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Thread: GIS, First Mate, Argie 15, others?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    7,790

    Default Re: GIS, First Mate, Argie 15, others?

    On the cheap vs. full marine--there is a middle ground. Around here, at least, big box stores (Menards, Lowes) sell decent 1/4" Baltic birch plywood. By "decent" I mean very smoothly finished and pleasant to work with, 5 thick plies of equal thickness, and no voids I've ever hit. Last I looked it was about half the price of marine ply.

    The trade-off is, it's heavy, and is not marine-rated. That said, I have sailed two boats built of it for 11 years now with no sign of problems. I think it's perfectly fine for a dry-sailed trailer boat.

    And did I mention it's half the price of marine ply?

    As for epoxy, you could start with a gallon and see how far that takes you. That's where economy kicks in. If you get near the bottom of the jug and see you'll need more, easy enough to order.

    There have also been boats built with PL Premium, which would probably work with a design like the Mayfly. But I'd rather use epoxy.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Loon Lake, Washington
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: GIS, First Mate, Argie 15, others?

    Instead of garaging the boat for the winter I think it's small enough to get some friends together and turn it over.
    Set it up on saw horses well off the ground and just leave that fiberglassed bottom exposed, and all the hatches off underneath.
    Good ventilation seems to be the key for longevity.

    As to the build, I would recommend ordinary ACX plywood, Tirebond III glue ( you'll need a gallon of it) and stainless steel sheet metal screws.
    You can get the screws at Duckworks here - https://www.duckworks.com/product-p/fas-ssws-parent.htm

    Or maybe you can find them at a local hardware store. I get 'em by the box at a local Ace Hardware for about the same price as Duckworks, without the shipping.

    For fiberglass cloth I go to Amazon.

    I use ordinary Bondo brand polyester resin for fiberglassing. No need to use epoxy on this boat at all.
    Spread that cloth over the bottom and roll, brush or squeegee the resin on. Do a second coat immediately after the first to fill the weave.
    Sand the hull when you're done, or the paint will not stick! Do this fiberglass work outside!

    Use Bondo Glazing and Spot putty to fill all the screw head holes.




    Give it a coat or two of primer, then two coats of ordinary semi-gloss exterior latex paint.
    You can do some light sanding between the coats pf paint if you wish. Rolling on the exterior latex gives an excellent finish.

    A well made boat using these materials will last until you stop taking care of it.
    Seriously.

    What kills a boat fastest seems to be letting it collect rain water as it sits out in the open unused!

    My La Madalena was built this way back in 2017, and is still in perfect shape. I see no reason why it will not last 40 years.
    It spends spring, summer and fall outside, upside down in the yard, in the water or on top of a car loaded up ready to go.

    I really see no need for expensive materials for your first boat.
    Built this way it will last as long as you need or want it to.
    You will not get your money out of it if you ever sell it, so why bother with epoxy and such?

    Another consideration is that Douglas Fir plywood is perhaps harvested a little more responsibly than tropical hardwoods, and it's a local resource.
    You don't have to encourage the devastation of the remaining rain forests just for a few sheets of plywood to build your little skiff.

    SAM_8610.jpg

    Of course, you can go too cheap!

    My second boat was made of 12 dollar a sheet underpayment plywood-
    After two seasons it looked like this -

    SAM_7483s.jpg

    Edit- Oh, by the by, Duckworks is also a good place to purchase your rudder hardware.
    This can be difficult to get locally, depending upon where you are.
    Last edited by Etdbob; 08-03-2020 at 03:41 PM.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Loon Lake, Washington
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: GIS, First Mate, Argie 15, others?

    I need to add that Epoxy is hatefull stuff to work with!

    Very Toxic!

    If your kids are helping, use that Titebond III glue by all means!

    You can smear on Titebond right out of the jug with a finger, no big deal. With a decent fit and clamping it holds much stronger than the wood.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    7,790

    Default Re: GIS, First Mate, Argie 15, others?

    Hmm... Epoxy is toxic, all right. And polyester resin is cheap and may last some years on a cheap boat. But having used both, I'd say that polyester resin is FAR more unpleasant to work with than epoxy.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

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