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Thread: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

  1. #631
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Port side initial fit completed. Interesting to note how the camera can distort the proportions as the ceiling battens are all the same width full length.
    IMG-6879.jpgIMG-6882.jpg
    The sole boards are 12 mm thick. The first two inboard ceiling battens are 10 mm thick. The next three reduce in thickness by 1mm respectively as they progress up the side of the hull. It will help in some small way to reduce weight at the gunnels and they should be less prone to full body weight forces...hopefully...depending on the crews ability to keep there feet of course.
    All the ends are yet to be trimmed to an even gap along the line of the bulkhead.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

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  2. #632
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    When I compare both sided. One with ceiling battens on, and one without.
    It showes how much these increase the good looks.
    I need to come back to the iron stains. I could easily live with them, all boards varnished.
    Actually I like them.
    Adds just a little bit more history to this lovely vessel.

    cheers
    Max

  3. #633
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Exceptional work as usual Mike, lovely stuff!!!
    Larks

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  4. #634
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    When I compare both sided. One with ceiling battens on, and one without.
    It showes how much these increase the good looks.
    I need to come back to the iron stains. I could easily live with them, all boards varnished.
    Actually I like them.
    Adds just a little bit more history to this lovely vessel.

    cheers
    Max
    Hi Max,
    You must have been reading my mind and I hear what you are saying.
    I have just applied some Haarlem Oil (Danish Oil, pine turpentine and the creators secret brew. Made locally and sold commercially by a mate).

    IMG-6888.jpg
    I did this to get an idea of the colour of the timber and the contrast of the stains.
    It seems a shame to paint all that timber, the more I lay into the boat the better it looks.
    There is still the slippery underfoot issue but the inlay idea may still work even with a clear finish.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Exceptional work as usual Mike, lovely stuff!!!
    Thanks very much Greg.
    Started on the starboard side this afternoon.
    Should move along a little quicker this side, a little repetition refines the method.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  5. #635
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    At last, both sides complete...well as far as the initial fitting goes anyway.
    IMG-6890.jpgIMG-6895.jpg

    The sole boards will have a final pass through the newly sharpened thicknesser followed by an edge bead along the top edge on one side, similar detailing to the sternsheets.
    The ceiling boards will be sanded and then a top edge radius routered along both sides.

    IMG-6899.jpgIMG-6898.jpg

    In the above images a wedge shaped timber is being shaped to fit forward on one side of the outer sole boards, this will blend the curved plane of the ceiling onto the sole.
    The sole will be made up of four separate sections, the decision now is where to make the athwartship cuts and place the support battens.
    These may have to be staggered due to the shape around the aft end of the DB case creating an unwanted short grained corner if a cut was to be made there.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  6. #636
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Are any of these boards easy to remove for bailing or retrieving small items or cleaning? How do you get water out? Tip and drain?

  7. #637
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hello Mike,

    Lovely Work!

    I really like the contrast of the white paint and bright finished sole and bulkheads.

    Any chance the the sole (6 pieces) could be bright and the ceiling (10 pieces) white?

    The area where all the materials, shapes, and finishes come together in the oval is quite remarkable to my eye!

    What a craftsman you are!.

    Regards,
    Alan




    IMG-6777.jpg

  8. #638
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    Are any of these boards easy to remove for bailing or retrieving small items or cleaning? How do you get water out? Tip and drain?
    The sole boards will be constructed into four removable sections made up of three boards each.
    IMG-6890 (1).jpgIMG-6890 (2).jpg
    The original idea was to make a cut across all of the sole boards along the line of the frame just aft of the DB case, as in the left image above.
    This would however create a short grained weak point by the aft tip of the DB case that would be prone to splitting or breaking off should it get a knock.
    The idea now is to stagger the joins, as in the right image above.
    The ceiling battens will be fixed with bronze screws... that have actually just arrived as I write this. Splendid.
    IMG-6901.jpg

    As far as water removal goes, the lack of limber holes means that each section will have to be bailed, then sponged out.
    I did not want to have limber holes in the frames, as this to me would have caused a weak point in the frame.
    I'm looking at making a portable, rechargeable battery powered bilge pump arrangement in a sealed container...with a hole in the appropriate place and a tube...that works on water contact.
    A clever chap here at the local sailing club made a number of them up for the quick bailing out of any junior dinghy racer when required. He would just throw the container into the bottom of the dinghy and away it would go.

    Thanks for the questions and interest.
    Cheers,
    Mike.




    Quote Originally Posted by Alan71 View Post
    Hello Mike,

    Lovely Work!

    I really like the contrast of the white paint and bright finished sole and bulkheads.

    Any chance the the sole (6 pieces) could be bright and the ceiling (10 pieces) white?

    The area where all the materials, shapes, and finishes come together in the oval is quite remarkable to my eye!

    What a craftsman you are!.

    Regards,
    Alan




    IMG-6777.jpg
    Thanks Alan.
    The ideas about paint, colours and finish are still being finalised but you could be on the money there about the contrasting sole and ceiling finishes.
    I was talking to an art teacher yesterday about this and her suggestion was similar to yours in regard to the clear finish on the sole.
    She said it would lengthen the boat to have the central boards highlighted in a different tone, maybe a good thing for a twelve foot boat.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  9. #639
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A minor hiccup but a hiccup just the same.
    The last of the six boards to pass through the drum sander resulted in this.
    IMG-6902.jpg
    A brief loss in feeder belt tension , anyway, the options now are to a) make a new one b) fill and paint c) reduce the thickness of the sole board.
    So, fate has decided, no clear finish, going with option b.
    I have some teak from a dismantled coffee table that will make some nice non skid inlays, which was the original plan way back when.
    C'est la vie.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  10. #640
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I look forward to seeing your inlays...
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

  11. #641
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    That would have caused some new blue language combo's, ouch!

  12. #642
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    That would have caused some new blue language combo's, ouch!
    Haha!You must have heard me from your house?
    Last edited by Mike1902; 03-05-2022 at 10:39 PM.
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  13. #643
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by KenStocker View Post
    I look forward to seeing your inlays...
    Hi Ken,
    Thank you and yes, so am I.
    Checked the limited teak stock today and with some careful milling I should have just enough for the job.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  14. #644
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Today a number of the smaller but necessary tasks were completed.
    IMG-6934.jpg
    Both of the wedge filler pieces ( post #635) were shaped to finish and epoxied to the sole boards.

    IMG-6917.jpg
    The forward end of each ceiling batten was scribed to fully rest against the frame, this is to avoid splitting when fastening the screws.

    IMG-6929.jpgIMG-6930.jpg
    A 5 mm square length of mdf was used to scribe a fair line around the flat faced staves of the bulkhead.
    This produces an even shadow line that will become more obvious once painted.

    IMG-6922.jpg
    One more image to use up the file allowance.
    The next task is to fill all the nail holes ,sand, then radius the edges.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  15. #645
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Ouch, didn´t know belt sanders can do such attacks.
    Sorry for that mate.
    I´m very curious about the inlays.

    cheers
    Max

  16. #646
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Ouch, didn´t know belt sanders can do such attacks.
    Sorry for that mate.
    I´m very curious about the inlays.

    cheers
    Max
    Hi Max,
    Thanks for the concern.
    It was a drum sander in this case which has the drum overhead and the work is fed through beneath it on a wide power driven belt.
    The belt stopped momentarily, probably due to lack of tension, strange though, as it had worked fine on the previous five boards.
    The pass was quite light, so not a lot of downward force, but the work stopped, the rotating drum gripped it pulling it up and continued to sand briefly before I hit the stop button, damage done.
    Looking at the positives, the inlays will look good I think, contrasting against a nicely painted background.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  17. #647
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    So looking at that last image in post #644 I realised that by scribing the bottom of the battens, it made for a shallower less shadowy shadow line.
    The thinner ends didn't thrill me either, still a chance of splits and cracks over time.
    So I glued strips of wood about 2 mm thick over the scribed curve of the batten.
    IMG-6936.jpg
    Which was pretty much what I did for the other rib contact points, which made me ponder, why didn't I do that in the first place.
    Anyway, the ends are thicker ,the shadow line is deeper and the cross grain will strengthen the screw holes.

    IMG-6938.jpg
    It's hard to see any difference but it's there...and I will see it every time I go sailing.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  18. #648
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    A minor hiccup but a hiccup just the same.
    The last of the six boards to pass through the drum sander resulted in this.
    IMG-6902.jpg
    A brief loss in feeder belt tension , anyway, the options now are to a) make a new one b) fill and paint c) reduce the thickness of the sole board.
    So, fate has decided, no clear finish, going with option b.
    I have some teak from a dismantled coffee table that will make some nice non skid inlays, which was the original plan way back when.
    C'est la vie.
    Couldn,t you use the underside as a mirrored upperside for its neighbour and vice versa?
    If that makes any sense…
    That way clear finish is stil possible

  19. #649
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by maarten View Post
    Couldn,t you use the underside as a mirrored upperside for its neighbour and vice versa?
    If that makes any sense…
    That way clear finish is stil possible
    That's a great idea Maarten and one that I did not think of myself.
    The two pieces could mirror each other as you say, unfortunately, the underside of each board resembles a dartboard and may be a little too busy for my taste.
    The upper surface of the sole where the mishap occurred was originally the back of the sarking board, so less tack holes and relatively clean.

    IMG-6940.jpgIMG-6939 (1).jpg
    The right image shows the original outer face and though the holes do not look like much in this photo, the example repeats down the length of the board. A bit to severe for my liking.
    As you can see, filling is under way, 407 fairing filler with West epoxy.
    Thank you for your contribution Maarten, the option was considered.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  20. #650
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The ceiling battens have been filled, sanded ,the top edges have a radius and two coats of epoxy have been applied to the edges and top, bottom tomorrow.
    IMG-6948.jpg

    The teak has been milled up and a test piece was inserted into a routered slot in some scrap timber to simulate how they will look on the sole.
    There will be two inserts per sole board. The idea is to also follow the curve of the outer sole boards where appropriate.

    IMG-6953.jpg

    The convex curve on the teak insert was made using a convex bit on the router table.
    IMG-6967.jpg
    The strips were passed through on edge with timber guides ensuring they were held steady.

    IMG-6949.jpg
    The result as per drawing in post #610.
    I will probably leave the strips as they are and let them grey, this will provide a nice non skid surface and contrast against the sole.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  21. #651
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Man, I'm pretty curious how the boards gona look with these inlays.
    Good work, good work man
    Cheers
    Max

  22. #652
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Man, I'm pretty curious how the boards gona look with these inlays.

    Good work, good work man

    Cheers

    Max
    Thanks Max. Work on the dinghy has been a bit sporadic lately but I will be getting on with those inlays soon.

    Cheers,
    Mike.



    Between the consistent surf of late and a few furniture repair jobs to replenish the dinghy kitty, work on the dinghy itself has been a little stop start.

    There has been some progress however, the epoxy on the ten ceiling battens and six sole boards has been sanded in preparation for some paint.
    IMG-7032.jpg
    Seen here gathering a bit of dust with some of the other parts that are awaiting a permanent fitting.
    The sole boards have been cut to the pattern as per the right image in post #638.
    IMG-7019.jpgIMG-7024 (1).jpg
    The boards are held in place with temporary nails, I wanted to minimize the gap of the cut and not alter any nail holes, so a Japanese pull saw was used. This has a blade just over half a millimeter thick (0.025 inch).
    Milling ribs for the four separate panels is underway. These will be 3/4 inch wide by 1/2 inch thick Kauri strips.

    The slots for the inlays will be routered in after a couple of undercoats have been applied to avoid filling them up with paint.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 03-28-2022 at 04:48 AM.
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  23. #653
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hello Mike,

    I'd like to ask about the boards you're working on.

    What have you done or what will you do to help prevent the sole boards and ceiling battens from cupping after they're in place?

    I'm asking because I have 2 small areas of ceiling boards in my runabout project's cockpit.

    Regards,
    Alan

  24. #654
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan71 View Post
    Hello Mike,

    I'd like to ask about the boards you're working on.

    What have you done or what will you do to help prevent the sole boards and ceiling battens from cupping after they're in place?

    I'm asking because I have 2 small areas of ceiling boards in my runabout project's cockpit.

    Regards,
    Alan
    Hi Alan,
    I am relying mainly on the wonderful dimensional stability of the Kauri timber. It's a privilege we have here in New Zealand to be able to use such timber.
    Add to that, two coats of epoxy, two undercoats of paint followed by two more enamel top coats, that should do the trick.
    The ceiling battens have packers shaped to the curve of the ribs, there will be two screws per rib to hold them in place.
    The sole boards will also have ribs connecting them together to form four separate removable panels.

    IMG-6949.jpg
    The above image is an example of the Kauri that I am using. The grain orientation in this particular piece runs the full length of the board offering a very stable board indeed.
    Kauri can grow to over 160 feet tall with a trunk girth up to 50 feet. They have also been dated at over 2000 years old.
    Straight, strong, naturally rot resistant and easily worked make this an exceptional boat building timber...and it's getting harder to find.

    In the case of your runabout ceiling boards, select good quality timber, protect them from the elements and fasten them securely.
    Thanks for your questions and interest Alan.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  25. #655
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A small group of woodworking students and their tutor visited me today in the workshop to check out the dinghy. Interestingly, more questions were asked about how it got into the workshop and how it would get out again. Photos were produced to solve the mystery.
    In anticipation of their visit, I loaded up the dinghy with all the various pieces that had been made, sternsheets, thwarts, sole boards, ceiling boards, bulkhead hatches, even the daggerboard.
    Then I had a thought, why not weigh it now while it's loaded up.
    So, with the block and tackles supporting each end, the dinghy was lowered down onto a 4x4 post, which sat atop a plank offcut, that had been placed on a set of bathroom scales.
    IMG-7059.jpgIMG-7061.jpg
    After a minor fore and aft adjustment, the weight was briefly taken off the tackle (but still attached just in case) and the dinghy sat there balanced on the post.
    The scales read 148.8 kilos (328lbs), I then subtracted the weight of the bow and stern support brackets 15.9 kilos (35lbs).
    This gave me a grand total of 132.9 kilos (293lbs) so far.
    A bit more trivia, the sternsheets weigh 10 kilos (22lbs) and the sole boards and ceiling battens have a combined weight of 17.1 kilos (38lbs), the sole boards take up 10 kilos (22lbs) of that.
    The balance point or center of gravity was 100mm (4") just aft of dead amidships and was located at the beamiest point.
    So this tells me that at this point in the construction process, the weight distribution fore and aft is reasonably balanced, of course hull shape and displacement has an affect but I'm not going to get to carried away with all the physics at the mo.
    This 85 kilogram (187lb) human will have some say about balance and trim as well.

    IMG-7038.jpgIMG-7062.jpg
    A couple of images with all the bits in.

    IMG-7043.jpg
    One more to use up the file.
    I haven't seen this part for a while.
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  26. #656
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Ideas of how to fasten the sole board panels securely have been swirling.
    Wanting to keep the inner sole area clear of any toggles or raised fastenings and not wanting to make recesses in the sole boards , I came up with this.

    IMG-7080.jpgIMG-7082.jpg

    The sole panel ribs will locate under a tab of half round brass ( thought it was bronze but after a clean up, I guess not) that will be secured to the top of the frame.
    The image above shows a mock up of the idea.

    IMG-7066.jpgIMG-7073.jpg

    A tab has been placed along the centre line of the dinghy on each frame. A block was added forward of the DB case so a tab could be placed here as well. This will also support the short grained shape of the sole at this point.

    IMG-7069.jpg

    The tabs have been removed and two coats of epoxy have been applied to seal the timber. The tabs will be bedded in sealant when fixed.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 04-02-2022 at 12:35 PM.
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  27. #657
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The outer edges of the sole will be secured with a modified version of these.

    IMG-7035.jpgIMG-7025 (1).jpg

    They are a collection of chrome plated brass cork borers which I thought would come in handy for something one day.
    Supplied in different sizes, the smaller diameter tube fits snugly into the next size above.

    IMG-7029.jpg

    The bigger tube will be epoxied into the frame, this will stop the panel from moving athwartships.
    The inner tubed T piece will insert into this.

    IMG-7030.jpgIMG-7031.jpg

    This is how they will work.
    The toggles will be placed near the bulkheads and outer edges of the sole too avoid being to underfoot.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  28. #658
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Nice hardware.
    And a very good idea with that half round brass. Brilliant!
    I really love it when I have laying some stuff around for a longer time, and suddenly there is a good use of it.
    By the way, what are these cork borers for? Drilling holes in cork?

    Cheers Max

  29. #659
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Nice hardware.

    And a very good idea with that half round brass. Brilliant!

    I really love it when I have laying some stuff around for a longer time, and suddenly there is a good use of it.

    By the way, what are these cork borers for? Drilling holes in cork?



    Cheers Max
    Hi Max,
    Here is an official description of a cork borer.
    It can now add sole board fastener to it's list of uses.

    A cork borer, often used in a chemistry or biology laboratory, is a metal tool for cutting a hole in a cork or rubber stopper to insert glass tubing. Cork borers usually come in a set of nested sizes along with a solid pin for pushing the removed cork (or rubber) out of the borer.

    Cheers,
    Mike.


    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  30. #660
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Very neat ideas for securing the sole boards, Mike.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
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  31. #661
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Very neat ideas for securing the sole boards, Mike.

    Ian
    Thanks Ian. Hopefully they will stand the test of time.

    The ribs have now been cut to length, scalloped at the ends that locate under the brass tabs and have a slightly angled cut at the outboard end that will rest against a small block with a matching cut, twenty pieces all up.
    In the images below the ribs have been placed in their locations and labeled to save confusion.
    IMG-7090.jpgIMG-7087.jpg

    Lines marking the screw locations have been drawn across the boards.
    The plan is to glue and screw each of the ribs into their respective places creating four three board panels.
    The screws are only 3/4" and though they have a full thread, combining them with the glue will create a more solid sole under foot.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  32. #662
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland
    Posts
    171

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hello Mike,

    Such a finely detailed little boat!

    I hope coming up with these schemes of just how to do things gives YOU as much pleasure as seeing them gives ME!!

    Regards,
    Alan

  33. #663
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    888

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan71 View Post
    Hello Mike,

    Such a finely detailed little boat!

    I hope coming up with these schemes of just how to do things gives YOU as much pleasure as seeing them gives ME!!

    Regards,
    Alan
    Thanks Alan.
    I certainly get a kick out of figuring out how to do things with the materials I have at hand.
    The dinghy has only cost me about a $1000 to get it to this stage, mainly due to using the materials I have collected over the years.
    Most of the ply, paint, epoxy, cloth, fasteners, brushes, sandpaper etc has been bought specifically for the job but the volumes have been small...so far.

    Ideas are now swirling regarding a removable ceiling batten panel, more for ease of maintenance than anything but it would also get rid of all those screw holes in the ribs...plus it would lighten the boat if I found myself in a competitive situation.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 04-05-2022 at 08:27 PM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  34. #664
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Schleswig Holstein Germany
    Posts
    1,053

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Let it swirl Mike.
    I´m looking forward what will emerge

    Cheers
    Max

  35. #665
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Let it swirl Mike.
    I´m looking forward what will emerge

    Cheers
    Max
    Those ideas will have to swirl in the dark corners for a little while longer Max, as the job of fixing the sole boards to the ribs required my full attention.
    The tolerances for getting everything right was rather fine.
    I needed clearance between the panel ribs and hull frames for epoxy and paint coatings but not so much that it would allow excessive for and aft movement.

    IMG-7098.jpgIMG-7116.jpg

    The left image shows the ribs being set up in their positions. There is an opposing set of ribs on each panel that will lock it in place fore and aft.
    The right image shows the temporary spacers that will sit between the rib and frame.
    While the ribs were set, small blocks were placed at the outboard end of two ribs from each panel . These would help steady the panels in position and stop athwartship movement.

    IMG-7107.jpgIMG-7114.jpg

    The sole boards were held in place using locating pins to hold them steady while the screws were set.
    The right image shows the inboard end of the panel rib locked under the brass strip.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 04-09-2022 at 03:59 PM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

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