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Thread: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

  1. #981
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Mike:
    I've not commented for a while, but feel compelled to weigh in now. In many kinds of work I've tried to teach that mastery of craft is not always flawless execution. Real mastery is mostly that (we live in hope) , but, harder to teach (or even demonstrate) is how one deals with less-than-flawless execution, or even (gasp) mistakes. Your remediation of an error made in construction (many years ago, by some unknown builder) is a wonderful example of that. Nice work!! Hoisting a glass in your general direction...
    Carry on
    Brian

  2. #982
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Mike:
    I've not commented for a while, but feel compelled to weigh in now. In many kinds of work I've tried to teach that mastery of craft is not always flawless execution. Real mastery is mostly that (we live in hope) , but, harder to teach (or even demonstrate) is how one deals with less-than-flawless execution, or even (gasp) mistakes. Your remediation of an error made in construction (many years ago, by some unknown builder) is a wonderful example of that. Nice work!! Hoisting a glass in your general direction...
    Carry on
    Brian
    Thank you Brian for the commendation.
    Hoisting a glass right back at you.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  3. #983
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hello Mike,

    For many, many years I was part of the building of very special new houses that hopefully would become special homes for a family.
    I'd often sat at my drawing board and thought about what it took to accomplish this.
    I distilled the efforts down to these...Vision, Skill, Sequence, Momentum.

    You have Mastered this!

    What lovely work you do!
    You continue to be a wonderful inspiration for me as I try to build a boat.
    Thank You!

    Regards,
    Alan
    Last edited by Alan71; 12-24-2022 at 02:51 PM.

  4. #984
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan71 View Post
    For many, many years I was part of the building of very special new houses that hopefully would become special homes for a family.
    I'd often sit at my drawing board and think about what it took to accomplish this.
    I distilled the efforts down to these...Vision, Skill, Sequence, Momentum.
    Not to hijack Mike’s thread displaying the results of such craftsmanship, but I want to say thank you to Alan for those words summarizing what I strive for and occasionally experience in a building project but have never been able to put into words. The inspiration/vision for what to build, the learning of skills to accomplish it, the deep understanding of parts and their relationship that dictates the sequence, and thrill and energy of the project when it picks up momentum (and the waiting and re-kindling that we do when the momentum fades).

    Thanks Alan for those four words and if you ever want to start a thread to say more about your thoughts on the matter, I for one would love to read it.

    -Neil
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  5. #985
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan71 View Post
    Hello Mike,

    For many, many years I was part of the building of very special new houses that hopefully would become special homes for a family.
    I'd often sit at my drawing board and think about what it took to accomplish this.
    I distilled the efforts down to these...Vision, Skill, Sequence, Momentum.

    You have Mastered this!

    What lovely work you do!
    You continue to be a wonderful inspiration for me as I try to build a boat.
    Thank You!

    Regards,
    Alan
    Thank you very much Alan.
    Knowing that these posts have inspired you gives me a great sense of satisfaction.
    Those four words describe the creative and building process wonderfully well.
    I will take the compliment and run with it.
    Thanks again.

    Merry Christmas.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  6. #986
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilMB View Post
    Not to hijack Mike’s thread displaying the results of such craftsmanship, but I want to say thank you to Alan for those words summarizing what I strive for and occasionally experience in a building project but have never been able to put into words. The inspiration/vision for what to build, the learning of skills to accomplish it, the deep understanding of parts and their relationship that dictates the sequence, and thrill and energy of the project when it picks up momentum (and the waiting and re-kindling that we do when the momentum fades).

    Thanks Alan for those four words and if you ever want to start a thread to say more about your thoughts on the matter, I for one would love to read it.

    -Neil
    Hi Neil,
    I agree with you.
    Thanks for adding the extra details.
    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  7. #987
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    A couple of before and after images indicating what I was trying to achieve.
    The straight edge is plum in both cases and about the same distance back from the stem, with the dinghy level athwartships.

    IMG-8647.jpgIMG-8738.jpg

    The strakes in the left image almost have tumblehome, while those in the right now show a shallow flair, which matches the port side.
    One more small length to fit a little further aft to blend everything in and then it's on to fairing the complete hull.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  8. #988
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Fourth and final strake fitted and faired.
    The next task will be to fair the bottom edge of each strake to create a proportional run with the adjacent strakes.

    IMG-8747.jpgIMG-8754.jpgIMG-8752.jpg

    I planed the new strakes level with the bottom of the original ones but when I hung the dinghy right way up and stood back to have a squizz, well, lets just say there are a few kinks to iron out.
    But that will have to wait until next year, off surf tripping into 2023.

    Happy New Year everyone.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  9. #989
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hi Mike
    I wouldn΄t have put that much effort in this planking issue, but gladly you did.
    It comes out very nicely, and I really understand why you did it.
    Happy New Year
    Max

  10. #990
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Hi Mike
    I wouldn΄t have put that much effort in this planking issue, but gladly you did.
    It comes out very nicely, and I really understand why you did it.
    Happy New Year
    Max
    Hi Max,
    Thanks Max.
    The photos don’t really highlight the deformation very well.My thoughts were that when the hull was painted with the Dutch white, the shadow lines of the strake edges would draw the eye to the flat spot. Maybe it’s all in my head but the jobs done now so no problem
    Happy New Year.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  11. #991
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Painstaking is the word, along with skill, experience, and the right gear. Well done, Mike!
    Happy New Year!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #992
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Painstaking is the word, along with skill, experience, and the right gear. Well done, Mike!
    Happy New Year!
    Ian
    Thank you, Ian and a Happy New Year to you too.

    Just back from a surf trip to Waihi beach.

    Speaking of having the right gear, trying to keep up with Forum news and views on a small I-phone using a pair of reading glasses with a missing temple piece is not ideal.
    Note to self, pack spare reading glasses... and do not sit on them.

    Have a great trip, Ian.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  13. #993
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Back into it today. Don't go back to work until the 16th Jan and it looks like rain until then, so it's hull fairing time.
    The dinghy is now resting on it's deck upon three office chair seats (they had broken back rests and were being discarded).
    These set the dinghy at a comfortable working level as they have a height adjustment lever.

    IMG-8771.jpg

    They also allow the dinghy to be moved from side to side in a somewhat narrow space, allowing a bit more area along each side to work and be able to stand back a bit to cast the eye.

    First job was to fair the stem into the keel.
    This had not been done when the stem was originally planted on.

    IMG-8786.jpgIMG-8795.jpg

    The bottom edge was planed flush with the keel and the curve then faired using a thin batten to highlight the hollows and bumps.
    A half round brass/bronze strip will eventually be screwed along the leading edge of the stem running into a strap or two half rounds along the keel.

    These rubbing battens will be removed completely, mainly to reduce drag, I know, I know, it's not that much but it's drag just the same.

    IMG-8799.jpg

    The bunks will be adjusted on the trailer to make up for the lack of skids. Will probably use some sort of high grade plastic material often referred to by four letters for a slip n slide surface.
    Beach rollers will take care of abrasive situations, that or an anchor buddy type arrangement.

    I bought this No.75 Stanley bull nosed rabbet plane a while ago, especially for the job of cleaning up the strake edges.

    IMG-8772.jpg

    It is only 4" long, so can actually get into the shallower concave curves.
    They are not the easiest of planes to use but as long as it is sharp and the depth of cut is adjusted to the task, then it will do the job.
    Some folk add a wooden handle to take the load off the palm of the hand and for better control.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  14. #994
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The rubbing strips disappeared today.
    A multitool, grinder and random orbital took care of that.

    IMG-8805.jpgIMG-8812.jpg

    That butchered blue plastic funnel is attached to the vacuum and sucks away most of the dust from the grinder.

    Once that was completed I set about marking out a taper on the aft section of the keel.
    It's a bit chunky and this reshaping will help create a better flow onto the rudder foil.

    IMG-8814.jpgIMG-8815 (1).jpgIMG-8816.jpg

    A tapered scallop will be carved along the bottom to blend it all in...tomorrows job, I'm off to get a few 36 grit sanding discs.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  15. #995
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    The initial idea was to scallop base of the skeg.
    This did not appeal however as it seemed to defeat the purpose of a tapered run aft for a clean run onto the rudder foil.
    A multitool soon took care of that.
    I had inserted long SS screws into the skeg from inside the boat before completion to add rigidity and strength.

    IMG-8929.jpgIMG-8936.jpg
    IMG-8938.jpg

    The taper begins about 3 feet from the stern, running from 45mm (1- 3/4") wide to 18mm (11/16") at the transom. This tapered part of the skeg hangs beyond the aft roller on the trailer.
    An epoxy fillet will run along the joint with the hog timber.
    A brass half round will cover the end of the skeg finishing flush with the base of the transom and run about a foot along the skeg. Another half round will adorn the leading edge of the stem.
    I'm looking at placing a Kwila timber, sometimes called Merbau along the length of the keel as a sacrificial piece. Kwila is a tropical hardwood which is strong, durable and stable.

    Low areas on the hull and hollows along the strake edges are being marked out for a bit of fairing treatment with 407/epoxy.

    IMG-8943.jpg
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  16. #996
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Looking good, Mike - always something interesting to ponder . I’m going to shamelessly copy your butchered-funnel dust-hoover . Simple and brilliant.
    You can never have too many clamps
    —————————————————————————————-
    “…the builder must find a proper place to make a full-sized drawing of the plan marked "lines." It is this stage of building that is so often neglected, and this is the most common cause of trouble later on.” - Howard I. Chappelle, Boatbuilding. Introduction, p.19. My emphasis.

  17. #997
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1N View Post
    Looking good, Mike - always something interesting to ponder . I’m going to shamelessly copy your butchered-funnel dust-hoover . Simple and brilliant.
    Thanks ,Alex.

    The windows in my workshop are mainly along one wall, meaning that the cross flow of ventilation is limited.
    I limit the use of the grinder in the workshop because of this, hence the funnel/vac setup.
    It is only really effective on the smaller jobs but it does work.

    Fans mounted off the ceiling at one end of the shop plus a couple on stands strategically placed down the shop help direct dust toward the door and windows on those certain occasions.
    Dust collection systems are permanently set up on the machines and the hand held tools use the portable vac.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  18. #998
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Hello Mike, Thanks for your reply, you are well set up. I had been patting myself on the back that I‘d got the belt sander on wheels and working - only to be reminded when plugging it in that I had been neglecting the installation of the permanent side of my dust extraction ‘system’. Your comments reinforce the need to get that sorted. I got a big box o’ bits a while ago to replace the concertina-piped parts of said permanent system with smooth less-turbulence-creating pipes, but that stalled with more exciting things such as getting to a point where I could actually do some building, er, distracting me. Part of the problem is that the shed doors roll back over the ceiling, thus making the free run of pipes rather more restricted - so the concertina pipes are still snaking inconveniently across the floor. I need to get some 100 mm PVC drainage pipe and fittings too: the clear plastic ones in the big box are in short lengths and only really affordable for short runs near bends. Time to get the tape measure, pencil and paper out and sort this one out once and for all. The small air filter up near the ceiling is really only of limited use, and I’m beginning to think that the 2hp extractor may not have enough oomph for the length of runs required, even with blast gates. What price healthy lungs, eh? Thread drift off.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps
    —————————————————————————————-
    “…the builder must find a proper place to make a full-sized drawing of the plan marked "lines." It is this stage of building that is so often neglected, and this is the most common cause of trouble later on.” - Howard I. Chappelle, Boatbuilding. Introduction, p.19. My emphasis.

  19. #999
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1N View Post
    Hello Mike, Thanks for your reply, you are well set up. I had been patting myself on the back that I‘d got the belt sander on wheels and working - only to be reminded when plugging it in that I had been neglecting the installation of the permanent side of my dust extraction ‘system’. Your comments reinforce the need to get that sorted. I got a big box o’ bits a while ago to replace the concertina-piped parts of said permanent system with smooth less-turbulence-creating pipes, but that stalled with more exciting things such as getting to a point where I could actually do some building, er, distracting me. Part of the problem is that the shed doors roll back over the ceiling, thus making the free run of pipes rather more restricted - so the concertina pipes are still snaking inconveniently across the floor. I need to get some 100 mm PVC drainage pipe and fittings too: the clear plastic ones in the big box are in short lengths and only really affordable for short runs near bends. Time to get the tape measure, pencil and paper out and sort this one out once and for all. The small air filter up near the ceiling is really only of limited use, and I’m beginning to think that the 2hp extractor may not have enough oomph for the length of runs required, even with blast gates. What price healthy lungs, eh? Thread drift off.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Hi Alex,

    I have not permanently set up my workshop extraction systems (to walls or ceiling) because I was never sure how long I would be here.
    They are all stand alone units (4) in close proximity to the machines allowing for short flexible hoses.
    This allows the option of moving the work stations and reconfiguring the shop if new equipment is obtained or the work area needs to be clearer.
    On the twin bag 3 HP extractor there is a long flexible hose connected with a Y junction and gate in line with the jointer. This has various uses, vacuuming the floor, portable thicknesser chip extraction plus added extraction on the table saw.
    Different systems for different situations.
    You'll figure it out I'm sure. Gruntier the better.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 01-12-2023 at 04:33 PM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  20. #1000
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Survived Ok then , no need to turn that boat right way up so as to float through the storms?

  21. #1001
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Survived Ok then , no need to turn that boat right way up so as to float through the storms?
    By the time it reached here...well... a bit of a fizzer really, all hype, no grunt for the most part...the nastiest period lasted about 3 hours, wouldn't have wanted to be out then.

    Janet took a few litres of rain on board, surf was up for a day, a close proximity wind swell with an 8 second peak count which lacked punch.

    So we live to fight another day, plus I live on a hill.

    Looks pretty good for the Tall Ships Regatta tomorrow.
    Last edited by Mike1902; 01-12-2023 at 09:06 PM.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  22. #1002
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Persisted down here again in Wetland. We'll mooch out tommorrow( its raining again now) to watch some boats.

  23. #1003
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Persisted down here again in Wetland. We'll mooch out tommorrow( its raining again now) to watch some boats.
    Not tempted to defend the title this year then.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  24. #1004
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Fairing the hull is well underway.
    There are a few humps and hollows to contend with, understandably so on a 50 year old hull with strakes made from 4mm (3/16") plywood.
    The hull is a lot stiffer now with the bulkheads, partitions, two extra frames plus fillets along each battened seam.
    From what I have found, the hollows are situated between some of the old frame stations.

    IMG-8956.jpgIMG-8959.jpg

    I made up two Kauri fairing battens with handles, one at 10"x 1/8" and the other at 20"x 3/16" long with 60 grit (2 3/4" wide) adhesive backed sand paper attached.
    Three extra blocks of various shapes and sizes completed the tools needed.

    After marking the low spots with a pencil, these were then brush primed ( scrubbed almost) with epoxy and left while I mixed up the 407/epoxy.
    Any excess epoxy was then removed from the surface with a paper towel before the filler mix was applied with a wide drywall jointing knife.

    IMG-8963.jpgIMG-8965.jpg

    I'm alternating between the port and starboard sides which allows the mix to cure for a little longer, around 24-48 hours.
    I first remove the high spots with the long block being careful not to over do it, this is then followed by one of the fairing battens to blend it all in.
    The vac is handy to continually remove the sanded filler from the paper and keep dust to a minimum.

    IMG-8960.jpg

    The low spots are highlighted after the first sanding, these are then sanded to key in and marked for the second coat.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  25. #1005
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Fairing coming along nicely, in the mathematical sense . And in the general one .

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Hi Alex,

    I have not permanently set up my workshop extraction systems (to walls or ceiling) because I was never sure how long I would be here.
    They are all stand alone units (4) in close proximity to the machines allowing for short flexible hoses.
    This allows the option of moving the work stations and reconfiguring the shop if new equipment is obtained or the work area needs to be clearer.
    On the twin bag 3 HP extractor there is a long flexible hose connected with a Y junction and gate in line with the jointer. This has various uses, vacuuming the floor, portable thicknesser chip extraction plus added extraction on the table saw.
    Different systems for different situations.
    You'll figure it out I'm sure. Gruntier the better.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Thanks for the info. Food for thought, especially said grunt.
    You can never have too many clamps
    —————————————————————————————-
    “…the builder must find a proper place to make a full-sized drawing of the plan marked "lines." It is this stage of building that is so often neglected, and this is the most common cause of trouble later on.” - Howard I. Chappelle, Boatbuilding. Introduction, p.19. My emphasis.

  26. #1006
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    I'm going to have a marked waterline.
    Just got to figure out where it is exactly.

    IMG-8981.jpg

    Trialing the laser level.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  27. #1007
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    I'm going to have a marked waterline.
    Just got to figure out where it is exactly.

    IMG-8981.jpg

    Trialing the laser level.
    I would leave it until she is painted. Then dunk her with sandbags replicating the live ballast and mark where the water stops.
    Then haul her back out and join the dots with your laser level.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  28. #1008
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I would leave it until she is painted. Then dunk her with sandbags replicating the live ballast and mark where the water stops.
    Then haul her back out and join the dots with your laser level.
    Thanks for the input Nick.
    Your idea would be a good practical solution...but...here are the reasons why that will probably not happen.

    My workshop is situated on a hill, accessible only by steps and then through a single door 810mm ( 2'8") wide.
    Once the boat leaves the shop it will not be coming back so I would like to complete as much as possible while it's there.
    Any following work, maintenance and rigging set up will have to be managed some distance from the shop under an open carport.
    Sure painting the bottom of a boat outside is no biggie but the bottom is going to be an epoxy/graphite finish ( I can hear the groans from here.)
    Therefore a controlled environment is preferred plus all the gear is there to finish the job.

    The photos in the OP show a waterline, how accurate , I don't know but will use that as a guide.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  29. #1009
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Looking at Mikes work up to this point I reckon he will have it pretty close. I don’t want to jinx you mike but probably spot on.
    Any adjustments can be made as you said Nick.
    she’s looking lovely!!

    steve

  30. #1010
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    My initial thought when I saw the wet - almost black, I dare say that it might have been the light? - was, “He’s going to tar and feather her!”. Now you’ve actually confessed that you’re going to tar (and maybe feather) her! I must be prescient or sunnink… . Sorry, couldn’t resist.

    Given all the conniptions you’ll be going through it would be tricky to do all the lasering and coating, etc., on the hard…

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 01-17-2023 at 08:51 PM. Reason: Removed a word
    You can never have too many clamps
    —————————————————————————————-
    “…the builder must find a proper place to make a full-sized drawing of the plan marked "lines." It is this stage of building that is so often neglected, and this is the most common cause of trouble later on.” - Howard I. Chappelle, Boatbuilding. Introduction, p.19. My emphasis.

  31. #1011
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Geftb View Post
    Looking at Mikes work up to this point I reckon he will have it pretty close. I don’t want to jinx you mike but probably spot on.
    Any adjustments can be made as you said Nick.
    she’s looking lovely!!

    steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1N View Post
    My initial thought when I saw the wet - almost black, I dare say that it might have been the light? - was, “He’s going to tar and feather her!”. Now you’ve actually confessed that you’re going to tar (and maybe feather) her! I must be prescient or sunnink… . Sorry, couldn’t resist.

    Given all the conniptions you’ll be going through it would be tricky to do all the lasering and coating, etc., on the hard…

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Please excuse the delayed reply gentlemen but busy work/life stuff and a lack of content/progress to accompany said reply are the excuses.

    Thanks Steve, no worries about the jinxing, there is something to be said about creating your own luck.

    Spooky Alex, psychic readings are lucrative.

    Cheers guys.


    The fairing of the hull is almost compete.
    The were a number of hollow sections along the strakes between the old rib stations.
    These areas, though shallow, did require a bit of fill to take out the waviness along the run.

    I am now deciding whether to remove the aft section of the skeg or not.
    It stands about 4" at the aft end of the keel.

    IMG-8989.jpgIMG-8988.jpg

    If it stays it will help with tracking when rowing plus it will help lessen the leeway when on the wind.
    If it goes it will improve tacking speed (not a lot of rocker going on) and lessen the disrupted water flow to the upper rudder area.
    When rowing, the rudder would be engaged to some degree, so that would aid the tracking instead of a full skeg.
    Also, this part of the boat extends beyond the trailer bed.
    Thoughts welcomed.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  32. #1012
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Port Stephens
    Posts
    25,793

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    On boats that'll be beached and dragged, at all, skegs are just a nuisance. A sacrificial skeg can be worth having if dragging over rocks or concrete, of course. Performance wise, I haven't found that a skeg makes much difference.

    Why have a painted waterline? On a boat that's to be antifouled it's worth having a border to guide the antifouling but on a boat that doesn't stay in the water, I wonder what the purpose is?
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  33. #1013
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    On boats that'll be beached and dragged, at all, skegs are just a nuisance. A sacrificial skeg can be worth having if dragging over rocks or concrete, of course. Performance wise, I haven't found that a skeg makes much difference.

    Why have a painted waterline? On a boat that's to be antifouled it's worth having a border to guide the antifouling but on a boat that doesn't stay in the water, I wonder what the purpose is?
    The skeg in this case is mainly a structural element, offers that extra stiffness along the keel for trailering plus helps with the usual loading dispersion while under sail I suppose.
    I'm liking the idea of that cut away section more and more.
    I plan to have a couple or three fenders on board for extra flotation and to act as beach rollers when needed.

    The waterline will be signified by the epoxy/graphite finish below and the painted topsides.
    Just a slippery finish that is easy to repair.
    It will match the dagger board and rudder too, an underwater ensemble as it were.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

  34. #1014
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Port Stephens
    Posts
    25,793

    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Yes, by skeg I meant that rear fin-like bit that you intend to remove. I'd also remove it.
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  35. #1015
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    Default Re: The believed abstraction of a 12 foot clinker dinghy.

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    Yes, by skeg I meant that rear fin-like bit that you intend to remove. I'd also remove it.
    Job done.

    IMG-8992.jpgIMG-8994.jpg

    Used one of the best tools ever invented to do the business.
    There were a couple of stainless fixings to get through.
    Followed with a 36 grit disc on the 4" grinder and finished with a sanding block.

    The support blocks for the DB case have had their edges rounded and a small radius fillet has been run along the length of the keel.

    IMG-8996.jpg
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    Whatever floats your boat.

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