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Thread: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

  1. #1
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    Default Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Hello all,


    Iíve been searching the forum for the past few weeks as Iíve just purchased my first boat. Itís a small 12í 1956 Christ Craft Barracuda (kit boat). The boat was fully restored about 10 years ago, but has been sitting dry in a garage for the past 5 years.
    I sanded the ablative paint well, took care of some small epoxy fills where previous repairs were failing, and put a couple coats of Hydrocoat on the bottom. I just launched the other day and found I was getting some good leaking through the transom and hull joint. The boat is out of the water now while I figure out how to solve this problem!


    Iím inclined to put a band aid on the issue for this season and fix it for real in the off-season. Iím a woodworker by trade and have a full woodshop above my barn where I store the boat - so not afraid to do whatever is necessary, but am anxious to get boating this seasonÖ I plan to store the boat in the freshwater pond for the whole season.


    Thank you in advance for any and all advice!





  2. #2
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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Photo should bring you through Flickr album

    CC

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Nice looking boat and trailer. Can you show any pics of the leaking area from both an inside and outside view? Have you poked around for any soft wood in the ply and the in the transom? If the ply is rotten, the rot might extend farther than you think and you'd have to worry about the integrity of the hull planking being able to withstand all the forces it would be subjected to while underway. Tap around the ply and listen for dull sounding areas that would indicate the presence of rot. You might also search for bad areas by poking around a bit with a sharp tool to see if you can find any soft spots.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    This is a plywood boat, right?
    It should be DRIED, not left in a pond to swell or whatever.
    She should probably not be painted with antifouling.
    Put her back in the barn, grind off the leaky bits, (transom /keel),and post some more photos.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by slacktidemike View Post
    Nice looking boat and trailer. Can you show any pics of the leaking area from both an inside and outside view? Have you poked around for any soft wood in the ply and the in the transom? If the ply is rotten, the rot might extend farther than you think and you'd have to worry about the integrity of the hull planking being able to withstand all the forces it would be subjected to while underway. Tap around the ply and listen for dull sounding areas that would indicate the presence of rot. You might also search for bad areas by poking around a bit with a sharp tool to see if you can find any soft spots.
    Thanks slacktidemike, if you scroll thru the album you can see more photos of the inside and outside where the crack is.

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    This is a plywood boat, right?
    It should be DRIED, not left in a pond to swell or whatever.
    She should probably not be painted with antifouling.
    Put her back in the barn, grind off the leaky bits, (transom /keel),and post some more photos.

    Thanks wizbang, it is a plywood boat. Are you saying that a plywood boat isn't meant to live in the water for a whole season? I do know that a plywood boat shouldn't have to swell to be water tight - that's why I took the boat right out of the water as soon as it started leaking.

    I'll grind away at the transom/hull joint today and post more photos. THANK YOU!

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    The photos on Flickr seem to show the wood in the transom area looking pretty good. Can't really know without a poke around though. The seam between the ply and the transom appears to have opened up. I remember reading somewhere that some ply built boats in the 50's did not have any glue between the seams. They were held together with screws only and a seam compound was put between the ply and the hardwood in order to seal the joint. I'm not sure if that is true or not, but I wonder if your boat was built with an old-style seam compound and it has degraded somehow or dried and now the seam has opened up. If it were me, I'd try the most minimal work at first and maybe try using the least innocuous marine caulking or compound pushed into the seams. You might be tempted to use silicon, but don't do that. Silicon and wood boats should never meet in my opinion. I'd start by sanding away the paint and primer and getting down to the bare wood so I could get a better look at the situation.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I've sanded away at the joint where it was clearly pulling apart based on the dark paint line. Thankfully the wood underneath looks great - no rot that I am seeing.
    Would this be a good candidate for just fiberglassing the joint with fiberglass tape?

    Thank you!

    CC2

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I think 99% of modern plywood boats that are built like yours (glue and screw) are built with fiberglass over the chine area and transom seams. I first thought of fiberglass tape as well, but wondered how original you'd like to keep the boat. Fiberglass should solve your leak issue, but I don't think they used fiberglass back when your boat was built, so you'd be changing its originality.

    Do you think the fasteners are okay that are attaching the bottom ply to the transom? Have they become loose? Is that a small bit of rot on the port side down at the chine? If so, make sure to get it all out and repair the area. If you go with fiberglass tape, I'd use epoxy. Probably you'd also want to get some epoxy fairing compound so you could fill the weave in the tape and also fair the tape edges. Using a carbide paint scraper is a great way to smooth and fair hardened epoxy and faring compound. Read up on applying epoxy and faring compound. You need to do things like applying a first coat of epoxy before applying it over the tape. If you don't, the epoxy might soak into the wood and then you'd end up with a cloth that's too dry.

    The transom, at least on the outside, looks like fir plywood. I wonder if that's original and wonder if work was done in the transom area 10 years ago during the restoration. Fir plywood will check over time (it's a cosmetic issue) and most guys put fiberglass over it to prevent the checking. As a result, you might consider fiberglassing the whole outside of the transom and not just the seams.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Thanks again slacktidemike.
    I've hacked away at the two areas of rot at both the port and starboard at the chines - thanks for calling that out. How should I repair these areas? Should I route out enough to scarf in a new piece of plywood there? Or can I just fair it out and fill with faring compound?

    You're right about the ply, it is fir. I'm inclined to cover the whole transom with sheet fiberglass as you've mentioned. I'm not overly concerned with the originality of the boat as there have been restorations done that aren't original. Plus, it was a kit boat anyway...

    So, laying out a game plan - does this make sense?

    1. Clean up and repair the two areas of rot that's I've hacked away (faring compound or scarfing in a small piece of ply)
    2. Fiberglass tape all three transom to hull edges (starboard, port, and bottom)
    3. Fiberglass sheet over the entire outside transom
    4. Prime and paint

    Question: should the fiberglass tape that goes over the keel and lifting strakes just lay over these? Or do I need to remove a portion of the keel and lifting strake so the fiberglass lays under them? I would assume I'm supposed to just lay it over, but then there would be a small ridge where the tape ends.


    CC3

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    First thing I would do is to check from the inside how far the rot extends in the chine log. The pic from the inside makes the chine log look fine, so hopefully it doesn't go too far. Fairing compound is not meant for structural type repairs. For a repair area, use properly thickened epoxy instead. Assuming the rot is localized to the area you've worked on, I would clean it up well and do my best to get flatten surfaces and clean edges. I'd next epoxy in some solid wood that is the same type as the boat's framing. I'd make sure there was lots of epoxy in the repair so that I got good squeeze out where I set in the wood. I'd let that harden and then I'd router out a triangular shaped 1/4" deep flat area so I could set in a new piece of 1/4" ply. I'd do this more in a dutchman way versus a scarf way. I'd set the ply in thickened epoxy as well.

    I wonder about the chine log. There should be a screw in there somewhere. I'd want to make sure everything was held together well back there. I'd probably uncover the screw and check how well it is set into the transom framing.

    I'd put the full fiberglass sheet over the entire transom first without wrapping it over the edges. I'd remove the resulting overhanging fiberglass cloth and then slightly round over the edges of the new fiberglass and the ply. Next I'd put the tape over the edges. Then I'd fill the weave and the tape edges with fairing compound. After that, I'd use a scraper to fair everything down nice and flat and smooth. I've been amazed at how well a paint scraper will work for this. You could put the tape on first, but I've done the tape second on a few boats and I've had good luck with it.

    Ideally, the fiberglass should be under the lifting strakes and outer keel, but I wouldn't remove a portion of these just to put on glass and then have to scarf in new wood. To deal with the small ridge left by the fiberglass, I'd remove the new fiberglass completely from the strakes and keel. You might also fair it in to the strakes and keel with fairing compound, but I'd lean towards removal.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Okay great, this all makes sense to me. I will remove the wood screw that is attaching the chines to the transom - I think it's just one small #8 brass screw. Perhaps I will replace it with a fresh one. What do you cover the screw head with after driving it in? Faring compound?

    If I wanted to use the West Systems products, am I correct in assuming that I would use the 407 or 410 additives for the faring? And then something like the 403 additive for the gap filling?

    Thank you SO much for your guidance

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I have not experienced it, but have seen several times on this forum that where there is rot, the rot spores can extend up to two feet into solid wood. That is a major reason that filling the hole with filler of any kind is not a good idea.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Long, long ago, I went to a talk on rot at the School of Forestry at the University of Washington. It was stated that rot can spread very agressively in plywood. Two feet is an optimistic limit. Because there can be voids, yes even in marine plywood, rot can spread the width or length of a sheet. Really the only sure way to get rid of rot in plywood is to replace it. Slapping in a slug of epoxy might work for a few years, but is not an effective repair for the long run.

    Also, replying to another comment above...stating that plywood cannot be left in the water will come as a surprise to many plywood boat owners.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I did not state a ply boat cannot be left in the water, I said that storing her in a pond to swell up is a bad idea. Fix the leaks and rot , leave her in for as long as you like.
    I own at least 4 plywood boats. None leak.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    ulav8r and pcford are right about rot spreading farther than it might appear. Replacing the whole panel and multiple feet of the chine log might be more at this time than you want to do though. At the top of your post you said you're looking for a "band aid" that will get you out on the water this season. I think the quick, localized repair discussed above will more than get you through this summer. Next winter in your wood shop, if you're game for it, you could tear into the stern and replace everything all nice and new if you want. I suspect that a good localized repair now, covered with epoxy fiberglass, will probably be good for more than this season, depending on how well you keep the boat. Make sure to poke around the chine log, transom framing, and the ply so that you're satisfied you're into solid wood.

    I don't use West epoxy and don't, off the top of my head, remember their numbering, but I know they have good written materials on their various additives. For the repair, you want the structural / adhesive type additive. For the fairing, you want the one they identify for fairing. With epoxy, make sure you're careful about mixing it to the correct ratio. West has a lot of information about using epoxy correctly.

    The screw going into the transom from the chine log is probably larger than a #8. Maybe it's a #10 or #12. Number 8 screws were often used to attach the plywood on these small boats, but the structural parts like the chine log usually got a larger fastener. I fill screw holes with fairing compound.

    I think you're on the right track for getting out this summer and having some fun with the boat.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    When dealing with rot, I like to get wood presevative IN the wood, not just on it and all over the freakin job. I do this by boring strategically placed bores (holes) downwind of the decay and treating the holes as resevoirs. Sometimes the holes may be filled 2 or 3 times with poison and epoxied shut, sometimes left open indefinately.
    just something to consider...maybe a few vertical holes a few feet forward of the transom in the chine log.
    The chine log on a ply boat does not need to be strong really, it is just some solid wood for fastenings to grab. The CORNER of 2 plys coming together is where the strength is. It's not a structural thing like a stringer.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    That piece on the outside of the ply.... are you calling that a chine?
    What is on the inside of the sides and bottom at the corners ?

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I'm making short quick bursts here cuz often the posts are vanishing...wasting time and frustrating
    yes, 403 for strength...407 for fairing.
    410 may be overkill, it is for very fine work.
    When you do eventually glass the transom to bottom seam, round (radius) the corner quite a bit for the glass to go round, not just a little quarter inch.
    Later, when the glassing is hard, build the corner back up with 407. It makes a big difference in performance having that wee bit "sharp". Both in top endspeed and hole shots ( getting on plane quickly).

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    That fir transom is most def not original, it seems to have been assembled almost dry, and maybe the outer chine strip thingy was added as well.
    I'd remove it. It looks like nothing but trouble. What may have been intended as a piece to protect the plywood seam, will have the opposite affect over time. Water will wick in and the damage will be hidden , and it is almost impossible to glass over.
    looks like the whole boat is 3 ply fir.
    but yea, next winter...

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Okay great, this has given me plenty to go on. Quick question about primer and paint.

    I'm confused about what type of primer and paint to use because part of the transom is just below the waterline while the rest of it is above... When I search for primers for below the water line, I just see two part epoxy based primers like "Interlux Interprotect Epoxy Barrier Coat". Is this what I need to coat the transom or is it overkill? Is it safe to use a normal topcoat white paint to go over this even though part of it will be in the water?
    Last edited by willgmr; 06-28-2020 at 01:15 PM.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Interlux 2000 is excellent epoxy primer that can be used anywhere on the boat. One COULD use a regular alkyd primer on all of the boat , or split the types of paint in different places on the boat.
    But mixing different types of paint now to save the nickel will come back and bite you later. They sand a little differently. If you get a scratch or ding, I mean when you get a scratch or ding ,that crosses two types of primers, a small pita has been added.
    Besides, when using two part epoxy primers, one wants to avoid very small batches, in general.
    I stopped using conventional alkyd primers anywhere on the outside of any of my boats some years ago.
    Interlux 2000 is an excellent primer for you that I would recommend and suggest. Get the white, which is still a tiny bit gray,(it has microscopic pieces of aluminum in it)
    Any top coat can be used over the epoxy primer,alkyd enamal, one part poly enamal, or a 2 part LP,which is the best.
    The 2000 can be applied as thick as you can put it on, barring sags and drips. In other words, with a little experience, one coat of 2000 will be like 3 coats of alkyd primer, in build up. That is something to consider , expense wise, as well.
    It really does not come out all that much more expensive.
    bruce

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Okay, spent some time cleaning up the transom more and decided to remove a few inches of the outside chine strip since it would really be in the way of the fiberglass tape and it appeared to have been worked on in the past. I found the hull joint to be in crummy condition. What to do now? Is it best at this point to remove the entire outside chine strip so I can tighten up with screws and fiberglass that joint as well? Or can I simply tighten that little area with new screws, glass tape the corner as I planned to, put a new piece of chine strip over and call it a day?
    As you can see the port chine corner is much worse than starboard.

    I want to reiterate that I'm still hoping to do minimal work this summer (without doing further harm) and then do whatever in necessary next winter/spring.


    CC4

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    It doesn't look good. I wonder if the boat was leaking in more places than just the transom. The screw holes that went into the transom, and that are now opened up, show rot in the wood, so a lot of other screws are probably loose, too. I'd worry about the integrity of all the wood that the fasteners are set into. Things might start to come apart if the boat is used. The leaking likely shows the beginning of this failure and that's probably why the former owner stopped using the boat. You might do best to give up on this summer. To me, the boat needs to be stripped and all the screws and wood checked in order to assess how much work needs to be done. It's an old boat and probably requires a lot of work that's going to involve a lot of time and more than a little money. Hate to be a downer, but that's how I see it. Maybe others will have a different opinion.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Hmm, I donít believe the screws are necessarily failing. I removed all the screws going from the hull (all three sides) into the transom. They all seemed okay and were not easy to remove because they were well sealed by filler.

    Would it be worthwhile to remove the outside chine members? This way I could see the extent of the plywood rot at the joint all the way to the bow?

    Quote Originally Posted by slacktidemike View Post
    It doesn't look good. I wonder if the boat was leaking in more places than just the transom. The screw holes that went into the transom, and that are now opened up, show rot in the wood, so a lot of other screws are probably loose, too. I'd worry about the integrity of all the wood that the fasteners are set into. Things might start to come apart if the boat is used. The leaking likely shows the beginning of this failure and that's probably why the former owner stopped using the boat. You might do best to give up on this summer. To me, the boat needs to be stripped and all the screws and wood checked in order to assess how much work needs to be done. It's an old boat and probably requires a lot of work that's going to involve a lot of time and more than a little money. Hate to be a downer, but that's how I see it. Maybe others will have a different opinion.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by willgmr View Post

    Would it be worthwhile to remove the outside chine members? This way I could see the extent of the plywood rot at the joint all the way to the bow?
    I would take it off so that you can survey the state of the ply. Then you can fill and glass the full-length once you know that the ply is good.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by slacktidemike View Post
    It doesn't look good. I wonder if the boat was leaking in more places than just the transom. The screw holes that went into the transom, and that are now opened up, show rot in the wood, so a lot of other screws are probably loose, too. I'd worry about the integrity of all the wood that the fasteners are set into. Things might start to come apart if the boat is used. The leaking likely shows the beginning of this failure and that's probably why the former owner stopped using the boat. You might do best to give up on this summer. To me, the boat needs to be stripped and all the screws and wood checked in order to assess how much work needs to be done. It's an old boat and probably requires a lot of work that's going to involve a lot of time and more than a little money. Hate to be a downer, but that's how I see it. Maybe others will have a different opinion.

    It don't look bad... 65 year old ply boat, I think it looks pretty dang good !

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    It don't look bad... 65 year old ply boat, I think it looks pretty dang good !
    Did you click through the picture on the forum in order to get to the two other pics on Flickr? They don't look as good. Maybe I'm being too cautious, but I didn't like how the screw holes in the transom that have been opened up looked. It looks to me like they weren't holding on to much due to rot. It made me wonder about all the other screws at and below the waterline. The pic that shows the stuff that bothers me is not on the forum.

    There is certainly no harm in removing the full length of the chine rail so the entire length of the boat can be inspected and taped if desired.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I'm really grateful for all of your input here everyone - thank you so much.

    I've removed a few feet of the outer port chine member and came upon what looks like intact joint (photos below, red box shows where the joint is opening, blue shows where it looks to be still closed. I'll plan to go ahead and remove the entire length on both sides for peace of mind to survey the full length of the joint. I'll replace all the screws, epoxy the joint closed, and tape both lengths.

    Two quick questions:

    Is one layer of 4" tape enough for everything I'm taping?

    Also, I don't have any mahogany on hand right now. I do have plentiful quartersawn red oak though and some walnut. Will either of those be sufficient for replacing the outer chine member?

    THANK YOU!


    CC Good-Bad Port

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    One layer of 4 oz fg tape will not add any strength, but it will be enough to keep the water out...providing the boat is strong underneath.
    But one should make her strong and watertight before a strip of glass, thus. one should not need glass .
    I would not put the outer "chine" back on.
    I would run a circular saw kerf half inch deep down the old glue line, to open a gap and clean the seam .
    Thickened epoxy likes that gap.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    I think .... the pics in post 22 indicate a possible source of water infiltration in this area. The lower screws of the side planking are into end-grain and perhaps in combination with a fractured glue joint (it is glued here?) this over the years has allowed water in.

    If I was taping those seams I would put a substantial radius under 4" under 6" 6oz tape. When fairing same with WEST 407 or equal I would fill out and fair the chines as required. Other than the function as a spray rail up forward I find the outer chine would not be required. imho. / Jim

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    It looks like the screws holding the bottom ply have let go least in the right 1 or 2 feet of the red box. Now that the transom has been opened up, and the chine area uncovered, it wouldn't be too much trouble to scarf in a new chine log beginning at the left side of the blue box and then going all the way to the transom. The end grain of the new chine log could be capped with the triangular plywood patch. After that repair, the chine could be taped.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Not totally sure I follow that procedure. Would I be removing the internal chine member from the inside? That seems like major surgery to me. Or do you remove the plywood hull by the chine and transom? The member on the inside looks to be in good shape.

    also, if I run a saw kerf at all joints, is it imperative I put silicon bronze screws back in? Or will they be redundant with the new stronger joint?


    Quote Originally Posted by slacktidemike View Post
    It looks like the screws holding the bottom ply have let go least in the right 1 or 2 feet of the red box. Now that the transom has been opened up, and the chine area uncovered, it wouldn't be too much trouble to scarf in a new chine log beginning at the left side of the blue box and then going all the way to the transom. The end grain of the new chine log could be capped with the triangular plywood patch. After that repair, the chine could be taped.

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    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by willgmr View Post
    Not totally sure I follow that procedure. Would I be removing the internal chine member from the inside? That seems like major surgery to me. Or do you remove the plywood hull by the chine and transom? The member on the inside looks to be in good shape.

    also, if I run a saw kerf at all joints, is it imperative I put silicon bronze screws back in? Or will they be redundant with the new stronger joint?
    You do need to put the screws back in. Your boat is a "glue and screw" type build. Yours might even have just a sealing compound and no glue. The screws are necessary, even with an epoxy-taped seam. You may be seeing boats online that are built with epoxy and fiberglass tape only. These boats are often referred to as "stitch and glue" type boats. Stitch and glue building is a much more modern way of a building a boat, and the boats obtain strength from the very specific way all the tapes and fabrics are epoxied into the joints. An epoxy-taped seam on your glue and screw boat is not meant to, nor is it strong enough to provide the strength needed to safely hold your boat together. The epoxy tape is great for preventing water penetration into your boat's plywood edges and into the screw holes, but it won't provide sufficient strength.

    As an option to consider, the repair I proposed above involved replacement of what I refer to as the chine log. The chine log in your boat is the long piece on the inside that is probably about 3/4 wide and 2" high. I was giving you a possible alternative repair that meant removing the aft part of the chine log by removing the screws that go into it, and then (from the inside) carefully removing it from the plywood side and bottom from the blue box area all the way back to the transom. A new piece could then be fashioned out of proper wood used for boat building and then the new piece would be installed with adhesive and by replacing all the screws that were earlier removed. Where the new piece meets the original chine log, you could make use of a scarf joint to connect them. The plywood panels for the side and bottom would stay in place.

    Why did I propose this fix? I'm concerned that the chine log in the boat has rot in it and the screws aren't holding. I can't know for sure though because only you can check the condition of the chine log and if the screws would be going into sound, solid wood. If things are solid and in good condition, a replacement wouldn't be necessary.

    I once learned about a boat from the '50s that appeared in good condition and a man "restored" it and painted it and it looked great. Everything seemed fine, but the first time he took the boat out and got it up to speed, things failed and the bottom ply got loose and serious leaks ensued. The boat didn't sink though, and the man and boat made it back to dry land and the trailer. The man took his boat to a professional boat builder and the boat was turned over and worked on. The aft half of the plywood bottom was removed, wood replaced and repaired where necessary, and then a new plywood bottom put on. The next time the man took the boat out, all was well and the boat turned out to be one of his treasures. I tend to be rather cautious about these types of things, but I'm hoping my help might help you avoid a bad day of serious leaks and being glad to have made it back to the boat ramp with dry clothes on. Just make sure things are solid and structurally sound.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Monadnock, NH, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    Okay! I've cleaned out the entire length of the chine joint with a circ saw which gave a me chance while the screws were out to really inspect the chine log in question - it looks just fine! It's not discolored and I poked around at it with a dental pick and seems to be solid. I checked both port and starboard chines.

    I did discover in my peeking around though that it looks like the old bronze screws that keep the bottom ply planks on were screwed up into the 1/4" ply hull sides... see pic for reference. I know nothing about buiding boats but this seems wrong to me, shouldn't they be screwed into the chine log?? Also, all the screws I pulled out holding the bottom on look to be old #6 screws about 7/8" long. I'll be replacing these with 1 1/4" #8 where I can and 3/4" (driven a bit deeper) closer to the stern where they are biting into the smaller dimension of the chine.

    I'm waiting on fresh bronze screws to arrive next week before I can go ahead and start putting the boat back together.

    CC NEXT

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Repairing a 1956 Chris Craft Barracuda Kit Boat

    You're right to think that the planking screws should be set into the chine log and not the plywood. The fact that the screws were into the ply and not the chine goes a long way in explaining why things got messed up. Also, #6 screws are too small in my opinion. Going with #8 screws versus #6 is good. A common screw size for planking on a 1/4" thick plywood panel is a #8 that is 3/4" long. When you put in the #8 screws, try to get the head of the screw set just below the surface of the ply so that you can cover it with a small amount of faring compound. Careful not to get the screw too deep though because you don't have a lot of wood to work with as the ply is only 1/4" thick.

    Your picture of the chine is confusing to me because of the shadows and the angle. Do you know what type of wood the chine log is made from?

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