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Thread: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

  1. #1
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    Default outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    Have any of you put an outboard on a Swampscott dory?
    My arthritis is a problem for rowing or raising sails, but I love my dory. The only way I can see being able to use it is with an outboard.
    Is it possible?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    I have not, though I have owned two, three counting the 10' dory skiff. If I wanted to motor one I might try a side mount or more likely an electric motor. I have used a trolling motor on the tender.
    If you don't intend to sail, a motor well might do also.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    A trolling motor or electric outboard would be light weight and certainly do-able. This year I put a small electric outboard on my skiff. At only 13 lb for the motor, I made a bracket that fit onto the existing gudgeons in place of the rudder. On a Swampscott with the steep transom angle you would probably have to make some simple bracket for the transom or side mounted. I think a well would not be needed if lightweight electric, the heavier battery could go inside.

    This is mine, it does a bit over 4 kts at full motor power.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    So it's got a rudder. Consider this. 2 or three batteries would give you considerable range at half throttle while adding the weight down low that dories love. Best if the rudder tilts up for rowing.

    https://minnkotamotors.johnsonoutdoo...mount?id=13616


  5. #5
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    The neatest way that I have seen a dory rigged for an outboard is to put a vertical bulk head (in effect a secondary transom) in the boat at the after end of the bottom. Then cut a hole of the appropriate size in the raked transom. It can be big enough to allow for kick up. There may have been some fashion pieces to which the planks got fastened where the raked cutaway transom didn't have enough meat.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  6. #6
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    I did what Ben Fuller suggested to a Lowell's boat shop "Salisbury Point Skiff", which is essentially a swampscott but with a wider bottom and transom. Gotta admit, it was a total waste of time. I even made a filler box that made the bottom whole and flush again when the motor wasn't used. Under power it would tilt toward the outside of a turn, and it was very wet in any kind of a chop, and slow. Very slow. Of course I didn't expect it to plane or anything, but it was surprisingly tender, wet, and slow. I had a 6 hp. longshaft Evinrude in it. All that said, I think if your expectations are very modest, the elec. motor that attaches to the rudder would probably be a good bet. My mistake was thinking it would make a great all around utility skiff. If I had been a little older and more patient, probably a 2hp engine would have been fun and a lot more appropriate.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    What does the Forum think of using a canoe mount. Ready-made and a canoe is " similar " to a dory in being double-ended. Like so:

    Screen Shot 2020-07-31 at 4.59.53 PM.jpg
    Screen Shot 2020-07-31 at 4.59.44 PM.jpg

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    I have tried off side mounts and after a roque wake or two completely submerging the power head a few times I gave it up as impractical for anything but a small lake, maybe the best is a small outboard well. A swampscot dory should need over 2 hp.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    Quote Originally Posted by earling2 View Post
    I did what Ben Fuller suggested to a Lowell's boat shop "Salisbury Point Skiff", which is essentially a swampscott but with a wider bottom and transom. Gotta admit, it was a total waste of time. I even made a filler box that made the bottom whole and flush again when the motor wasn't used. Under power it would tilt toward the outside of a turn, and it was very wet in any kind of a chop, and slow. Very slow. Of course I didn't expect it to plane or anything, but it was surprisingly tender, wet, and slow. I had a 6 hp. longshaft Evinrude in it. All that said, I think if your expectations are very modest, the elec. motor that attaches to the rudder would probably be a good bet. My mistake was thinking it would make a great all around utility skiff. If I had been a little older and more patient, probably a 2hp engine would have been fun and a lot more appropriate.
    Thinking about where I saw the rig, it was on a dory used by the Penobscot River Pilots maybe in the 40s to get out to fuel barges heading up river from an island launch. If they had anything more than one of the old 2hp or so Evinrudes I'd be surprised. The more robust units had a well just aft of amidships. A dory is hard because it is so easily heeled. I like the idea of an electric trolling motor no matter how its mounted as you would end up with weight low. And I think some of them have mounts that allow the motor to rotate 360 degrees so it might be able just to be clamped to the side.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  10. #10
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    Many, many years ago, I built a outboard in a well for a Swampscott. Bronze angle. Could pull it up. Can't remember much else. Forty years ago.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    Quote Originally Posted by SeniorLady View Post
    Have any of you put an outboard on a Swampscott dory?
    My arthritis is a problem for rowing or raising sails, but I love my dory. The only way I can see being able to use it is with an outboard.
    Is it possible?

    Hello SeniorLady, yes, I have put an outboard on my Swampscott dory. It was on my Ougtredīs Amberjack (Stickleback) Dory "Patepluma".
    First tried with bracket (see video) using electric outboard (Torqueedo and Minnkota).




    Both worked ok for short distances (one hour at reasonable speed in protected waters).
    Tried also with small gasoline Outboard Honda 2.3 hp. Small aircooled light motor on bracket as for greater distance and better power (wind, waves) gasoline is better choice.
    Motor on a bracket has some disadvantage: Due to high position of motor one sits also higher in the dory and this is not the best way to load a dory. Better to sit lower. Even the Honda was light (29.5 pound), one has to sit high to be able to operate the tiller.
    This was the reason to cut a small motor-well in my dory and I put the motor in this well. Was ok and works also with electric (Torqueedo or Minnkota). Anyway, for my visits on the laguna of Venice the option with the Honda worked fine, but if wind and current is slightly stronger than usual than Honda 2.3 with two passengers is not the best option. I missed some more power. Also putting gasoline in internal tank of this motor on the water with waves is not optimal. Anyway, system worked ok.
    If size and transom-shape of Your dory allows I would recommend 5 hp Motor with external tank. Motor to sit in a in a transom-motor-well.

    Torqueedo on bracket:

    DSC07589.jpg

    Honda 2.3 hp on bracket:

    DSC03781.jpg

    Minnkota in motor-well:

    DSC01184.jpg

    Honda 2.3 hp in motor-well
    Bild 5.jpg


    SeniorLady, anyway, to help You in making Your decisions it would be fine to see fotos/dimensions of Your Dory.
    Last edited by Pateplumaboat; 08-02-2020 at 04:26 AM.
    Hay mas tiempo que vida!

  12. #12
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    There is also the option of getting somebody to make up a trolling motor in the rudder blade. I've seen one of these in action and it is amazing. You can row or sail with the rudder up to get the prop out of the water, or release the lanyard to have the rudder drop fully down for power.



    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...electric-motor

    Can we assume you either never rigged your dory for sail or have stopped sailing her?
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    I grew up in a Swampscott dory with a 3 horse Johnson mounded on the transom. Worked well and provided hundreds of hours of joy on the water.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    SeniorLady, here my Swampscott dory "Patepluma" (Amberjack/Sickleback-Design from Iain Oughtred) with an electric Outboard in a well:



    Important: Those car-batteries needed for electric outboard are quite heavy! Alternatively You could choose lithium-batteries (for example "Torqueedo" or similar). Those are relatively light, but quite expensive. If You do not need to carry batteries (charging-current near the place Your boat is in the water), this would not be such an issue.
    Last edited by Pateplumaboat; 08-06-2020 at 05:30 AM.
    Hay mas tiempo que vida!

  15. #15
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    Default Re: outboard on a Swampscott dory?

    Optima AGM marine batteries are lighter, they won't ever spill acid, they have a longer life span and they cost more.

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