Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 37

Thread: First sail of 2020

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default First sail of 2020

    I’ve slowly been making improvements to my boat over the winter and yesterday, in the interest of our national wellbeing, I decided to practice some social distancing out on the water. And as a completely unrelated benefit, I got to test how well my improvements work.


    Previously, every time I’ve launched I’d get blown into the dock while trying to rig the sails. It’s been frustrating and I finally decided to rig a brail line that bundles everything up into a neatish package. My plan is to rig the boat in the parking lot, brail up the sail, and launch the whole thing ready to go. Then I can row out to deeper water, let the sails down and start sailing. Hopefully this will improve the lifespan of the paint on my gunnels.


    Now that spring is finally here, I’ve been watching the weather looking for a nice day. The water is still ~50, so I wanted easy wind, nice air temperatures, and a protected area to sail. Today was forecast to be 10-15mph wind and 80 temperatures, so I set out to a nearby boat ramp on Gwynn’s Island. This island offers a 2.5 x .5 mile strip of water that is ideal. One note if you ever go to this ramp… there are power lines across the parking lot, but there’s plenty of room to maneuver around with the mast up.


    My general plan for the day was to sail to the southern part of the island and if everything was going well, continue on to Rigby Island which is all that’s left of a whole line of sandy barrier islands that stretched south. I wanted to scope it out as a potential stopping point on some future camp cruising adventure. After Rigby Island I would consider sailing out to Wolf Trap Light, assuming the conditions were good. Wolf Trap Light is caisson lighthouse about three miles off the coast. From what I’ve been told, the HMS Wolf ran aground there in the late 1600’s, so I guess it’s a Wolf trap! After returning from the lighthouse, I’d take “the hole in the wall” which is a narrow channel between the sandbars that used to be barrier islands. I figured this would give me a good opportunity to practice aiming for a precise location and trying to find it with little in the way of landmarks. The entire trip would be about 20 miles.





    However, even the casual observer will quickly see by my GPS path that I didn’t quite make it. Best laid plans…





    It turns out the warmer air brought a ton of fog because the water is still cold. Advection fog it’s called according to Wikipedia. The 80 weather and 10-15 mph wind didn’t quite make it, although it was a nice 70 day.


    Anyway, I got to the ramp around 10am and started rigging the boat in the parking lot. It took about 30 minutes, but I did have some trouble with the brail line tangling up which required me to raise and lower the sail a few times. But eventually I got everything sorted and got the boat launched. Based on the conditions, I’m pretty sure the passerbys thought I was a fool.



    The bundle could be neater, but it worked well. The framing could be better too... Totally didn't notice the reflection in the water when I took the picture.


    I rowed out a bit, dropped the sails and rigged the sheet. Much better than trying to do it while banging into the dock! The next problem was the rather concerning lack of wind. There was just a hint of breeze and I started heading towards the bay. I soon began wondering why the boat seemed to crab across the water when I realized I’d forgotten to put the centerboard down. That helped things considerably.


    I drifted and sailed along for a little over an hour, in and out of the wind shadow of the island. Things would pick up as I came to the mouth of a creek, then slow down when I was closer to land. I tried every light air dinghy sailing trick I knew, although that was limited to sitting on the leeward side and the occasional wiggle of the rudder to see if that made any improvement. I thought about the oars, but this is my yacht and I’m a proper yachtsman, not some galley slave! Eventually I resigned myself to watching nature go by. Ducks paddled away, a pair of Canada geese honked as they changed course for me, an osprey flew by with a stick, fish splashed out of the water, a waterman cussing his outboard echoed out of the mist.



    A pair of ducks that seemed a bit alarmed by their sudden change of pace.


    Towards the bottom of Gwynn’s Island I watched a ripple of wind coming and the sailing picked up. Once I was out of the wind shadow of the island the boat speed increased to 4.5-5mph which was a welcome change. It’s nice hearing the gurgle of water and seeing a trail of bubbles off the transom. The fog that was supposed to burn off before I even arrived at the boat ramp was still hanging around and there wasn’t much to see, so I started following lines of crab pots.


    Last edited by The Jeff; 03-31-2020 at 05:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    For a while the fog was getting lighter, but it soon changed to thicker than when I left. Before I could see 4-5 crab pot floats, now it was down to 1 or 2. I made the executive decision that if things hadn’t noticeably improved by 12:45 I’d head back. Not because I had any misgivings about the boat, just that it was getting a little boring seeing just a patch of water and then nothing.



    The theme from Master and Commander started playing in my head.





    Shortly before my self imposed deadline a buoy materialized out of the fog. This is the buoy that marks “the hole in the wall”. I decided that this was a decent accomplishment for the day and I’d turn around here. On a side note, I need to do something about all the lines up by the mast. I think I’m going to add two more belaying pins because currently I have two or three lines per pin and it’s a bit of a mess.





    On the return trip I decided I’d try to steer straight runs with the compass, then check the GPS track and see how I did. I did a 180 and headed back to the ramp. So far navigating has been with Google maps on my phone to get an idea of where I am, and then trying to hold a course with the compass. It worked ok and I never felt like I was lost. Also I’m happy to report that my little hook to hold the snotter is working great and I no longer have creases in the sail.





    After a while I started seeing trees in the fog and found my way back to the ramp.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    By this point the wind had picked up and brailing the sail while on the water was a little exciting. But it worked ok and I rowed the boat back to the ramp. After pulling the boat out and getting everything unrigged, the fog started to lift. Go figure!





    I recorded my GPS track to analyze. I averaged 3.6mph, had a top speed of 6.1mph, and spent nearly 2.5 hours on the water. The entire trip was 5.6 miles. I’m not good at estimating windspeed, but if a nearby weather station is to be believed, the wind was somewhere around 5 knots. Steering a straight line with only a compass was harder than it sounds, but in my defense I was taking pictures. At least that’s my excuse and I'm sticking with it.





    So while I didn’t accomplish anything I set out to do, I did confirm the brail line setup is the way to go and I got a lot of confidence navigating in fog. I never once felt uncertain about the boat’s capability which is turning into a welcome theme every time I take it out. So that's my first sail this year!
    Last edited by The Jeff; 03-31-2020 at 06:02 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,603

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Thanks for sharing. Today was too marginal for me to go sailing, 50 degrees and a typical spring mix of lots of wind, sunny moments and heavy rain.

    Sailing in fog is pretty weird, especially trying to hold a compass course. So easy to be convinced the compass must be off.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toodyay, Western Australia
    Posts
    1,214

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    What an awesome boat! Enjoyed your pics and comments. The fog went away when you stopped sailing, therefore either your sailing was causing the fog, or there is some kind of divine joke being conducted at your expense.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Nice to see the improvements you made are working out. Thanks for posting--looks like it was a nice day on the water.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    21,362

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Maryland has closed down recreational boating.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    4,361

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Nice! I'm trying to get out soon, but I'm still assembling the dinghy rig. I love off season sailing, and have also forgotten that warm days bring fog, especially on the South Shore of Long Island.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by Hwyl View Post
    Maryland has closed down recreational boating.
    Wow. I would have thought boating (solo, anyway) would be an excellent method of social distancing, but I suppose busy ramps might see gatherings get too big. Any other states doing this? I haven't heard anything from Wisconsin.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg;
    Thanks for sharing. Today was too marginal for me to go sailing, 50 degrees and a typical spring mix of lots of wind, sunny moments and heavy rain.

    Sailing in fog is pretty weird, especially trying to hold a compass course. So easy to be convinced the compass must be off.
    It was enlightening how quickly my course swung 20-30 degrees when I didn't look at the compass for a while, although I'm sure some of that is due to inexperience. Makes you appreciate only working in two dimensions rather than three like an airplane pilot. My father was an oyster inspector for a while and he said his boat had a list of all the buoys and creek inlets with compass bearings, time, and different engine RPM to the next for operating in the fog. He said accounting for the tide was done by a SWAG. Apparently dense fog was prime opportunity for the less than reputable watermen to go tong up everything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock;
    What an awesome boat! Enjoyed your pics and comments. The fog went away when you stopped sailing, therefore either your sailing was causing the fog, or there is some kind of divine joke being conducted at your expense.


    Thanks! I am pretty pleased with the design. I spent ages looking at every sail and oar design I could find to try and get a good one. Tom's real world experience with the Phoenix III really helped push me in this direction. I figured the stitch and glue First Mate would go together quicker than glued lap. I've enjoyed reading your trip reports with Blow Fish, it looks like a pretty good design too.

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom;
    Nice to see the improvements you made are working out. Thanks for posting--looks like it was a nice day on the water.


    Thanks, the improvements are working out well. It's just that every time I go out, I come back with two or three more improvements needed. Maybe in 5 or 10 years I'll get her set up the way I want haha.

    Quote Originally Posted by hwyl;
    Maryland has closed down recreational boating.
    I could see closing boat ramps maybe, but I fail to see how banning people with waterfront access makes any sense. At least currently in Virginia "outdoor exercise" is ok. Fortunately I live at the end of a long creek so I'll be able to do some canoeing if I feel like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky;
    Nice! I'm trying to get out soon, but I'm still assembling the dinghy rig. I love off season sailing, and have also forgotten that warm days bring fog, especially on the South Shore of Long Island.
    Thanks, hope you'll be able to get out soon! If you do, post something for the rest of us to read! haha

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    68,562

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Nice!

    Remember... it wouldn't be an adventure is everything went precisely to plan <G>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Today I made it! 21.1 miles in 5.5 hours. I'll put up some pictures tomorrow... I still feel like I'm bobbing up and down.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Cool! I look forward to hearing more.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Today was forecast to be a really nice day, so I decided I’d try again to make it to Wolf Trap light from Gwynn’s Island after my previous attempt was cut short by some serious fog. I’ve also made a few improvements which I wanted to test. I epoxied in two additional belaying pins and welded up a stainless catch for the centerboard rod.





    All loaded up and ready to head to Gwynn’s Island. I get some strange looks when I pull in at the boat ramp beside a row of lifted F250’s pulling 300hp center consoles. Clearly I’m in the wrong line of business.





    I launched right at low tide and I was a little worried I wouldn’t be able to get to Rigby Island since it’s so shallow. Fortunately I could rely on a rising tide throughout the day and hopefully a boost on the return trip.





    This time I did a better job of brailing up the sail. I think some bungie cords might be easier to use rather than wrapping the brail line around everything. I’m starting to get better at getting everything rigged and launched without incident. From arriving to launching took 40 minutes.





    Heading away from the ramp on a run. My mother was a postmaster on Gwynn’s Island and she’s told me stories of how that swing bridge would sometimes stick open. One time it jammed just before a hurricane arrived and she was worried she’d have to stay in the post office. But fortunately they got it closed again.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Towards the bottom of Gwynn’s Island I saw a number of watermen checking crab pots. Growing up I used to think I wanted to work on the river, but I bet the freezing cold or sweltering hot days would outweigh the nice days.





    Heading towards Rigby Island. It was somewhere along in here where I heard an unwelcome grinding sound emanating from the centerboard. The boat speed also seemed to take a hit. Looks like I was running out of water! I need to get a jam cleat and mount it to the centerboard cap for the downhaul. Currently I just tie the line around the thwart, but that makes it hard to get the board up in a hurry.





    The sandy part of the island is so low that I was having a hard time seeing it and I strayed into a shallow area. I made a turn towards shore because most of the houses had docks, so I assumed there was deep enough water.





    There are a lot of sandbars in this area and with the low tide they were just barely submerged.





    Navigating by the color of the water. The sandbars seem to be pretty sharply defined though.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Heading out into the bay. I found a row of PVC pipes marking a channel between islands so I followed it out rather than follow the shore further south.





    There’s Wolf Trap light on the horizon! It’s a little over 5 miles away. As I got away from shore the wind started picking up. The waves were the biggest I’ve had the boat in, maybe 3′ at times but the majority were probably 1.5-2′. At one point I had waves coming from two different directions and the wind from a third… so it was an adventurous trip. The boat really handled it well.





    Eventually I made it to the lighthouse. I wanted to circle it, but the wind shifted so I’d have to beat directly towards it. Everything was making me start thinking about heading back, so I decided to turn around. Maybe another time. These pictures really don’t do the waves any justice.





    I took a few video clips on the way out, although they still don't do the waves justice. It's a weird feeling seeing a swell taller than the transom coming but the boat just slides up over it.





    So I turned around and started aiming at what I thought was Stingray point just north of Gwynn’s Island. It turns out that was actually Windmill point and I was a little over 20 off of where I should have been going.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    After checking my phone I realized I was about to miss my exit.





    Heading through the hole in the wall wing and wing. Despite being ~30 yards wide in places the channel was well marked. I’ve been thinking about making a tool that is a combination whisker pole, boat hook, and mounts to the rudder head to support a tent’s ridge line.





    Nearly back to the ramp. I went 21.1 miles in 5.5 hours with an average speed of 3.9 mph and a max of 6.8 mph. I think I need to get my GPS tracker to take more finely spaced points. It’s currently set to take a point every 2 seconds, but I can’t believe 6.8mph is the max I hit today. Or maybe things just feel faster than they are in a small boat. Either way, I am getting a better idea of range which will be helpful in my longer camp cruising plans.





    Like usual, I found some more improvements are needed. I need to bed the centerboard case cap down with something because water splashes around in the case and comes out where it meets the main thwart. I spent most of the trip sponging water out. The centerboard rod needs a jam cleat for the downhaul. A tiller extension and side benches are starting to work their way to the top of the list. The extra belaying pins and hook for the centerboard rod worked great though.


    So that's it for this trip!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Corvallis Oregon
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Great adventure Jeff - thanks for the detailed write-up and pix. really enjoyed it.

    me - I pulled the boat into the driveway, gave it a good wash, and then put it away. The ramps I use to launch are all closed due to the Covid-19.

    get the Clam Cleat autorelease for your centerboard pennant.

    It functions as a depth finder- when you hear it pop, its getting too shallow! I also have one on my rudder downhaul.

    You can thank me later!!

    Cheers, Bill stuck at home, on land, in Oregon

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    north queensland
    Posts
    2,819

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Thanks Jeff...small boat sailing is just the sweetest pastime ever. I really enjoyed your pictures and story.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    BC Bill, the auto releasing cleat is a good idea! I have one for my rudder but didn't even think to use one on the centerboard. I've also been thinking about putting lead in the board so it just stays down. Although then I might need an uphaul if I only wanted the board half way down...

    Hopefully you'll be able to get out soon. Thankfully it's still allowed here and I'm never closer than 10-15 yards to people.

    Thanks Bernadette, there's a lot of truth in the saying that small boats get used more.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    7,051

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Great stuff... reminds me of going around the Stones bouy, N Cornwall. Not quite as far as you went to get to Wolf Light though. Love it.

    What's the small bracket on your port gunwhale Jeff?

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Wow! That sucker is 16 miles out into the Atlantic! What did you take out there?

    Haha that bracket is a homemade oarlock. I made the looms on my oars too big and needed a set of oarlocks pronto because I wanted to take the boat on a vacation. So I welded up something from some stainless 1/2" round bar for a thole pin, 1/4" round bar for a holder, and a big washer to ride on the wooden riser piece. They seem to work ok, so I haven't gotten around to thinning down my oars.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    7,051

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    Wow! That sucker is 16 miles out into the Atlantic! What did you take out there?
    No, not so far, it is approximately where I placed a pin. I guess around 5Nm from St Ives harbour. The waves do get pretty big out there however. Sailing with other dinghys was always interesting, their masts would disappear in the troughs behind the rollers, then reappear well above your head.

    Screenshot (23).jpg

    I had a Mirror Marauder 14'6", steel CB, over built and rightly so. I miss those days.

    Loving your adventures, please keep them coming.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    7,584

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    BC Bill, the auto releasing cleat is a good idea! I have one for my rudder but didn't even think to use one on the centerboard. I've also been thinking about putting lead in the board so it just stays down. Although then I might need an uphaul if I only wanted the board half way down...

    Hopefully you'll be able to get out soon. Thankfully it's still allowed here and I'm never closer than 10-15 yards to people.

    Thanks Bernadette, there's a lot of truth in the saying that small boats get used more.
    It doesn't seem very widely known in the USA but you can hold a centreboard in just about any position by adding friction rather than lead or a downhaul line.I don't know who first came up with the idea but Jack Holt used it on the GP14 in the late 1940s and it still works.You need a short length of rubber hose and a metal strip which are held in place and adjusted with a couple of screws.This shows the sort of thing.




    For more friction you tighten the screws to flatten the hose.It works up to quite high speeds.It also leaves the board exposed if it all goes wrong.A weighted board drops when the boat is inverted.


  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    I like that system--seems simple and effective. But it pre-supposes an open centerboard case top, and also a rigid handle to push the board down, doesn't it?

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    7,584

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    It does need an opening large enough for the handle to move through an arc sufficient to allow the full range of adjustment.


  27. #27
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    7,051

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Why couldn't one use an up and downhaul line protruding through a closed cb case? No cleats needed, perhaps with purchase however.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Why couldn't one use an up and downhaul line protruding through a closed cb case? No cleats needed, perhaps with purchase however.
    Makes sense--I hadn't thought about a downhaul line.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    No, not so far, it is approximately where I placed a pin. I guess around 5Nm from St Ives harbour. The waves do get pretty big out there however. Sailing with other dinghys was always interesting, their masts would disappear in the troughs behind the rollers, then reappear well above your head.

    Screenshot (23).jpg

    I had a Mirror Marauder 14'6", steel CB, over built and rightly so. I miss those days.

    Loving your adventures, please keep them coming.
    Oh, when I googled I thought you were talking about Seven Stones. That would be an adventure! I can imagine seeing sailboats completely disappear would be wild. It makes my ~3' waves sound wimpy haha. Have you read The Unlikely Voyage of Jack de Crow? A guy takes a Mirror from England to the Black Sea with mostly on the job training.

    I'll try to keep the adventures coming as long as I can... I might try to do some more with video too. I have a feeling politicians will just be spoon feeding us one 30 day stay at home order after another for quite a while. Virginia's cases aren't supposed to peak until August and who knows if boat ramps will be shut down by then.

    John, that system does look interesting. Since I have a rigid bar on the board it looks like it would work. I'm probably going to go with the cleat though because I also plan to tie my compass off to it.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: Out to Wolf Trap Light

    June 27th, 2020

    Today was forecast to be 90 with 10 mph wind and I thought it would be a great opportunity to attempt to round Wolf Trap light again. A few months ago I made it to within about 350 yards, but I turned back because the wind really picked up and it didn’t feel entirely prudent. I talked my wife into coming with the promise that we’d stop at the sand bar on Gwynn's Island on the way home. We went 19.8 miles in 4:22 with an average speed of 4.5 mph. Our max was 8.8 mph which is the best yet! I think the extra weight of two people and gear might have helped keep her flat.



    Rigging the sail in the parking lot which wasn’t nearly as packed as it was the last time we launched, although we did arrive a bit earlier. I managed to get launched in just under 30 minutes which is a record too. I’ve got a few ideas to make rigging simpler that I’d like to experiment with.



    I’m pretty pleased with the name I painted a few days ago. You can read more about how I did it here.



    Setting off from the ramp and heading down Milford Haven close hauled. We had to make one tack to get angled right to make it through the channel which leads into the bay. How was this photo taken?



    By my lovely wife risking life and limb!


  31. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Out into the Chesapeake with the lighthouse just a tiny spec on the horizon six miles away. Its incredible how calm things are compared to the last time I was out here.



    Starboard! It always feels a little weird knowing I have right of way over boats 2-3 times my size.



    Getting closer to the lighthouse. We were making good progress towards the light, but the wind shifted and we had to bear off out into the bay a little further. Then I tacked too soon and we missed the light, so we tacked again to work our way back.



    But eventually we got there and rounded it.



    Coming around the southern side.


  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Thanks for posting--looks like a nice outing. It's nice to have a destination to take you out a ways rather than idly daysailing, I've always found.

    I notice you don't have an adjustable outhaul on the boom--is that something you've thought about rigging?

    On the balance lug Phoenix III, I did adjust outhaul tension occasionally. Not often.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    I agree, I usually try to have a destination or a goal for an outing. I'm tentatively planning an overnight trip for next Saturday, depending on the weather of course.

    I have thought about an outhaul, but so far it's been toward the bottom of the improvements list. Do you have a picture of how yours is set up?

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,041

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Here's a screen shot from a video clip:

    Pretty simple if I remember right--my brother just uses a small stainless ring lashed to the end of the boom. A line dead-ends at the boom tip, runs forward through the clew, back to the ring, and then turns forward to a small jam cleat on the top of the boom.

    Tom
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 07-08-2020 at 11:50 AM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: First sail of 2020

    Thanks Tom, that looks pretty simple to rig. I was mostly wondering if you had mechanical advantage or just ran the line through the beehole back to a cleat.


    Somehow I doubt the uh… facilities… were a particularly comfortable place in the dead of winter with the wind howling up the bay.





    Heading back towards Gwynn’s Island. I keep meaning to move that mid boom block closer to the boom. I felt pretty clever clipping the radio onto the oarlock to get it up a little higher, but then I later learned in this month's Small Boats Monthly that horizontal is basically the worst position. Maybe I should make a bracket somewhere.





    My wife got feeling a little seasick while we were going downwind, so she retreated to the starboard settee in the salon. The waves were probably 2′ or so and produced a rolling motion which thankfully has never been a problem for me, although after a long day I do feel like I’m still rolling when I go to bed.





    Coming back through the hole in the wall we made a right and found an empty spot on the sandbar.





    The wind had picked up a bit, so I brailed up the main sail and we came in with the jib only in an effort to keep our speed down. However, that didn’t really help as we were still going 5 mph downwind towards the shore. I tossed my homemade anchor out, payed out some line, and it immediately brought us to a screeching halt. I’m impressed with how well it works.


    Last edited by The Jeff; 07-09-2020 at 05:13 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •