Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 44 of 44

Thread: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Monadnock, NH, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Okay, looking forward to putting the boat back together better than it was...
    The chine log is definitely mahogany. By the way, I've confirmed in a Chris Craft history book that the transom was originally fir ply. Still possible it was replaced but it is the original material at least.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Any updates?

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Monadnock, NH, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I have to take a few weeks off from it unfortunately. I’ll be back at it next month - I’ll be sure to update the thread with some photos!

    Since I sanded only part of the hull, is it okay to overlap some of the new primer over the previous topcoat paint a little bit if it’s scuffed with sandpaper?

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    18,271

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    yes, that is normal painting practice.
    It is when the goal is perfection...that's when ya gotta sand it all with thousand grit on a long board.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Monadnock, NH, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    FINALLY am getting back to this... just screwed the plywood into the chine with new screws and replaced a couple small areas of plywood that had some rot.

    Do I need to fill the screw head holes with fairing compound if they are going to be covered with fiberglass tape? I was planning to but may be an unnecessary step? Trying to get this thing in the water next week!

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,830

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Yes, .... that screw heads need to be filled with 'something'.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Monadnock, NH, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    okay, I’ve begun putting tape down the seams. Is it overkill to do two layers of tape (4” and maybe a 5”) if I’ve also run a circular saw down the seam and filled with thickened epoxy?

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Monadnock, NH, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    The boat is in the water but is still taking on water! I think the keel to plywood seams must be bad as well. The water starts pooling at the bow so I know my repair at the transom is good.
    What's the smartest thing to do here? Rip off all the plywood and start fresh this winter?
    Or maybe just strip the bottom paint off the boat and clean out the remaining plywood seams, fill with glue and then tape? I think if I'm going to go that far it may make sense to just fully replace all the plywood.

    Thank you for getting me this far everyone. At least I've gotten to take it out a few times, it's very fun.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Thoroughly poke around everywhere and look for all bad areas. It would be a good idea to sand off the paint on all the seams so you can get a better look. Realistically assess if the boat is worth putting a lot of work into. If you've had a taste of working on a plywood boat, and you like it, you might consider building a new hull. If you're set on repairing the boat you have, I think you'd do best by turning the boat over and setting it upon a strongback that you built for it. Turning the boat over will allow you to work on the hull much more easily. Be realistic about your assessment. If too much is rotten and damaged, a new hull might prove a more fun and rewarding experience.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •