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Thread: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

  1. #1
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    Default 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Good afternoon all, hope everyone was having a good day up until now.

    You may have seen on the Wooden Boat websites' "Free Boats" section, a 52' Robert Beebe disigned Passagemaker. The boat, that has been sitting on the hard since 2009 after the passing of her previous owner, has fallen to some disrepair. The hull had dried out, the deck has plenty of soft spots, the interior has some rot. From what I can tell online, this boat has quite a following. It's mentioned on several forums and articles admiring its design and beauty, yet there it sits. Well folks, it's time has come. I have taken over ownership of the 52' beauty, I've had Scarano Boat Builders caulk the seams, bottom paint, and next week they will launch her.

    It's all gone great so far, I've been taking trips out and doing work where work can be done. Cleaning, sorting, throwing out, testing, making lists. I've gotten the engine running with the advice of Mike and Eric at Scaranos, (nothing but excellent things to say about them) and now I do believe she is ready to be launched, swelled, and sent underway for the first time in 11 years.

    Here's the catch, I've never done so much as canoeing. Sure, I've been sailing in a Lightning, and I've been out on a good number of rowboats with outboards, but never been at the helm of a boat such as this. So, with that being said, once she's in the water, and swelled up, I'll be taking her South, down the Hudson, and along the coast, to Brooklin, Maine.

    I have a good idea of what direction South is, and plenty of books on navigation that I've been pouring through. I have served in the Navy, so that gives me some more ship experience, but all in all you can call me a Greenhorn. Or, more aptly, a Tinhorn, Greenhorn is the name of the boat.

    What I'm asking is for absolutely any help whatsoever on my trip that I plan to be starting within the next 2 weeks. Any checklists before I go, tips, places to go/avoid, anything. I have plenty of life jackets, a horn, flares, whistles, 2 lifeboats, diesel cans, spare filters, extra coolant/oils, should have plenty of money, I definitely have enough food, I have all the tools, manuals, books, ropes, anchors, whatever. That's all good and fun BUT I DONT KNOW HOW TO USE IT ALL.

    I plan on taking a week or more to go from Albany, NY to Brooklin, ME by going south through the Hudson, north of Long Island, through CT, and along the coast the rest of the way. I have all my charts, a radio, a sonar, no radar but I plan to get one. I think the trip itself won't be the challenge, it will be the restoration.

    I plan on restoring it back to what it was, with whisker poles and flopper stoppers, completely replace the deck, repair some rot on two ribs, replace the floor, rebuild the generator. This is a 52' learning experience. I'm a carpenter by trade and I have a good understanding of remodeling work with houses, I'm sure a lot of the same techniques apply. I'll be documenting everything with video and putting it online to show as I go, I'll update when I start doing that.

    I know that's a big post, I know this is a big undertaking, I appreciate any help you have to offer.

    Thank you, Tinhorn

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Welcome to the Forum!
    That's a lot of boat for a beginner to be taking on a voyage like that.
    Will you be taking anyone with you? Someone to relieve you at the helm, act as a lookout, help with docking, etc.? It would be a very good idea.
    It will take a while just to learn the way the boat behaves. Turning radius, stopping distance, windage and things like that. Getting in and out of marinas will be a huge challenge and filled with peril for a beginner.
    I, like you, know nothing about operating a boat of that size. I'd be scared silly.

    When you had the professional work done, did you have a survey done? The boat might look OK and still have hidden surprises.
    I don't mean to be a Debbie-downer, just injecting some reality.

    I sincerely wish you a successful voyage.
    We'd all love to see some pictures.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    That is quite a big first bite to take.
    I wish you the best of luck on the voyage and with the restoration.
    I will be following along from here.

    Is this the one?

    Last edited by timo4352; 08-08-2020 at 05:20 PM.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Welcome to the forum!

    I have a 52' sailboat. I've sailed since I was 3 (60+ years ago). While I admire your spirit, I am a bit concerned - both for you & for others on the water.

    Have you taken any of the (free) power squadron courses on rules of the road, navigation, etc?

    If you've never been out in anything more than a lightning or some small outboards, you are doing the equivalent of driving an 80K lb tractor trailer from Buffalo to LA after only running a garden tractor some years ago. Or - if you've ever skied, did you head down an expert trail the first time after you rode up the chairlift? A boat of this size takes time to get going, even more time to stop & not only will she get blown around by the wind, but she'll be moved by currents & tides as well. Do you know how to dock? Have fenders & docklines? Know how to set them up? How to turn (it's not like a car)? Do you have proper anchoring gear for when you have to stop (note I said "when you have to", "not when you want to")? Proper radio gear? Do you know how to use it? Are the nav lights all working properly? Do you have radar for when you're in fog that hides the bow (yes - fog where you can see less than 50 ft. is common in Maine). Are your engines all set to run 8 hours a day for 2 weeks? Can you fix them when they stop? Do you have tools & spare parts? You can't pull off to the side of the road & call a mechanic. Do you have detailed charts for every mile of the trip? That's a lot of charts. Do you have a GPS or a chartplotter? If not, how will you know where you are? Remember, 10 ft out of a channel means running aground.

    It may be that you have all this (& lots more I didn't go into) squared away - and if you do, have a great trip. If not - you need to do some serious research. I say this not to be a jerk, to to try & help you stay alive (that's not an exaggeration).

    The first time you take her out you need at least 2 other people with you - preferably folks with some experience. Taking off on a trip to Brooklin (which will be more like a 2 week trip - even if you have no problems) without a few weeks of motoring about locally is absolutely asking for trouble.

    Even with 60 years of experience, taking my boat out singlehanded & even more, bringing her back to a doc singlehanded is not for the faint of heart.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Tinhorn, I love your "jump in with both feet" attitude and hope you have nothing but the finest of luck. You said you were ex-Navy so you obviously have some boat knowledge, but other than sailing Lightnings you don't mention what your actual experience is. I've never tackled a project like yours, so take any comments for exactly what they're worth: the electrons on your screen. I have, however done numerous deliveries in the 200-800 mile range. That said, I would strongly advise you get one or two knowledgeable folks to accompany you on your delivery. Look for larger powerboat experience, wooden boat knowledge and engine/electrical background. It helps if they like the same kind of beer you do. Be patient. Timelines are like battle plans. No plan survives the first encounter. Along with your accompanying crew set up shoreside contacts who might be willing to run you parts if you need them. With luck you won't need that option, but it's nice to have it in place beforehand. Document everything. Your route, your friends accompanying you, your planned route, your possible bolt-holes. Give that info to your shore support team. If you have the tech, keep a running report on this forum, not just because we're all really snoopy and jealous of your project (I am, at least), but because you might find some helpful info in a time of need. And lastly, enjoy ​your trip!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    0713200832e_HDR.jpg0728201618a_HDR.jpg0728201610.jpg

    Hello again, thank you for the replies.

    Yes, timo4352, that's the one.
    Rich Jones, I have nobody to go with. I'd prefer to go by myself. I believe I should take her out a time or two while she swells before I head out, and practice my docking skills, along with manuvering and so on. I did not get a survey done, I did do a full tour of the boat and Scaranos was very transparent as to the work it needs and the work it has had done.

    Garret, I haven't taken the courses but I do have the books. I think it would be best for me to take it out a time or two before I get underway. I have my fenders, mooring lines are set, radio works, I've got a good idea of how to use it, nav lights and anchor equiptment will be tested on my test run. I will be religiously checking my weather and course, avoiding all days of bad weather all together. I habe all the spare parts and tools I need, I have any repair book i need. I do not have charts all the way, I should get those, possibly as I go. Not sure where to get those really. As far as GPS the best I have is a navigation app on my phone. I plan on sticking right close to the coast the whole way. I'll see if I can get a small crew for the first couple trips out. You're all invited if you'd like to come along, greenhorns need not apply.

    Hugh MacD, thank you sir for your kind words. Those are all excellent ideas, while I am one for a strong sense of adventure, there is a point of absurdity I don't wish to cross, maybe just brush by. I'll be as careful as I can, and as diligent as I can with documenting my progress aboard the Greenhorn. I'll be posting on this forum a lot more often, and hopefully I can get some film coverage for YouTube or social media.

    Thank you all, Tinhorn

  7. #7
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Have fun !
    "Little Bear" 1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    " Fela " 1985 Glen L15 - 1977 Johnson 15 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  8. #8
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Looks like a great project! Something to consider is seeing if you can set up a soaker hose on deck or something to get the wood above the waterline to swell. When you get into weather you may find you have seepage from the topsides. As far as charts, I'm assuming you have this link: https://www.charts.noaa.gov/ChartCatalog/MapSelect.html and have downloaded the appropriate charts? If you can take a laptop you can probably interface the phone GPS and overlay it on the NOAA charts, or just display your Navionics (or whichever) on the laptop so it's a bit bigger display.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Buy a $700 fish finder that has built in charts. Handy for all sorts of things. But, I would definitely bring a friend or two a
    while you practice things like docking. It can be interesting handling and maneuvering a single screw vessel. It takes awhile to figure out and a 50 footer isn’t going to be terribly forgiving.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Also, buy the paper charts, lay out your intended course including fuel burn and intended way points. Well underway continue to plot positions. It's essential for if/when GPS goes out. Taking out an old boat without reliable electrical systems and relying only on digital charts is foolish, hell taking out a state of the art boat and only relying on digital systems is also silly. Use both the redundancy is well worth it.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    It does sound like a great trip & I'm really not trying to be negative - just realistic.

    Dunno what phone app you have, but what happens if you lose your phone? Dick's Sporting goods or the like can sell you a $75 portable GPS that will at least allow you to plot your position on a paper chart. (& I agree with the above that you really need them). Lots of places to buy them online: https://www.google.com/search?client...4dUDCAs&uact=5

    MapTech makes booklets (large booklets) of charts that cover an area. They can be less expensive.

    "Sticking close to the coast" sounds good - but it's also the most dangerous - as that's where the rocks, wrecks, and shallows are. Remember - you cannot see the bottom! A fishfinder will help some, but you really need to know exactly where you are & what you're heading into.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  12. #12
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Congratulations on taking the plunge. Among many things that come to mind, one that hasnít been mentioned yet is fuel. It is rather common in boats that have sat for long periods of time to get algae or other contaminants in the tanks. Survey and test cruises in calm waters wonít show any issues, but when people encounter rougher conditions, the fuel gets stirred up and end up clogging the filters and starving the engine of diesel. So I would 1. make sure you have plenty of spare fuel filters. 2. Practice changing and bleeding at the dock rather than when you need to do it somewhere strange in a pitching and rolling boat.

    I also would recommend looking at OpenCPN with downloaded NOAA charts. If you have a laptop, the GPS pucks are cheap and this will allow you good charting for your whole trip on a screen large enough to see. active Captain is also worth looking into for general marina and anchorage info.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Man, the more I think about this the more I realize it's a bad idea to do this solo with little experience, especially if you are running a boat of questionable condition. It makes it impossible to run at night, or to do hourly engine room checks. Basically the entire presumption assumes nothing will go wrong, and in my experience it always does. The new England coast can be very tricky to navigate up, and with a single person running inshore you are basically limited to daylight hours, that means that by necessity you will have to put into a variety of less than ideal ports that require very tight ship handling. I personally wouldn't want to be picking up a mooring in Nantucket single handed, or for that matter trying to edge my way into a place like horseshoe cove in Maine. A lot of those harbors are very tight, and very full of expensive bumpers.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    What you are proposing borders on insanity. From sailing a lighting to piloting a 52 footer? A navigation APP on your phone? You will be a danger to yourself and everyone else
    you come within a dozen boatlengths of.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Congratulations.
    How about having it hauled to Maine? It's not that expensive. Then cut your teeth in home waters while restoring.
    Your proposed trip has too many watch-outs to list here. I admire your "go for it!" attitude, but this is not something with which to experiment, IMHO.
    If you insist on water route, get a survey, hire a licensed captain, if you can find one willing, to make the delivery while you help and learn. This sounds like a Farley Mowat story in the making.
    The sea is unforgiving, your vessel is an unknown entity, it will probably cost more to motor than haul, and you have no experience. I'm with willin woodworks (and others) on this.
    Stay safe.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    " I'm a carpenter by trade and I have a good understanding of remodeling work with houses, I'm sure a lot of the same techniques apply. "
    I assure you they do not.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Again, thank you all for your replies.

    High MacD, thank you for the link, I didnt have it but now I do. As far as topside washdown hose I do have a couple, fore and aft, that I can use for that purpose.

    2dogsnight, Thank you! I'll keep you posted! I have a launch date for Monday, August 17th, 2020.

    Jsjpd1, I think based on what everyone is saying I'll be buying a good GPS. The fish finder/plotters I looked at were less than impressive. I have the fish finder already, might as well spend good money on just a GPS.

    Garret, thank you very much sir for your advice, I truly appreciate it. I'll be buying the rest of the booklets for my course as well as getting my hands on a good GPS, any models you recommend? I have a Cabelas near me, Dick's sporting goods didn't have anything. Also, I was raised watching Red Green, I've got plenty of duct tape just in case.

    SailAR, Eric Everson at Scarano Boat Builders did mention that to me. I have plenty of spare filters, I'll be practicing changing them out while I'm on calm waters in the Hudson. Thank you for those recommendations, I'll take a good look at them all.

    Pelirrojo, thank you for your advice, I appreciate your honesty. I think that would be best for me being not the most experienced to only operate during daylight, early to rise, early to bed. As much as I like Bob Seger, I will not be working on my night moves.

    DoctorB, thank you for your advice. I was looking into having it hauled to Buffalo, NY, where I am now, it was too large for any shipping company to consider. Then I thought I might have it towed through the Erie Canal, they charge 10k a day, its a 10 day round trip. Then, when I asked a captain what he would charge to take it to Maine with me, he wanted 20k. I wish I could haul it, but unfortunately I'll just have to have a grand ol time taking it myself.


    Again, thank you all for replying, it's given me a lot to think about. Today I'll be shopping for a GPS, and ordering my paper charts online. While I'm not in a time crunch, I do wonder exactly how much it will cost in fuel. I figured 2k in fuel, but not sure the best way to figure my burn rate. It's a CAT 3304, I have a full capacity of 1,214 gallons. The vessel weighs 36,000 pounds, 52' long, 16.5' abeam, not sure what else you base fuel burn off of. Is $2,000 enough?

    Thank you, Tinhorn

  18. #18
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Hello. And welcome to the forum.

    I’m sorry to say, taking this unknown boat out with no experience and no help seems like a dangerous and selfish idea.

    If it were an 18 wheel truck, it would be illegal for you to attempt to operate it on the public roads. This boat seems similar.

    I see other here with much more experience than me are being nice and perhaps I am mistaken.

    All the best.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    You will be a danger to yourself and everyone else you come within a dozen boatlengths of.
    ^This. It's not just about you.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    If you have charts on which you can plot your position, most any hiking type GPS will work. Just make sure you get one that can get at least 5 satellites - that's what you need for accuracy. If you have the $, a good (at least 7") chartplotter makes life simpler. You still need a backup though.

    Also note that GPS coordinates are not always precise! GPS is based on a sphere & the earth is a bit egg shaped. There's a spot near Hyannis, MA (on the cape) that shows you, when offshore a couple of miles, as right in downtown Hyannis. This is where good binoculars with a built in compass are great for doing sights that you then plot on the chart. Fuji has some pretty decent ones for a bit over $200. https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?id=2392702
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  21. #21
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Why Brooklin? For best fuel use you will need to maintain a moderate cruising speed, hull speed for a 50' water line will be about 9 knots, which you would need to stay below. Looking at another forum I see fuel use for a vessel your size as .65 MPG at 22 knots. How long is your trip? 700 miles? That would mean 1000 gallons. You might be lucky to make that fuel use but at 9 knots fuel use might be half that, but instead of 35 hours it would be more like 80, meaning if you ran for 12 hours a day you might make it in a week. Do you have good ground tackle? Have you plotted anchorages along the way? Anchorages are dependent on weather conditions, as is operating the vessel at all. Is the boat registered or documented with the document up to date? My questions and input for now.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Don't leave dock without a good third party liability insurance policy. One that covers you under any and all circumstances for a few millions in property damage and a few tens of millions in environmental damage including removal and disposal of the vessel. Then buy a separate high volume engine driven pump plus hoses and have it ready for action.
    The reason for the above is that they forgot to install brakes on that old boat, so it will be a miracle if you don't hit something. When you do hit something, it will be big and expensive, a small policy (under one million) is useless. Given that it's sure the boat has some rot in the frames and/or bad fasteners you are more likely to sink then the object you hit.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    It may help to know that you are far from the first person to get into a boat and then come here for advice. It often is a pretty rough education. And the comments here may get pretty pointed. Rumars advice is pretty good (actually it is excellent) about insurance and it opens the door to a substantive discussion about this situation.

    First, as you may understand better from some of these comments, moving the boat in a responsible manner may be more expensive than you are willing/able to pay.

    The boat was free and it looks like you have acquired some sort of ownership interest. That may be very unfortunate for you as owning this boat may come with a significant price tag even if you tried to walk away today. Storage fees or destruction and disposal fees.

    I only bring this up because it may soon become apparent that a very expensive and risky trip, or paying to have the boat destroyed, or paying storage fees (along with the price of repairs) are your only options.

    I wouldn’t sign any (additional) documents until you understand the situation better and talk to an attorney.

    I can’t imagine the cost to you personally if the boat springs a plank 100 yards off shore and sinks. Others will know.

    (edit: Maybe $939,000 for fuel only. https://www.boatingmag.com/essential...ance-coverage/ )

    I hope this works out for you.

    PS-a professional survey may give you a better idea of how likely it is that she will actually float.
    Last edited by bluedog225; 08-10-2020 at 09:15 PM.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    I wouldn't disagree with a word that's already been said. But I will add that if you can afford a couple of thousand for fuel, then by all means you should be able to install a good chart plotter. For someone new to navigation, this is not a place to cut corners. A good unit with a decent sized screen can keep you out of all sorts of trouble.

    That, and you really, really should have a hand on board. There are youngsters, aka boat bums, looking for a bit of adventure in all the ports. Food and transport back home might be the only expense.
    -Dave

  25. #25
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Welcome aboard Tinhorn.
    Good luck with your boat and your trip. I suggest you bring a seaworthy tender or liferaft or both, just in case.
    If you change your mind about crew, I might be able to give you a few days at no cost to you except food. I own a 39' wooden ketch that I have cruised from Florida to Massachusetts. It's been 33 years since I operated a big motor boat, but in the CG I was qualified to conn a 95' PB, coxswain a 41' UTB. Be careful, keep us posted, fair winds.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Hey Tinhorn

    I hope you check back in and let us know how it is going.

    That’s a pretty nice offer from John.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    You should have at least 2 other people with you- including someone that is experienced.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Got underway Thursday, I'm in Bridgeport CT as of yesterday. The forum,says the token has expired and i havent been able to post

  29. #29
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    But wow what a boat, handles great, there's been less than,an inch in the bilge since Wednesday, it got launched on Monday. Everyone at Scaranos was incredible helpful but especially Eric Everson. My father has come with me on the trip and I'm very glad he has, docking would have been a nightmare. Today I'm going to try to get to New London but I expect I can get to Newport today. The only issues I've had has been 1. My fuel supply line fitting but came loose and I lost pressure, engine died in the middke of NY harbor, fixed in 20 minutes after I figured out the issue
    And 2. My shaft seal came a little loose so it was leaking much more than it should. Made it snug but not too snug.
    But wow what a boat. Hopefully i can keep,posting I'm not sure why but I had to re login, search and open the forum and now I can post. Hope everyone is having a good day, hope I didn't cause any heart attacks

  30. #30
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Welcome back!
    Thank you for the update, I'm glad you are progressing well. Minor mechanical problems are not unusual on any cruise. Enjoy the rest of your trip!

  31. #31
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    I'm glad you took the sage advice offered here and took someone with you.
    Barring any big mechanical problems or leaks, you should be fine.
    It'll be interesting to see how the boat handles the open waters of the ocean, although Long Island Sound can get pretty rough when it wants to.
    Enjoy the trip!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Welcome back and glad you're enjoying your adventure. Glad your Dad was able to come along...voyages are often more enjoyable as a shared trip. Looking forward to hearing (and seeing?) how it all goes.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Glad things are going well.

    On the forum issue, it is a little wonky sometimes. For me, a login is required each time I visit. The cookies or tokens, do not persist. Other than that, you should be able to post freely.
    Last edited by bluedog225; 08-23-2020 at 10:38 AM.

  34. #34
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    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    Nice boat - she definitely seems worth saving. I'm late to this party and others have already offered most of what needs to be said, but a few comments for what they are worth:

    It sounds like you have successfully managed to dock the boat, which is an accomplishment in itself in a single-screw vessel with high freeboard and significant windage. So congratulations there! It sounds like you have references to give you the general principles or maneuvering so at this point experience will be your best teacher. However learning as you go can bring some difficult lessons. It is more than likely that at some point in this process you will hit something. So two things to remember:

    First, never, ever, under any circumstances should any person put any part of their body between the boat and something it is about to hit. It seems obvious, but sometimes in the moment it's possible to forget that the boat weighs some tens of thousands of pounds and will easily crush you if you are not careful. Use a fender or a boathook to fend off if possible, otherwise get out of the way. And second, if you are going to hit something, choose something inexpensive. Better to hit a piling or a dock than the multi-million dollar yacht moored astern of you.

    You and you father must wear your PFDs. All the time. No exceptions. One thing about learning while doing is that it requires a lot of mental effort, which takes your attention away from basic things like holding on to the boat. It is far more likely to fall overboard or have some other accident when you are focused on doing something new, and pretty much every minute you spend between now and Brooklyn, ME will be new. So wear your PFDs. All the time. No exceptions.

    Docking is important and good to practice but anchoring is absolutely critical. If you have a mechanical problem, as you did in NY Harbor, but in a more constrained body of water, you may need to keep the boat from being swept into a bridge abutment or some other danger. In which case you absolutely must be able to anchor. It can also save you a very bad time if you cannot reach your planned destination for some reason. Better to anchor for the night and continue on in the morning than to keep going.

    So before you do anything else, read your references on where and how to anchor and then find a place to anchor and practice doing it. Do it several times. Make sure you know how much rode (anchor line) to let out for a given depth. More is better. 3:1 (three times the depth) is generally the bare minimum. 5:1 is better. Make sure you can raise and lower the anchor with whatever equipment you have aboard. Make sure that every piece of your ground tackle from the anchor to the bitter end of the rode is in good condition. It does you no good to have 200' of chain aboard if the shackle connecting it to the anchor is rusted through. And it will do you no good to find out too late that the bitter end is not actually secured to the boat, as you watch it rattle overboard and vanish into the depths. So check your equipment and learn how to use it.

    Don't run at night. It makes everything harder and you will have enough to do without making things harder.

    Pay attention to the scale of the chart on whatever device you are using. Especially on small screens like mobile phones it can be easy to miss a charted rock or shoal. Never assume that an open body of water is safe. Always check your course at a scale that will let you see every marking on the chart and steer well away from anything you might hit.

    Know on which side you will have to pass any navigational aid (buoy, daymark, etc.). In any channel you will generally be going between a line of red buoys on one side and green buoys on the other. The rule is that you keep the red buoys on your right (starboard) side when you are coming into a port, and the green ones on your right when you are leaving (remember "red, right, returning"). But sometimes it's not that easy to figure out which way you should go, which has led to many, many grounding incidents. So check the chart and go where the deep water is, and not the other side.

    Do one thing at a time. Without exception, the times I have gotten myself into trouble have been when I was doing too many things at once aboard the boat.

    Finally, if you can find a copy of "The Elements of Seamanship", by Roger Taylor, buy it and read it. You may find one at a marine store on the way and if so you should get it. If you read only one book at all, read that one. And then read it again. It may very well save your life.

    Good luck. Cruising in a boat like your Passagemaker is a fantastic experience and I hope you enjoy it. Some days will be better than others. But keep the bad days from becoming disasters and then let them go and look forward to the good days, because they can be very, very good indeed.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    9,096

    Default Re: 52' Beebe #135 restoration

    I'm glad you brought your dad along and things are going smoothly. Having a deckhand was the most important point raised here.

    Best of luck for the remainder of the trip. Take plenty of photos!

    Jim

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