding and painting.
    I actually left it for 72 hours but as most of you know, epoxy takes a little longer to fully cure than that.
    When I did the machine sanding, it was with a shop vac attached, I wear a proper respirator, gloves and overalls.
    Hand sanding much the same.
    Just saying.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  3. #668
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Man, you are getting somewhere near the finishing line!
    It is amazing how much time an thoughts even go into some floor boards, isn´t it?

    Cheers
    Max

  4. #669
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Man, you are getting somewhere near the finishing line!
    It is amazing how much time an thoughts even go into some floor boards, isn´t it?

    Cheers
    Max
    Yes Max, the floorboards are nearly done, which is good because it feels like it is time to move on to other parts of the boat.
    Still the inlays to do but may leave that until after the top coats have been applied.

    First of the undercoats on today.

    IMG-7160.jpgIMG-7158.jpg

    Second coat tomorrow for a high build film in prep for sanding.
    The painted look certainly cleans things up.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  5. #670
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Looks amazing Mike! I know what you mean about how much time each step takes. Someone asked the other day the proverbial question "how long is this boat taking you?". I realized that I have spent about 6+ hours on the breast hook alone and not finished shaping it yet. You've had amazing attention to detail all along the way, and it shows!

    Ken
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  6. #671
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by KenStocker View Post
    Looks amazing Mike! I know what you mean about how much time each step takes. Someone asked the other day the proverbial question "how long is this boat taking you?". I realized that I have spent about 6+ hours on the breast hook alone and not finished shaping it yet. You've had amazing attention to detail all along the way, and it shows!

    Ken
    Thanks Ken.
    Taking 6+ hours on a breast hook to get it right is nothing when you will be looking at it for years to come.
    I can still hear the words from an old Nova Scotian boat builder "make it look right because it'll be lookin' right back atcha".

    I guess the thing about detail is to not to over do it, find that happy balance.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 06-04-2022 at 09:02 PM.
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  7. #672
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The sole and ceiling adventure is nearly complete.
    Glued, screwed and filleted in a number of small retainer blocks that will help secure and locate the sole panels and take any athwartship load off the toggle screws.

    IMG-7165.jpg

    Seen here in their undercoated state, the bevel on the end of the panel rib locates against the angled face of the block, the panel is slightly raised to show.
    There is some clearance so the surfaces will not bind.

    IMG-7166 (1).jpgIMG-7169.jpg

    Final fitting before removing and applying the top coat (colour yet to be determined).
    The ceiling has been fastened with raised countersunk slotted bronze screws.
    The screws will be dipped in Lanocote (a lanolin based product) for final fit, apart from it's obvious moisture barrier qualities, it also helps maintain the bronze colour of the screw head.


    IMG-7172.jpgIMG-7174.jpg

    These two photos show the forward ceiling blending into the sole and the shadow line detail between the boards and the bulkhead.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  8. #673
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Wow, it is amazing how paint changes the apperance.
    Lookin very elegant. Thumps up mate.

  9. #674
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Wow, it is amazing how paint changes the apperance.
    Lookin very elegant. Thumps up mate.
    Thanks Max.
    The photos do not do it justice really and that's just the undercoat.
    Still umming and ahing over colours, to many choices.
    It will be interesting to see how long it takes for the paint to get banged up once launched but hey, it's oil based enamel, easy fixed.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  10. #675
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Gorgeous work as usual Mike, I’ll be interested to see what colour you come up with.
    Larks

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  11. #676
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Gorgeous work as usual Mike, I’ll be interested to see what colour you come up with.
    Thanks Greg.

    Yeah..so will I.
    The thing is, if I don't like the initial colour, I'll just try another one... but getting it right the first time would be preferable.
    Because it is a wide open boat, I'm conscious of the glare factor.
    I would prefer a lighter colour, so the sheen will have to be considered as well.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  12. #677
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Thanks Max.
    The photos do not do it justice really and that's just the undercoat.
    Still umming and ahing over colours, to many choices.
    It will be interesting to see how long it takes for the paint to get banged up once launched but hey, it's oil based enamel, easy fixed.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    I am glad it is just the undercoat. White inside a boat on a bright day can be dazzling. I favour Atlantic Grey in Peerie Maa, but Champaign is also a good colour.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  13. #678
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Yep, I'm with Nick on this.... White looks awesome in the photos...all your work on the boat does actually...
    But white will be blinding in the sun.
    Low luster paint will help with glare too, but it gets dirty easier...so there may need to be some trade off there...
    Super job all around.

  14. #679
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I am glad it is just the undercoat. White inside a boat on a bright day can be dazzling. I favour Atlantic Grey in Peerie Maa, but Champaign is also a good colour.
    I hear you Nick, the Champagne colours are variable but I'm liking the tones.
    Thanks for the input.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    Yep, I'm with Nick on this.... White looks awesome in the photos...all your work on the boat does actually...
    But white will be blinding in the sun.
    Low luster paint will help with glare too, but it gets dirty easier...so there may need to be some trade off there...
    Super job all around.
    Thanks Timo.
    The white was never going to happen on the top surfaces and I'm with you on the low luster option.
    I've actually just painted the underside of the soles and ceilings with gloss white just for the very reason to aid in keeping the surfaces cleaner.
    IMG-7181.jpg
    Not seen, so a quick scrape to knock off the dust lumps then a top coat rolled on over the rolled undercoat ( less than a week old so no sanding required in this case).

    Thanks for the input Timo.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  15. #680
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A statutory holiday here today, spent most of it in the workshop cutting slots and laying teak into the sole boards.
    Decided to get on with it now before the top coats went on because I was going to draw lines everywhere.
    Previous, the tops of the ribs, retainer blocks and the area around the DB bedlogs had been cleaned up, some holes filled , undercoats and top coats on, ready for the ceiling battens and sole panels.

    IMG-7198.jpg

    It was then time to set out the teak inlays.
    The sole boards will be painted and probably a bit slippery when wet, so the purpose of these inlays is to offer some grip underfoot.
    The original intention was to lay two strips down each sloe board but upon placing them in position things started looking a bit busy, so I went with one.

    IMG-7191.jpgIMG-7202.jpg

    An arc was drawn across the soles to help gauge the look of the intended layout, the teak strips were placed temporarily in position to also figure out where they would finish off at the aft bulkhead.
    The two mid strips lay straight, the two adjacent strips either side curve along the mid point of their respective boards.
    A router jig was shaped to the two curves required then flipped and reused on the boards opposite.

    IMG-7224.jpgIMG-7218.jpg

    Here is the finished look.
    The teak will be glued in after the top coats have been applied.
    I stood in the boat to give it the sole to sole test...happy feet.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  16. #681
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    It looks absolutely fabulous! A couple of quick questions: How will you finish the teak so that it doesn't become as slick as what you started with? And secondly, you skipped the part that allowed you to come up with such even curvature and rounded ends on those teak strips. I know that isn't easy to do, and it looks like you found the right method for good results. Can you share that method?

    Ken
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

  17. #682
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by KenStocker View Post
    It looks absolutely fabulous! A couple of quick questions: How will you finish the teak so that it doesn't become as slick as what you started with? And secondly, you skipped the part that allowed you to come up with such even curvature and rounded ends on those teak strips. I know that isn't easy to do, and it looks like you found the right method for good results. Can you share that method?

    Ken
    Hi Ken,
    The intention is to leave the teak to weather, which means it will eventually turn grey and lose some of it's slick.
    Teak is naturally non slip anyway, hence it's use in this situation.
    As for the rounded ends, I used a teak strip (the end of which had been previously shaped into a matching router slot) as a pattern to draw the curve on each end.
    These were then shaped on a vertical disc sander followed by free hand sanding to round over and finish the semi circular shape.
    I would test the end in the router slot until the desired shape was attained.

    Thanks for the interest Ken.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  18. #683
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I just re read the last post and realised I had only answered part of your inquiry Ken.
    The curve athwartships around the forward ends of the teak strips was made by placing a batten at the center of the bulkhead and then simply tracing an arc across the sole boards.
    Where it passed across the centerline of each board was the finish point for each strip.

    IMG-7226.jpgIMG-7227.jpg

    The right image above shows the router slot in a block of wood that was used to gauge the finish of the teak ends.
    This particular strip was run through a thicknesser and has a flat top.
    I was considering doing this to maybe ease any discomfort underfoot, however the raised round is not uncomfortable plus it will also provide a better footing when the boat is heeled.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  19. #684
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Very nice, great technique! Great craftsmanship, and you make it look easy. (Of course we don't see the time and effort you took to get there!) The dark on white contrast is perfect.

    Ken
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

  20. #685
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Very well done, and something I´ve never seen before.
    In real life I like the teak inlays more than imagined.

    Cheers Max

  21. #686
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by KenStocker View Post
    Very nice, great technique! Great craftsmanship, and you make it look easy. (Of course we don't see the time and effort you took to get there!) The dark on white contrast is perfect.

    Ken
    Thanks Ken.

    Evolving ideas, the day started with one idea and finished with another.
    This is what makes the build so enjoyable.
    The white sole will probably not happen but another lighter shade of something will.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Very well done, and something I´ve never seen before.
    In real life I like the teak inlays more than imagined.

    Cheers Max
    Thank you Max.

    I'm not sure where the idea came from, but it just seemed to make practical sense. Do they even have a nautical name/description
    The raised ribs on a capstan barrel for grip and boom ends for roller reefing are called whelps. Those are situations where there is a rotation involved, but not in this case...unless I capsize.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  22. #687
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    My "new" race boat cockpit has similar strips of teak, but nowhere near as well executed.
    The grip is awesome when heeled, with anti skid paint between them to stop skidding along them.

  23. #688
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    My "new" race boat cockpit has similar strips of teak, but nowhere near as well executed.
    The grip is awesome when heeled, with anti skid paint between them to stop skidding along them.
    Hi Slacko,
    A wee story...
    I used to race on a boat called "Jive Talkin" a Davidson 35 way back when. Of course my job as the main sheet trimmer often involved hauling in metres of main sheet very quickly, especially just after a mark rounding.
    As the main came under load I would brace my feet against these raised strips on the deck, which was their purpose of course.
    One particular rounding during the first race of the Bay of Islands regatta I was braced against the deck blocks with a sizeable amount of mainsheet load being taken on my outstretched arms, when we hit a sizeable chop, my feet slipped off their support, I took off, pulled by the mainsheet, landing on the deck blocks with some force, the brunt of the impact being taken by my tail bone, otherwise known as the coccyx...quite painful.
    We had a Doc onboard who gave me some rather special painkillers, he said that it would numb the pain for the next few days of the regatta , which was great, they were fantastic pills, but then be prepared for some hurt afterward he said... I was prone...on my stomach... for a few days after the special ones wore off.
    The coccyx was fractured according to the X-ray...I found this out after the regatta.
    Nickname during the regatta 'Broken arse"...sailors humour eh.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 04-27-2022 at 01:16 PM.
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  24. #689
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The surf was running this past weekend, so time on the dinghy was a bit limited but a decision was made about colours and the foredeck was given a little reinforcing.

    IMG-7256.jpgIMG-7263.jpg

    A 15 mm (5/8") by 20mm (3/4") Kauri batten was let full depth into the breast hook and deck frames to add some support to the Dynel covered 4 mm plywood that will be used to cover the foredeck.
    The batten will halve the open area between the framing and reduce the risk of puncturing by a foot, elbow, knee or anything else solid enough to do some potential damage.
    Because the batten dimensions are relatively small, a stopped housing dado joint was used on the breast hook and the bulkhead deck frame to fully support the batten ends.
    A full depth notch and not a scarf, was made into the foredeck frame as well and because the batten was sprung into position and this joint would stop any twisting and the risk of snapping it.
    In the right image above the hull has been inverted so three coats of epoxy could be applied, these will not be painted as they are out of sight out of mind.

    IMG-7240.jpg

    Colour!
    A couple of the mdf patterns were painted with test pot choices to get an idea and these are the favourites so far.
    Highland green for the sole boards and hull, Dutch white for the ceilings, thwarts, DB case frame and deck.
    May even have a red sheer strake yet.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-02-2022 at 05:03 AM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  25. #690
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hello Mike,

    As usual I'm amazed at the curves and your execution of them.

    They're right out there... no place to hide... they're either right or they're not!

    Man you're really something.

    Regards,
    Alan

  26. #691
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan71 View Post
    Hello Mike,

    As usual I'm amazed at the curves and your execution of them.

    They're right out there... no place to hide... they're either right or they're not!

    Man you're really something.

    Regards,
    Alan
    Thank you Alan for the compliments.
    A lot of the curves on this boat have been obtained by evenly grained battens of varying lengths, widths and thicknesses.
    The outer stem profile, transom curve, cockpit coaming ring frame and sole boards spring to mind, no plan or numerous measurements, just a flexible stick that's pushed and pulled until it looks right.
    It's actually not that hard to do because the batten does all the work. Give it a crack Alan.
    I have probably mentioned this before but when I started this project, deciding to curve everything as much as possible kind of spun my wheels , so that's what's happening.
    Thanks again Alan for the positive comments.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

    IMG-7272.jpg

    Threw a final coat of 207 laced epoxy on the stringers this evening.
    It's not a superyacht varnish finish but it will do.
    Most of the stringer length will be covered by a removable, cylindrical shaped, inflatable buoyancy bag eventually, that will just tuck under the side decks. More of an open water precaution/option really.
    The bags will offer some comfort and pad the back of the legs when sitting on the side decks, they will also help keep the boat on top of the water, if and when it's full of water.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  27. #692
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Continuing with the various protective and aesthetic coatings I thought a sealer coat of 207 epoxy mix on the transom was due.
    The idea is to give the transom 3 coats of the 207 mix and if the finish of the final coat is good I will leave it at that, if not, then a couple of coats of two pot varnish will follow.
    I was surprised by the amount of reflection and refraction in the timber when the first coat went on, chatoyancy is the fancy word for it in this case.

    IMG-5041 (1).jpgIMG-7298.jpg
    IMG-7300.jpgIMG-7301.jpg

    The shadows and the golden hues move around the transom depending on where you stand in regard to the light, the photos do not do it justice really.
    This is only the first coat to raise the fuzzy bits before sanding them off. The depth of the finish should deepen with subsequent coats.
    Look forward to seeing it in the direct sunlight. Note the two flying seagull shadows.

    Received half the paint order today. Had to change the colour slightly to match with the RAL colour chart so Altex could tint it up with their specific base tints.
    It's called Pale Green...... I actually like it better than the original choice, slightly darker and richer. The white had to change slightly as well, fingers crossed on that one.
    Altex are awaiting the base tints for the white.

    IMG-7314.jpg

    The new green over the original choice.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-04-2022 at 04:28 AM.
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  28. #693
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Wow how nice.
    You are really getting somewhere.
    That green and the teak will be looking stunning together.

    Cheers
    Max

  29. #694
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Wow how nice.
    You are really getting somewhere.
    That green and the teak will be looking stunning together.

    Cheers
    Max
    Thanks Max.
    Things are ticking along nicely.
    Hope to get some colour on those sole boards this weekend.
    Meanwhile...
    IMG-7340.jpg
    The second coat of 207 epoxy was applied and I had good intentions of hot coating a third but, a couple of sandflies (having avoided the effects of the bug spray) decided that they would try and leave their dna permanently attached to the transom. Will sand them out tomorrow.
    That 207 epoxy flows nice if the resin is pre warmed a little before mixing.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  30. #695
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    And speaking of flowing, added a little enamel quick dry to the top coats for a harder finish, another plus is that it makes the paint flow right out.

    IMG-7360.jpgIMG-7363.jpg

    Final coat on the ceiling battens.
    This was applied with a short nap mohair roller and left to take care of itself.
    It was finished over a previous enamel coat that had been sanded with 220 grit.

    The DB case and the thwarts have their first topcoat on, paint rolled on over a 220 sanded undercoat and left. They will have one more coat.

    IMG-7415.jpgIMG-7413.jpg

    The sole boards were lightly sanded for the top coat key but not so smooth as to remove the roller stipple completely, this is to avoid a completely slick surface...I will review that after the first sail.

    The light in the above photos distorts the colour somewhat (both colours are actually slightly darker) but I'm very pleased with the contrast.
    In the direct sunlight the Oyster white is quite a creamy white, but out of it, tends to take on a very light beige tone.

    IMG-7419.jpg

    The dinghy hanging high to make room.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-08-2022 at 01:01 PM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  31. #696
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    888

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A second coat of enamel (with quick dry additive) was applied about 3 days ago to the sole boards, I thought that would be enough time for a little curing, so decided to press on with inlaying the teak strips.

    IMG-7424.jpgIMG-7425.jpg

    The tape inside the rebates was removed and the rebates wiped clean. The perimeters of the rebates were then taped as well as the top of each teak strip.
    The underside of the teak was wiped with an acetone soaked rag to remove any surface oils.
    The rebates and the strips were then primed with neat epoxy. The rebates were then given another brush with epoxy to fill any dull spots where the epoxy had soaked into the boards.
    The teak strips were made to press fit into the rebates thereby eliminating the use of cramps. There were no gaps to allow excess epoxy to escape, so neat epoxy was used.
    Using a slightly thickened epoxy may have stopped the strips from seating properly and not allowed the rounds to sit flush with the sole.

    IMG-7432.jpgIMG-7427.jpg

    The tape was removed after an hour or so, leaving an instantly clean finish.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  32. #697
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    969

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    She's coming up very nicely, Mike.
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #698
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    888

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    She's coming up very nicely, Mike.
    Ian
    Thank you Ian.
    Going out to the workshop now to temporarily place the sole boards and ceilings in, just to see how things look.
    Will post a photo a bit later.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  34. #699
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    5,159

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.



    I saw the pictures before reading the text, thought the purple was a pretty bold choice but kind of cool too.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  35. #700
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    888

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post


    I saw the pictures before reading the text, thought the purple was a pretty bold choice but kind of cool too.
    Yeah Steve, kinda cool and a little trippy, the psychedelic option
    Cheers.

    But this is how it turned out.

    IMG-7450.jpgIMG-7441.jpgIMG-7444.jpg

    When I finally get a finish on the DB case that I'm happy with and add that to the mix then things will really take shape.
    Fitting the ceilings has highlighted to me the need to paint the knees and strip above the stringer and the sternsheets the same Oyster white.
    The existing white now looks a little stark against the softer white.

    Accidently bumped into a freshly painted and happy with finish DB case today and created one of those situations where you know you shouldn't try and fix the blemish in the paint because you just know it will escalate into something worse...but do...and it does...had one of those today.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 05-14-2022 at 05:24 AM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

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