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Thread: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by peb View Post
    That's not exactly a non contact sport either.
    Don't worry, peb.

    Remember, it's just like the flu. And soccer is played outdoors, which makes it perfectly safe. And we're probably past the peak. And other countries are doing worse than we are. And we're probably at herd immunity already. And even if we're not, the economy is more important than people's lives and health. And children can't spread OR catch the virus, and even when they do, they don't get seriously ill. Besides, all we REALLY need to do is worry about the assisted living facilities where we have made the truly vulnerable even more vulnerable. But we still shouldn't worry about needing to wear masks, because the virus will disappear when summer comes, and it wasn't a disaster in Germany or Denmark.

    Did you forget how you've established all that in your many thousands of posts to COVID-19 threads, or are you changing your tune?

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 07-22-2020 at 06:58 AM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

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  2. #37
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Another COVID-19 committee meeting this morning. I'm VERY happy to say that the district seems to have done a nearly complete 180 on the mask issue since last week. I suspect a large part of the cause is that responses to the staff survey were available to administrators on Monday morning (I won't get to see those responses).

    More details later, but I think we just made a safe(ish) school re-opening much more likely.

    According to CDC guidelines, we should not even be considering in-person classes with a 26-day increase in new cases locally, but I guess that's the discussion for next week's meeting...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

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  3. #38
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    I had an encouraging conversation with the county's director of public health this week. She asked me to put my concerns in writing so she could share them with the county board at meetings. After double-checking with my union about the legality of speaking publicly as a private citizen, here is the message I sent her in case anyone's interested:

    I am a public-school teacher in ____ County, and I feel a responsibility to share my concerns about re-opening schools during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. I hope that my perspective will help you and other county officials make informed decisions about how best to protect the community as the school year begins. Please understand that I am speaking as an individual, and not as a representative of any organization or school. However, I have been involved with my district’s COVID-19 planning process over the summer, and I can offer a perspective informed by over 14 years of teaching.

    First, I know that there is significant pressure from the community to return to in-person classes for public schools. I would like to see that happen as well—but only when it can be done safely. Guidance provided by both the CDC and the White House has set a 14-day decline in new COVID-19 cases as a fundamental prerequisite for a safe reopening of any community.

    But rather than a 14-day decline, as of July 22, ____ County has seen an increase in new cases in 27 of the last 28 days, and the case load has more than doubled in that time. Conditions are even worse in neighboring counties (where some school staff, including me, live and travel every day). Given the CDC/White House guidelines as a starting point, the only approach that is consistent with science-based recommendations is to move to online classes for the majority of students. Summer camp COVID-19 outbreaks in Missouri and Texas have shown that, despite the best of intentions to follow safety protocols, putting hundreds of teenagers into close proximity can result in rapid spread of the virus, which will affect not only students and staff, but their families and the entire community. If a similar situation happens in ___ County’s schools, it could overwhelm local medical resources very quickly.

    I believe that school districts and parents will be very reluctant to accept the reality that online classes are the only safe choice according to experts, but that is the reality. As you are probably aware, Wisconsin’s 5 largest teachers’ unions have asked for a state-wide mandate for online classes. Milwaukee County and Dane County have already committed to opening with online classes only.

    Statewide orders seem unlikely given the current political situation, so I urge you to consider a mandate for ____ County requiring the county to meet CDC prerequisites before in-person classes are allowed. Frankly, after more than 14 years of teaching, I do not see any way that schools can open safely for in-person classes given current conditions. At the very least, I hope that you can require schools to link their re-opening plans to specific COVID-19 related metrics (i.e. at this case load and rate of new cases, you must move classes online; at this level, you can provide in-person classes for limited numbers of students; at this level, you can re-open for all students if you provide distance and/or mandatory masks).

    However, if in-person classes are allowed despite the additional risks they pose to the community, it will be important to reduce those risks as far as possible. Unfortunately, it will be very challenging for schools to implement expert recommendations about COVID-19 safety successfully. Here’s why:

    First, many of the expert recommendations for how to open schools safely will be virtually impossible to implement because of lack of funding, lack of staffing, and lack of available space. For example, best safety practices include maintaining a 6’ physical separation between people. That translates to no more than 6-8 people in a typical classroom. However, class sizes at the middle school/high school level range from 15 to over 30 students in most schools. As a result, unless significant changes in scheduling are made to reduce the number of students attending at the same time (alternate day classes, classes in shifts, block scheduling so fewer classes are taught each day, etc.), adequate physical distance will be impossible to provide. And from what I have seen, school leaders are not planning for significant changes in the school schedule to accommodate safety measures.

    Separating students into small pods or cohorts, keeping each group isolated from other groups, is another common recommendation to slow the spread of COVID-19 and make contact tracing easier. While this can probably be done to some degree at the elementary school level where students are already arranged into separate classrooms, it will be impossible at the high school or middle school level, because each individual student has a different schedule of classes from their peers.

    Masks are probably the most important safety measure that would be practical at the high school and middle school level. However, some districts in the county have not yet committed to a mandatory mask policy. Some have proposed a partial mask policy, requiring masks only when 6’ distance cannot be provided. However, since aerosolized virus particles can remain airborne for hours, letting a small class go maskless will increase the risk for everyone who uses the same classroom later in the day.

    If schools choose to return to in-person classes, busing will also be a major concern. Without the funding and resources to add additional routes and buses, students will be forced into close proximity for a significant amount of time each day. Again, it will prove impossible to provide 6’ of physical distance to protect the driver and students.

    As a further logistical concern, if in-person classes are offered, even one staff person testing positive for COVID-19 could shut down an entire middle school or high school for weeks, which would leave us worse off than if classes had been moved online from the start.

    I’ll close by encouraging three specific courses of action at the county level:

    1. I urge __________ County to respect the expert guidance of the CDC and the White House, and require a 14-day decline in new COVID-19 cases before allowing schools to offer in-person classes at full capacity.

    A smaller number of students—especially those needing extra support, special education accommodations, or those with unsafe home environments—can be accommodated safely while the main part of the student body takes classes online. The county should allow schools to open for those students, on that limited basis, so that they are not further disadvantaged by a lack of in-person instruction.

    However, allowing schools to offer in-person classes at full capacity would be, in my estimation, dangerously irresponsible until COVID-19 conditions approve.

    2. I urge, even more strongly, that ___ County issue a non-equivocal mandate to require masks for all people inside public buildings, including schools.

    Without a county-level mask mandate, some (perhaps many) school districts will not require masks. As a result, hundreds of students and staff will be forced into close contact for 7-8 hours each day, in spaces with limited ventilation, with a large circle of contacts, with no protective measures available. That is a risk our communities cannot afford to take.

    3. If in-person classes are allowed, I urge ________ County to issue a mandate requiring weekly COVID-19 testing for school staff. Most experts agree that outbreaks will be inevitable if schools re-open. Periodic testing will help recognize outbreaks in early stages, before carriers show symptoms (if they ever do). Without regular tests, a single infected staff person could infect hundreds of others, making effective contact tracing and quick response extremely difficult if not impossible.

    Thank you for your attention and consideration. I know you are facing an incredibly challenging task in balancing community interests regarding the 2020-2021 school year, and facing great uncertainty about what is possible both legally and politically. I appreciate the opportunity to share my perspective as an individual with direct experience in ___ County public schools. Good luck with your work, and thank you for your efforts.

    Sincerely,

    Tom Pamperin
    public school teacher
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    My wife is an elected member of our school board. Last night the board held a meeting for the community (a very large district in the fox valley of Wisconsin). The board was in the board room and the community attended via zoom, 5 minutes per parent was allowed. One posted Qannon gobbledygook nonsense, some 10 yo took over briefly because the way the meeting was set up he wasn’t restricted from doing so. She got home after midnight with a migraine.

    kids will have the option of attending in person or learning on line. The hope is enough stay home that social distancing will be possible.

    masks will be required.
    __________________________________________________ ________________________

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    CK 17,

    thanks for the info. It's got to be a very tough time to be on a school board right now!

    I hope things go well in the Fox Valley. I have a niece in school in that area.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Not sure if this has been mentioned. According to Betsy DeVos school children are “stoppers” of the virus.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...ge%2Fstory-ans


    “More and more studies show that kids are actually stoppers of the disease and they don’t get it and transmit it themselves, so we should be in a posture of — the default should be getting back to school kids in person, in the classroom.”
    — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, in an interview on “The Conservative Circus” (iHeart radio), July 16

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    That's a well written statement Tom, I wish you the best of luck in the "negotiations".

    Peter

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    OK, an update. We had our final committee meeting this week. A few thoughts:

    I had asked for someone knowledgable about our HVAC system to attend. He was there, and very helpful. Here's what we learned:

    1. The district is looking into upgrading from MERV7 (I think) to MERV13 HEPA filters. MERV13 is the lowest recommended upgrade to increase safety, but not a perfect solution. This will be incredibly expensive, and is not settled yet.

    2. They are also going to provide ozone treatment overnight for rooms on a rotating basis--apparently this is some kind of disinfectant effect, but I don't know anything about it yet.

    3. I mentioned that European schools that re-opened recommended increasing the percentage of outside air in the HVAC system as much as possible, up to 100%. Our HVAC tech said the default winter setting in our system is for 5% outside air. He said they planned to "push the boiler to the max" to see how much they could increase that, but could not provide a number since it's never been done before. The implication seemed to be it would be far short of 100%.

    4. I pointed out that both the state health department and department of public instruction recommend BOTH masks AND distancing, and asked for an official vote from committee members whether we should make a complete "masks when indoors" policy (the current plan was "masks required when distancing is not possible"). Only one other teacher (a science teacher) agreed with me.

    5. Just as our meeting ended, word came online that Wisconsin's governor had imposed a state-wide mask mandate for all indoor spaces, beginning tomorrow. We'll see if it faces legal challenges--his stay at home order in May was challenged by Republicans, and the state supreme court supported Republicans. BUT--the newly elected liberal justice will be sworn in tomorrow, which will very probably mean a challenge won't be struck down, as the balance on the court has shifted, and they only won by one last time.

    6. Interesting to see that there were 3 of us wearing masks at this meeting.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

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  9. #44
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    OK, then we broke for lunch and met again with the elementary school committee for a final summary presentation with the superintendent. Not much new here, but I learned a few things:

    1. We have no substitute teachers. The ones we relied on before are all older, mostly retired teachers, who have said they won't be coming back. That could mean that prep periods will not happen, as teachers will have to serve sub duty. Or, it might mean the district hires a full-time teacher to be an in-house sub. Or both.

    2. The district has been allotted $97,000 in state funds (funds are still tied up in court, but the superintendent has been spending it anyway). That's a pittance for a school district. It won't begin to cover the additional costs.

    3. I apparently misunderstood the plan. I thought we would propose 3 separate plans (all in-person, mix of in-person and online, and all online). Instead, we will be running ALL 3 options simultaneously, and parents can choose. The "online only" option will involve a subcontracted virtual school, so teachers will not be involved at all. This program by all reports is very demanding, and serves self-motivated academically oriented students well--and no one else. It costs $5,000 per student, roughly--but since students will stay enrolled with the district, we'll keep the $10,000 per student funding.

    The in-person option will likely not provide adequate distancing. The "mix" option is not really mixed. It's this--all lessons will be filmed and recorded so students can access them online. Then they will do the same work as students who choose to attend in person.

    This was a surprise to me--I had no idea this "do all 3 things at once" idea was going to be the plan.

    4. The one that bothers me the most: Not once in the entire process was the question "Should we be opening for in-person classes?" ever asked.

    The county is seeing a steady increase in cases--not an increasing percentage (yet). Neighboring counties are at double or close to triple our per-capita infection rate. There are 5 ICU beds in the entire county. The CDC, White House, and state agencies have recommended a 14-day decrease in new cases before moving to a "Phase 1" re-opening; we've gone from 29 cases on June 24, to 102 cases today--a steady increase. Schools are not supposed to open for in-person classes until Phase 2, and we're not even in Phase 1. And no provision for testing staff or students is planned.

    Then, too, we are failing to provide more of the recommended safety measures than we ARE providing.

    I'm not optimistic.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    An update:

    I had a meeting with the principal and superintendent to lay out my concerns in detail. They listened politely but seem disinclined to make changes at this point. They are still relying on the county health department to tell them when to shut down in-person classes, though they admitted the have the authority to do so even if the county doesn't order it. They're in a tough spot, no doubt.

    But--the district has started from the presumption that the "old normal" will be the baseline. They have tried to fit in as many safety recommendations as they can without changing that baseline, but that means there are MANY recommendations they are NOT following. Distancing, for one. And masks, only because there is a state-wide mask mandate (which may well be challenged by Republicans, who successfully ended the stay-at-home order in May).

    In case anyone's still interested, here are the concerns I shared with my principal and superintendent.

    COVID-19 Concerns

    1. From my perspective, it appears that a preconceived intention to provide in-person classes, rather than science and current local data, has been the primary basis for decision-making in developing the district’s current plan.

    A more open and objective process would have begun with a review of which safety measures could be provided and which could not, and then moved on to establish what minimal gating criteria for consideration of in-person classes should be. Only at that point would an informed and objective discussion about whether to provide in-person classes or not be possible.

    It appears that the district is choosing to plan for the most optimistic projections available, rather than planning conservatively to prioritize the safety of students, staff, and the community.

    2. The rate of community spread of COVID-19 is more than 6 times greater than the prevailing rates in European schools that were able to reopen successfully.


    • The University of Nebraska Medical Center notes in its guidelines for school re-opening that


    A review of school openings in multiple countries has revealed a clear pattern: all have waited until community transmission was below ~ 10 cases/million/day. The main exception was Denmark, which was the first to reopen in Europe with a national transmission rate of 35.5 cases/million/person/day; however, Denmark’s staged opening was with micro-groups contained in virtual cocoons with no outside contact (COVID-19 Back to School Playbook 5).


    • As of early August, the 7-day average in _____ County is 64.2 cases/million/day, more than 6 times greater than the rate seen in most successful re-openings throughout Europe, and also well outside the more optimistic 25-50 cases/million/day recommended by the University of Nebraska for schools in the U.S.


    3. According to multiple expert analyses, current conditions in Dunn County are not safe for in-person classes.


    • Gating criteria for a Phase 1 re-opening have not yet been met according to the original Badger Bounceback plan.
    • Both _____ County and its neighboring counties are currently rated “High” in COVID-19 activity under the DHS’s “next generation of Badger Bounceback.”
    • A recent analysis published by the New York Times predicts that, if re-opening for in-person classes does occur, a school with 500 students in ___ County will have up to 3 students arrive on the first day of classes already infected with COVID-19.


    4. There are a significant number of recommendations provided by DHS, DPI, and CDC guidance for managing a safe re-opening that the district cannot incorporate.


    • The recommended 6’ of physical distance will not be provided to protect students and staff. In a July 29 teleconference, DPI and DHS experts were unequivocal in stating that both masks AND 6’ physical distance are recommended for safety; it is not meant to be an either/or decision.
    • Under the current plan, the MS/HS student body will not be divided into separate small cohorts to limit the spread of the virus and enable effective contact tracing.
    • The current plan makes no provision for staggered shifts, hybrid models, or modified schedules to enable distancing.
    • The current plan does not implement DPI’s recommendation to leverage outside spaces for increased safety.
    • Requiring staff to conduct in-person classes raises potential conflicts with DHS recommendations that people aged 60 and over should work remotely whenever possible.
    • DHS recommends that even when Badger Bounceback gating criteria have been met, “Online education and work are encouraged wherever possible.”


    The current plan has made very few changes to the basic structure and schedule of the school day at the MS/HS level to enable the district to provide more of the recommended safety measures. Instead, the plan seems to retain the “old normal” as a baseline, and has added only those safety measures that are able to fit within the “old normal.” That is contrary to DPI’s recommendations that schools approach spaces and schedules creatively and flexibly to maximize safety.

    4. There is growing evidence that significant transmission occurs in situations where young people are gathered in large groups for in-person activities.


    • On July 30, an Indiana student tested positive for COVID-19 on the first day of classes, resulting in the need to quarantine that student’s close contacts for 14 days. A Microsoft News poll of 6,730 people found that 71% of respondents expect that Indiana’s situation will be the norm in “all other school districts as they start opening.”
    • A Georgia summer camp outbreak infected 260 campers and staff; a CDC review of the incident concluded that “children of all ages are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and, contrary to early reports might play an important role in transmission.”
    • A Missouri summer camp was forced to shut down after 82 people tested positive for COVID-19.
    • Multiple summer camps in Texas (including at least one day camp) have been forced to close when campers and staff tested positive for COVID-19.


    5. School outbreaks have shown the potential to have a devastating impact on the surrounding community.

    Within 2 weeks of a full school re-opening, more than 244 students and staff in Israel tested positive. As of July 14, outbreaks tied to schools in Israel had resulted in 2,026 students and staff being infected, with more than 28,000 people forced into quarantine.

    These school outbreaks occurred despite very low levels of community spread in Israel at the time, and have played a major role in causing a spike in COVID-19 infections nationwide:

    The source of the infection explosion can be seen clearly in the numbers from June. As Kliner told the Knesset, 1,400 Israelis were diagnosed with the disease last month. Of those, 185 caught it at events such as weddings, 128 in hospitals, 113 in workplaces, 108 in restaurants, bars, or nightclubs, and 116 in synagogues, according to Kliner, while 657—which is to say 47 percent of the total—were infected by the coronavirus in schools. (SOURCE)

    6. There is growing evidence that the virus often has drastic long-term health effects on those who survive infection, including damage to lungs, heart, liver, and kidneys, along with significant neurological damage.


    • “Data from the COVID Symptom Study, which uses an app into which millions of people in the United States, United Kingdom, and Sweden have tapped their symptoms, suggest 10% to 15% of people—including some “mild” cases—don’t quickly recover” (SOURCE).


    7. HVAC systems may increase the spread of COVID-19; there does not seem to be not enough information or resources to know whether they will be safe.


    • European schools have recommended increasing the circulation of outside air to 100%. The committee was informed that a 5% setting was typical in winter, and that it is impossible to predict how much that setting could be increased.
    • Our reliance on HVAC will make it impossible to follow expert guidance that suggests using windows and fans to increase ventilation.


    8. Relying on a plan that will likely not be sustainable for the entire semester may cause more disruptions to individual students’ education than beginning with a more conservative plan that avoids in-person classes until community spread is brought down to safer levels.
    I'd be very interested to hear any thoughts or feedback. Cheers,

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Nicely done. But... you're talking to 'policy wonks', with really, no skin in the game. If you need to get their attention - insist that all those folks responsible for your planned approach actually have to have the same 'contact experience' they're insisting upon for you and others.
    There's a lot of things they didn't tell me when I signed on with this outfit....

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    All I can say is that I hope you get a mild case when you gt it and you will.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    If I were in your shoes I would gather up my skirts and quit

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I had a meeting with the principal and superintendent to lay out my concerns in detail. They listened politely but seem disinclined to make changes at this point.

    They're in a tough spot, no doubt.

    I'd be very interested to hear any thoughts or feedback.
    Canoeyawl gave you an option. One that I suggested earlier.
    Life is complex.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Schools have opened in GA. Mark 2 to 3 weeks ahead of today on your calendar, and see what things look like down there.

    Steve Martinsen

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Well, I'm in no hurry to quit a job that I quite enjoy for many reasons.

    For one thing, we're 4 weeks out from the first day of classes. If things continue to go badly, the county or state may step in to shut down in-person classes, or the district may do so on its own.

    I've also started to coordinate our local union to have some kind of coordinated response. I honestly don't know how many of my colleagues see things the way I do, or are willing to speak up if even if they do. It is not, currently, an especially active union local.

    Then there's always Wisconsin state law, which might be of some use:

    No public employer may discharge or otherwise discriminate against any public employee it employs because the public employee ... reasonably refused to perform a task which represents a danger of serious injury or death or exercised any other right related to occupational safety and health which is afforded by this section.
    But I'd like to keep things as non-adversarial as I can.

    Tom
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  17. #52
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by George Jung View Post
    Nicely done. But... you're talking to 'policy wonks', with really, no skin in the game. If you need to get their attention - insist that all those folks responsible for your planned approach actually have to have the same 'contact experience' they're insisting upon for you and others.
    Thanks.

    I'm not sure how far that's true in a small rural district like mine. I don't think we HAVE "policy wonks"--our admin and superintendent are right in the building with us, and the school board... I don't know the board well yet, but this is rural Wisconsin. Many of them are probably already working non-remotely in their own jobs.

    I do think teaching poses some added risk--being in a classroom with 20-30 students for 6 hours a day, with recirculated air and no distancing. But making that claim too loudly could alienate others who have their own risks (parents and board members working in-person jobs).

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

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  18. #53
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    I was told (unofficially) that the admin here is relying on peer pressure to get the students to take masks and testing seriously. I am not optimistic. I do note that at least half of the students in that photograph are not wearing a mask, but then Georgia as a state is not taking this seriously. Perhaps it will be more successful elsewhere.

    I do predict that COVID will run rampant through the student body pictured and in 2 to 4 weeks the school will be closed.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by SMARTINSEN View Post
    Schools have opened in GA. Mark 2 to 3 weeks ahead of today on your calendar, and see what things look like down there.

    Same county, already had to quarantine a second grade class due to a covid positive student. DSE

    https://www.ajc.com/education/cherok...GPMHXUBG3INBQ/

    I had a test yesterday in GA and flew back north to NH today. Have another test scheduled for tomorrow in NH. Quarantining here is pretty easy. Mainly getting tested since my parents are close by. I have remained pretty isolated while back in GA other than retirement day and we did our best to keep distance and wear masks, except for pictures.
    Tom

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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilkinson View Post
    Can anyone tell me how you play HS football while maintaining distance? We are going forward with it apparently. The CDC guidelines I have read seem to make it sound impossible, but no one is gonna make Georgians give up their football, and they are essentially requiring a halftime show from the band, so my son is required to go to rehearsals soon. None of this makes any sense to me at all.
    My local school district trying to figure out a music program without singing and without instrument playing. They say they the plan is still being formulated.

    On the face of it it sounds stupid.

    But what is a school board, a superintendent and a school full of teachers, food workers, facilities people and a bus company going to do while trying to satisfy several hundred families? Academics, music, sports, after school activities and all the other things....

    I wish them well.
    Last edited by Redrcrvrp1; 08-04-2020 at 08:15 PM.

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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilkinson View Post
    Can anyone tell me how you play HS football while maintaining distance? We are going forward with it apparently. The CDC guidelines I have read seem to make it sound impossible, but no one is gonna make Georgians give up their football, and they are essentially requiring a halftime show from the band, so my son is required to go to rehearsals soon. None of this makes any sense to me at all.
    <br><br>My local school district trying&nbsp; to figure out&nbsp; a music program without singing and without instrument playing.&nbsp; They say they the plan is still being formulated.<br><br>On the face of it it sounds stupid.&nbsp;<br><br>But what is a school board, a superintendent and a school full of teachers, food workers, facilities people&nbsp; and a bus company going to do while trying to satisfy several hundred families? Academics, music, sports, after school activities and all the other things....<br><br>I wish them well.&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>&nbsp;< br>
    <br>

  22. #57
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    Default

    Woohoo!! Three days into the school year and four schools in Cherokee county alone have positive corona cases and classes quarantined. What could possibly go wrong?

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.ajc...outputType=amp


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    Tom

  23. #58
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    Default Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Multiple students in Columbia county, Ga as well.

    https://www.augustachronicle.com/new...county-schools


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    Tom

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    CORINTH, Miss. (WMC) - Corinth School District now has confirmed COVID-19 cases across the district.

    Corinth was the first school district in Mississippi to return to the classroom. Now in its second week, the district has seven confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus.

    On Wednesday, positive tests were reported at the middle school and elementary school. The district says the individual at the elementary school who tested positive is an employee.

    https://www.wmcactionnews5.com/2020/...hool-district/

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Paulding county students are now being suspended for posting photos, teachers are being threatened for saying anything that may show the school in a negative light, there is a covid outbreak on the football team after group workout fundraiser (really??), and the school nurse has resigned. What a cluster-f#@&.

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...aulding-county

    https://www.wsbtv.com/news/former-pa...HZZG6BLEEHTGE/
    Tom

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Such an overreach? These school officials MUST be taken into court and held accountable.

    By the way, a Larry Tudlow, Director of the United States National Economic Council, is on TV right now calling for students to get back to school. He's a shill for Trump.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilkinson View Post
    Paulding county students are now being suspended for posting photos, teachers are being threatened for saying anything that may show the school in a negative light, there is a covid outbreak on the football team after group workout fundraiser (really??), and the school nurse has resigned. What a cluster-f#@&.

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...aulding-county

    https://www.wsbtv.com/news/former-pa...HZZG6BLEEHTGE/

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    .
    But... but... but... aren't more and more studies showing that kids are actually stoppers of the disease and they don’t get it and transmit it themselves? Aren't they almost immune from the disease? Don't they have much stronger immune systems than we do somehow for this? Isn't it so that they do not have a problem?

    It must be true because The President of the United States of America and the United States Secretary of Education tell me so.
    "We have come to live in a society based on insults, on lies and on things that just aren't true. It creates an environment where deranged people feel empowered." -- Colin Powell, 10/30/18

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Montgomery View Post
    .
    It must be false because The President of the United States of America and the United States Secretary of Education tell me it's true.
    Fixed that for you.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Cherokee county, Georgia

    Etowah High School Temporarily Closed After COVID-19 Cases Surge

    Gee, I wonder why?


  30. #65
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    I was reading this AM that over 100,000 kids have tested positive over the last two weeks.
    Last edited by Old Dryfoot; 08-12-2020 at 12:06 AM.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said in a press conference Monday that he is happy with school reopenings across the state.

    “I think quite honestly this week went real well other than a couple of" viral photos, the governor said.

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy W View Post

    I didn't think it was possible to have a whiter student body than you find in northern/northwestern Wisconsin, but it looks like Georgia pulled it off. I don't know why I tend to think of public schools in the South as more ethnically diverse... It's clearly not always the case.

    Even around here we see more masks being worn!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom
    I didn't think it was possible to have a whiter student body than you find in northern/northwestern Wisconsin, but it looks like Georgia pulled it off. I don't know why I tend to think of public schools in the South as more ethnically diverse... It's clearly not always the case.
    North or South schools in metropolitan areas are not diverse.
    Life is complex.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by Too Little Time View Post
    North or South schools in metropolitan areas are not diverse.
    You sure about that?
    Both pics from my sons school. What a dumb statement.
    DSC_00461.JPG
    IMG_8000-768x512.jpg
    Tom

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Re-Opening Plans for a COVID-19 School Year

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I didn't think it was possible to have a whiter student body than you find in northern/northwestern Wisconsin, but it looks like Georgia pulled it off. I don't know why I tend to think of public schools in the South as more ethnically diverse... It's clearly not always the case.

    Even around here we see more masks being worn!

    Tom
    White flight.
    Tom

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