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Thread: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

  1. #806
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    I hear you Bruce, and thanks for the thought.
    I'm keen to keep the profile. A vertical window would require some kind of box. For air something that could open would be ideal, but it would probably leak and the whole point is defeated.

    There are inexpensive boat windscreen wipers if it is a real drag.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  2. #807
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Poo box;

    No Y valve at the T join for the drain/pump outlet.
    Reading a few forums where DIY poo boxes are discussed, nobody sees an advantage in one there, and it appears to be the valve most likely to fail.
    The entire system is 1" - but pump outs seem to need 38mm. So just under the deck i'll add a reducer 38mm to 25mm, and fit a 38mm deck fitting.
    The breather line will be clear plastic so i can get a visual for when i need to escape the heads....

    IMG_8453.jpg

    I went with an inspection hatch. Mostly because final assemble requires me to get my hand inside.
    The alternative is to goop it all up, finish the box, fill it with water and potentially find i have to break in to reseal a fitting.

    IMG_8450.jpg

    Inside got multiple coats of epoxy. I was going to paint it with an epoxy primer i have but i can't see the point.

    IMG_8449.jpg

    Getting a decent fillet onto the inside top corners, under the lid, is a challenge. I opted for copious amounts of thick epoxy and squished it down.

    IMG_8452.jpg

    The filets are not for strength. It shouldn't have to deal with much in the way of force and the box for the most part has a frame around the inside.
    The fillets are for sealing the corners - leak proof is a priority! I used 417 fairing filler cause i have a small mountain of it.

    I'll epoxy a few pieces of 20mm thick, by 60mm or so, pieces around the outside. This will give me some meat to screw fittings to, for mounting. Bottom and maybe the two sides.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  3. #808
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    I thought i had photo's but no.
    I assembled my forestay with the roller furler i bought on ebay.
    A thought struck me; The foils are aluminum extrusion. The joiners between the foils (there's six joins over 11m) were destroyed getting the unit off the old stay. The inserts that bridge the join are intact. (The whole unit is is in good condition). So i've tapped the extrusion for M5 grub screws 50mm or 600 from the end. These press in against the insert that bridges the foil joins internally. At 5mm deep screws they bury themselves just enough to have no chafe. Thing is the grub screws are SS 316, and I've got a niggly concern about galvanic corrosion.

    I can't find aluminum grub screws anywhere on the Oz interwebs. There's a team in the UK that do them.
    But reading up on it, the risk appears to be small.

    Apparently, once the area of the aluminum is 10times or greater than the area of the SS, the risk is small. Other way round (alloy screw in a SS fitting) and yer buggered.
    Another thought is that this system is designed to fit to a SS rope (forestay)......


    Anyway - just another thing to worry about.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  4. #809
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Made up three beams for the doghouse roof.
    two for underneath/inside, the forward edge and the center, and one for outside/on top - the aftermost edge, it will also serve as a hand hold.

    IMG_8448.jpg

    IMG_8451.jpg

    Oversized at the moment. Wil run them through the thicknesser to clean them up and have them ready to go.
    These will serve as the lions share of the strengthening for the roof. Along with two layers of 6mm ply (if i can find any!).
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  5. #810
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Nice work Trev’, good to see a start on the cabin. Toilet system looks like a nice and simple setup, 'couple fo questions though: Are you going to still have a direct toilet to overboard discharge as well and, if so, will you just use the same overboard through-hull? Or will it all go through the tank? Will you have a shut off valve to close the tank from going overboard? I’m wondering without a valve at the the T join for the drain/pump outlet how do you stop the pump out from just sucking up sea water? Or do you do that by shutting off the through-hull seacock?

    Where does the tank sit in relation to the waterline? The bottom of mine was just below the waterline so would have needed a non return valve in the discharge overboard and they do tend to fail. I don’t see such a risk with Y valves failing as they’re much easier to maintain and check.

    You might consider including an odour filter in your vent line:
    https://www.vetus.com/en/waste-water-systems/no-smell-filters-for-waste-tanks.html





    Larks

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  6. #811
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Nice work Trev’, good to see a start on the cabin. Toilet system looks like a nice and simple setup, 'couple fo questions though: Are you going to still have a direct toilet to overboard discharge as well and, if so, will you just use the same overboard through-hull? Or will it all go through the tank? Will you have a shut off valve to close the tank from going overboard? I’m wondering without a valve at the the T join for the drain/pump outlet how do you stop the pump out from just sucking up sea water? Or do you do that by shutting off the through-hull seacock?

    Where does the tank sit in relation to the waterline? The bottom of mine was just below the waterline so would have needed a non return valve in the discharge overboard and they do tend to fail. I don’t see such a risk with Y valves failing as they’re much easier to maintain and check.

    You might consider including an odour filter in your vent line:
    https://www.vetus.com/en/waste-water-systems/no-smell-filters-for-waste-tanks.html


    Hey Larks,

    Yes - i will retain the existing through-hull for overboard discharge. No - the head won't have a direct line overboard. The Y valve is normally installed after the head: you select either: to the tank, or overboard. This gives you contingency, if the tank blocks you just go overboard. But you need an additional T join because both your head and your tank have hoses to the through-hull.

    In my case, the head always goes to the tank and i am either keeping it, or discharging it. I could come unstuck if there's a blockage in the system. This will need regular checking, and plenty of fiber. The only other risk is leaks from holding liquid as there will always be something passing through the tank. Both of these have the potential for a messy situation. The great benefit is simplicity. Fewer joins, fewer bottle necks, fewer corners - fewer chances for blockage.

    If you recall the little prince, there's the boa constrictor that swallowed the elephant. My system is like that - its a continuous line (self vented) with a bulge in the middle called a tank. Just before it joins the hull there's a spur to a deck fitting.

    The through-hull valve would be shut during pump out. The material would gravity feed down into the pipe and then get sucked up, and the vacuum relieved via the breather (hopefully a half inch breather can cope with a 1" pipe).

    What could happen, if the breather can't cope, other than an implosion of the tank, is any water in the bowl could be sucked through the macerator. If there is no danger of damaging the mascerator - then this is no problem at all - infact, its probably beneficial. A positive side effect of pumping out is the entire system, except the through hull, will get a full flush under suction. Positive that is until the whole thing squishes.

    Just another thing to worry about

    My tank is almost against the deck. The bottom of the tank will be 300 to 400 above the waterline. I have a Tru-desgn 1" non-return valve i was considering using, but i think the material will be too thick for it - i think it'll clog all the time. It also needs some force to action, simply gravity draining won't push through it i think.

    Odour filter, the way I'm building it would allow for the retro fit of a system like that very easily. At the moment i'm thinking i'll have about 300mm of tube between the tank and the hull. It should breath out directly. My reading suggests the best solution to smell is a well ventilated tank. Suggestions are for a 38mm breathing hose - which i think is very large, the contents would splash out through that very easily. Also, vent through the hull, not the deck!!
    Last edited by gypsie; 09-27-2021 at 11:51 PM.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  7. #812
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    I thought i had photo's but no.
    I assembled my forestay with the roller furler i bought on ebay.
    A thought struck me; The foils are aluminum extrusion. The joiners between the foils (there's six joins over 11m) were destroyed getting the unit off the old stay. The inserts that bridge the join are intact. (The whole unit is is in good condition). So i've tapped the extrusion for M5 grub screws 50mm or 600 from the end. These press in against the insert that bridges the foil joins internally. At 5mm deep screws they bury themselves just enough to have no chafe. Thing is the grub screws are SS 316, and I've got a niggly concern about galvanic corrosion.

    I can't find aluminum grub screws anywhere on the Oz interwebs. There's a team in the UK that do them.
    But reading up on it, the risk appears to be small.

    Apparently, once the area of the aluminum is 10times or greater than the area of the SS, the risk is small. Other way round (alloy screw in a SS fitting) and yer buggered.
    Another thought is that this system is designed to fit to a SS rope (forestay)......


    Anyway - just another thing to worry about.
    Use Monel rivets if you can get rivets in there. Otherwise, order some Monel grub screws. That way you won't need to worry about galvanic issues.
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  8. #813
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Something i have thought about; I recently purchased an inflatable tender and i bought an electric air pump for it.
    If i open the through hull, and nothing moves, i can plug the air pump into the breather and create a force pressure inside the tank.

    The air pump can generate up to 20 atmospheres!; it goes to about 2 atmospheres on a high volume pump, and then it switches to a high pressure pump for the rest. There's a distinct change in the sound when it changes over - easy to monitor. The high pressure also works very slowly, so nothing would happen rapidly.

    The unit has a funnel shaped fitting that should seal well in the breather. I'm sure i probably couldn't hold it in, by hand, to the point where it would blow out fittings or seals. Just gives me a fairly gentle tool as a plan A.

    I think my biggest danger is a blockage at the tank/drain hose join. That'll be where it goes wrong. Or at the head itself, as usual.

    An inline valve just after the head, below the waterline of the bowl, might be useful...... (note to self).
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  9. #814
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Thanks Rick - do you know a supplier for monel grub screws? Sounds like a custom job?

    I ordered some nylon grub screws. I'm not sure they'll generate the clamping pressure, but i'll check them out. It really doesn't need very much, there isn't much (any) force pulling the foils apart.

    I'm really surprised aluminum grub screws are hard to find. you'd think the airline industry or race cars would require them regularly....

    I wonder - just rod and an M5 die. Grind a slot for a slotted screw driver into the head.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  10. #815
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Have a chat to your rigger about the grub screws, as to what they use.
    I'm pretty sure they still use locktight otherwise I'd say use tefgel to stop the corrosion.
    As a sailmaker I'd recommend pulling your genoa down a couple of times a year.
    This usually shows up any movement in the grub screw either pocking out of the screw hole or letting the extrusions move which causes wear on the luff tape of the sail.
    I've had the unfortunate experience a few time with a head swivel that wont come down due to a lost or loose grub screw. climbing the rig to fix isn't fun! or worse case the furler needs to come down to fix.

  11. #816
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Thanks Rick - do you know a supplier for monel grub screws? Sounds like a custom job?

    I ordered some nylon grub screws. I'm not sure they'll generate the clamping pressure, but i'll check them out. It really doesn't need very much, there isn't much (any) force pulling the foils apart.

    I'm really surprised aluminum grub screws are hard to find. you'd think the airline industry or race cars would require them regularly....

    I wonder - just rod and an M5 die. Grind a slot for a slotted screw driver into the head.
    I just looked them up on the internet - Monel grub screws There seem to be plenty of suppliers. If you can't actually get them, you can use SS with Tefgel or Duralac as James suggests but I think Monel (with Loctite) would be best if you can get them.
    Rick

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  12. #817
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by James Chilman View Post
    Have a chat to your rigger about the grub screws, as to what they use.
    I'm pretty sure they still use locktight otherwise I'd say use tefgel to stop the corrosion.
    As a sailmaker I'd recommend pulling your genoa down a couple of times a year.
    This usually shows up any movement in the grub screw either pocking out of the screw hole or letting the extrusions move which causes wear on the luff tape of the sail.
    I've had the unfortunate experience a few time with a head swivel that wont come down due to a lost or loose grub screw. climbing the rig to fix isn't fun! or worse case the furler needs to come down to fix.
    Thanks for that input James, I'll follow up on that.
    I'm having a new foresail made for it - I'll ask the sailmaker in Huskisson about it.
    Cheers
    T
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  13. #818
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Both my new Profurl C420 got delivered with SS grub-screws for the assembly. I installed them with Duralac to prevent corrosion and I'm pretty sure I tightened the grub-screws properly. However, the sails were on there for some passages and then for a while in the boatyard, furled up. When preparing to take off my masts the genny came down easily, the jib got stuck somewhere midway. I had to find someone to let me slide down along the forestay of the jib to sort it out ... it was a grub-screw come loose. Not sure what I'm gonna do when the spars go up again. Locktite - as far as I know - doesn't prevent corrosion. I guess James's idea about taking the sails off at least once a year and inspecting the furlers will have to be with what I'll end up with. Strange enough I don't see others doing this regularly. Sure, it was only one single grub-screw and maybe I missed out tightening it like the other ones when I assembled the system, who knows?
    fair winds, Dody
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  14. #819
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Both my new Profurl C420 got delivered with SS grub-screws for the assembly. I installed them with Duralac to prevent corrosion and I'm pretty sure I tightened the grub-screws properly. However, the sails were on there for some passages and then for a while in the boatyard, furled up. When preparing to take off my masts the genny came down easily, the jib got stuck somewhere midway. I had to find someone to let me slide down along the forestay of the jib to sort it out ... it was a grub-screw come loose. Not sure what I'm gonna do when the spars go up again. Locktite - as far as I know - doesn't prevent corrosion. I guess James's idea about taking the sails off at least once a year and inspecting the furlers will have to be with what I'll end up with. Strange enough I don't see others doing this regularly. Sure, it was only one single grub-screw and maybe I missed out tightening it like the other ones when I assembled the system, who knows?
    Threadlockers, such as Locktite threadlockers, are actually intended to both seal the thread to prevent corrosion and to lock it.
    Larks

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  15. #820
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    I got a Locktite gel that coated the screws fully, including the tip that bites down on the internal spigot.
    I assembled the whole lot but forgot to take any pictures.....

    The swage-less fitting for the bottom of the stay is a bit intimidating. Seems simple....
    I covered it in sikaflex before final clamping down. Not sure if this is recommended or not, the old fitting was gooped up when i disassembled it, and i can't see any harm.

    The threaded parts went all the way home, with a bit of effort on the spanners. Can it be that simple?
    At least the halyard will always have tension on it, so there's always a contingency.

    Pullpit seat in place.
    When i screwed it on it twisted the head off a screw - had to bring it home and will drill out the screw, plug and try again. Iron bark is tough!

    IMG_8461.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  16. #821
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Doghouse - I really should have done a seperate thread on this.

    Anyhoo - in summary, got my measurements pretty wrong. But not so wrong i can't recover. Somehow the sides are about 80mm out. Also, a simple measurement you'd think, the forward face is about 100mm too wide at the bottom.

    Process - first off, getting the boards up there.

    IMG_8463.jpg

    IMG_8464.jpg

    Then put the jigsaw together.

    IMG_8465.jpg

    Which took no time at all really.

    IMG_8466.jpg

    IMG_8467.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  17. #822
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    You can see where my measurements went a bit askew.

    IMG_8468.jpg

    Also, the bottom edge of the sides, as a result, is canting down as it goes aft.

    IMG_8471.jpg

    IMG_8472.jpg

    I decided, i'll lift the back edge by 80mm to match the front.
    As is, there's only about 300 over the hatchway to crawl under to get to the saloon.

    I'd really like to avoid a hatch on the dodger - complication and possible source of leaks. It would defeat the whole exercise.

    Lifting the back 80mm, as opposed to dropping the front, gives me close to 400.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  18. #823
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    I lifted the back and started to joggle off marks.

    IMG_8473.jpg

    Went round and marked off - all pretty safe and simple i think.

    IMG_8475.jpg

    raised up, here's the view from inside.
    I'm pretty happy.

    IMG_8480.jpg

    Standing, got a very comfortable view forward.

    IMG_8481.jpg

    I forgot to mention, another pressure on not going too high is the height of the boom. I measured it ages ago and recall that i have more than 500mm between the top of the hatch and the bottom of the boom.
    This is using about 450mm of that. I should have 100mm clearance - but i can't check till its rigged...... It won't be rigged till its back in the water, and back in the water is a busturd of a place to construct a hard dodger. So I'm playing safe.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  19. #824
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Lifted, it looks like this.

    IMG_8484.jpg

    Its a bit of a beast. Its not as discrete as i'd hope, but its okay.

    IMG_8485.jpg

    I thought about maybe a plumb face to the front, but nah.
    For something thats only about 400 high its got a lot of physical presence. Maybe it just sticks out like a sore thumb cause its so unusual to see it on the boat.

    IMG_8486.jpg

    This one is a bit weird looking cause of the wide angle on the camera i think. Makes the aft sections look enormously long.

    IMG_8488.jpg

    I will proceed.
    I got some ply - from Bunnings. Last bits of ply in the world i think.
    It has a BS standard which i know means almost nothing. But it looks okay along the edges. No voids that i can see, and the faces are fine. I'm an enthusiastic user of CPES anyway.Its a lighter colour than i'd have liked.
    Sides will be 9mm and the rof will be 2 layers of 6mm.

    I will frame the inside and have laminated up three curved beams for the roof. It'll be strong.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  20. #825
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    This looks really good to me. The model serves two purposes. Firstly, you see how it looks and then make adjustments accordingly. Secondly, you have a base to spile off for the final unit. Just make sure that nothing on your model is bent, twisted or under pressure, as this'll affect your spiking greatly.

    I have teak seats on Masina's pushpit. They're unfinished and just fine in that very exposed position.
    Rick

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  21. #826
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    In other news i started on my toe rail.
    I thought it would be a days work - i now think it'll be more like four, with one down.

    the rail will be made of three parts. A 5mm thick strip along the inside edge. A 10mm by 35mm strip along the outside edge, and a cap of 15mm high by about 45mm wide.

    Gluing on the inside edge. Screws every 500mm, and a clamp inbetween each screw, plus a few more in recalcitrant spots.

    IMG_8489.jpg

    And port side.

    IMG_8491.jpg

    I made a kayak years ago and bought a pile of 2" G-Clamps from the dollar shop.
    They are the handiest little things.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  22. #827
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    The inside strips were prepared, but it still took a few hours.

    Onto the outside strip.
    Really picks out the sheer.

    IMG_8492.jpg

    IMG_8494.jpg

    I am putting a couple of fittings back on the bow. The boat had a fishermans anchor when i got it, that i swapped out for a plough. I really liked the fisherman, it looked nice and salty.
    The fittings are to carry that anchor. They need a slot in the toe rail.

    The cap will cover this and the fitting will slide into the resultant letter box.

    IMG_8493.jpg

    IMG_8495.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  23. #828
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    The cap was a bit of a wrestle.

    IMG_8496.jpg

    Starboard side, i started aft and worked my way forward. The aft section of the rail is almost straight for about a meter. I thought it'd be good to get a toe hold and then start forcing the bend in.
    For the port side i started in the middle and worked my way to the extremes. A much better solution.

    IMG_8497.jpg

    The toe rail I'm wrapping is not quite even all the way along. A result of glassing the hull.
    So there's some tidying up to be done.

    Here you can see the outside side piece protrudes by 3mm or 4mm.

    IMG_8498.jpg

    The plan is the screw in place (done), let the timber get used to it for a week or so.
    Release it all and then reattach with really thick epoxy to fill all those gaps. The outside strip also needs clamping up to the cap in spots. I'll need every clamp.

    Once the epoxy is gone off I'll remove all the screws, drill out the holes and plug - with plugs epoxied in. So there'll be no metal holding the rail on.

    Here's my system for getting the twist in the cap at the forward sections. Just the weight of the quick clamp.

    IMG_8499.jpg

    One from the deck once assembled.

    IMG_8500.jpg

    It makes a really big difference to the look and feel of the boat.\
    I thought it'd be more substantial than it is, but its just right i think.

    There's a bit of fairing and tidying up to do on it. All straight forward, but time consuming.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  24. #829
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    This looks really good to me. The model serves two purposes. Firstly, you see how it looks and then make adjustments accordingly. Secondly, you have a base to spile off for the final unit. Just make sure that nothing on your model is bent, twisted or under pressure, as this'll affect your spiking greatly.

    I have teak seats on Masina's pushpit. They're unfinished and just fine in that very exposed position.
    Thanks Rick - it does look good. A bit of a leap from nothing to that, takes a bit of getting used to.

    My bright work is in desperate need of attention.
    It was covered in a PU varnish when i got it - and its impossible to touch up. Slowly its been flaking off bit by bit and i've been applying traditional varnish to the exposed bits.
    now most of the PU varnish is off, i think i can finally get rid of the last of it.

    I was thinking of oiling the toe rail. I'm wondering if i just go oil all round on all the bright work on deck.
    Oil is so much easier to apply and upkeep than varnish.

    Do you have experience with this?
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  25. #830
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Looking good Trevor ...the dodger and the toerail. What is the capping timber for the toerail?
    PeterW

  26. #831
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWidders View Post
    Looking good Trevor ...the dodger and the toerail. What is the capping timber for the toerail?
    Thanks Peter,

    I'm using Marri from WA.
    Its a tough hardwood. A bit of an experiment, but i'm confident. It is a little prone to splintering at sharp edges, but i've routered all the extreme edges to 8mm radius. When its glued up i'll give it a thorough sanding and i think it should be good. Its a lovely golden colour that reddens up when its wet out with oil.

    The boat is a bit of a pick and mix of timbers, but i'm using colour as the guiding principal rather than type. Obviously marine compatible as well.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Finishing brightwork. I really think there are only two choices. One is Sikkens Cetol. It's more of an oil than a varnish. It lasts quite well and touching up/recoating is easy as no sanding is required. The other option is more involved and more expensive. That's Awlwood. I haven't tried Awlwood yet but I've only heard good reports about it. No other varnish will last more than 6 months under the sun. Awlwood is reported to last about 5 years. For toerails etc., I'd use Cetol or paint them, unless they're teak. For cabinsides etc., I'd try Awlwood.

    Many people recommend putting epoxy on timber then varnishing. That works well if the area gets no sun. For areas that get sun, it's a disaster. The sun discolours the epoxy through the varnish and you're left with horrible blotches.
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull



    Looks good Trev’. Are you still going to add a bit of a brow forward? I wonder if a bit more of a curve along the aft overhang, sort of matching the curve of the transom, and a bit of shape to the aft end of the side pieces might soften it up a bit?
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  29. #834
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Looks good to me. Once it's installed nobody is going to think it's an add-on...except us of course....

  30. #835
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Thanks WW - I think It is growing on me the more i look at it.

    Larks - Yes to the brow, thinking 100 out the front and 40 down the sides.

    The overhang into the cockpit; yeah i've been mulling that kind of thing over. Problem is the roof is quite low - so its a bit of a crawl to get in and out. A convex curve out into the cockpit would make this worse - a concave curve, back over the hatch, would improve the situation but you lose some of the benefit of the dodger. Ultimately a small hatch, or removable/hinged section is possibly a way to go - but it adds complexity and takes from the lines. A really simple solution; i could cut out a rectangle, add coaming to it and make a simple box that fits over that - with some means of holding it in place in a blow.

    Curvy sides - yeah, that's possible - just got to settle on a shape and draw it up to check it out. I think i want to add hand holds to the sides, possibly just cut a slot maybe 250 long, 40 deep...... They wont be all that practical as the sides are quite low. Thinking it through, they might encourage someone to hang onto them when the boat lists - I'm not sure if the build would take the weight of a human being thrown across the cockpit..... (Note to self: Strong hanging knees in those aft corners!! And - bolt to the cabin top - not just epoxy fillets).
    Those slots might be the better option for a hand hold on the roof edge - i was thinking of adding a brace along there. Hmmm - i have an idea...
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  31. #836
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Toe rail is on and sanded back, holes plugged etc...
    She came up okay. I do rely on the gap filling qualities of epoxy - so not furniture grade workmanship.

    IMG_8514.jpg

    My phone broke down so back to the old phone for a little while - hence crappy images for a day or two.

    Gave the rail a further sanding with 240 to mop up the roughness and temper those scratches from the flap disk and grinder.
    Cetol finish - thanks for the recommendation Rick. Easy to use all round. Pity the yard is so bloody dusty and windy...! arrrrgh! Even the cetol collects bits.

    IMG_8268.jpg

    In that picture, the top section of the rail is actually the riser for the jib track. its 10mm high and about 20mm wide. The track sits on it and forms a kind of 'T' section - the car for the jib sheath block travels along it.
    Last edited by gypsie; 11-03-2021 at 05:49 PM.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  32. #837
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Putting more bits on, pushpit and pullpit.

    IMG_8306.jpg

    Also replaced the old fishermans anchor brackets.
    Just peeking up behind the fisherman you can see the thumb cleat fixed to the top of the toe rail.

    IMG_8284.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    The few months of neglect during the hard lockdown played havoc on the woodwork.
    I had given it a cursory sanding and a coat of varnish, just as a modicom of protection - with the ionthention of getting back to it pretty soon after. One coat of varnish wasn't enough for 3 or 4 months.

    I also have hated the tenacity of the PU varnish that was used 9before my time) on the brightwork rails along the cabin top. It was failing in patches and the rest was impossible to sand.

    I took into the PU with a heat gun. worked pretty well once i got the technique going. Trick was to use a sharp beveled scraper - the the ones with the flat leading edge.
    around the cockpit coaming, old fashioned elbow grease (and an RO sander...)

    after sanding.
    IMG_8302.jpg

    After - using cetol instead of varnish.
    IMG_8304.jpg

    The fir along the cabin top is thirsty. it'll be a four and probably fifth coat i think.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  34. #839
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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    Brought the latest edition of the dodger down for a trial fit.
    Really close to the final lines.

    IMG_8296.jpg

    IMG_8297.jpg

    IMG_8298.jpg

    IMG_8299.jpg
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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    Default Re: Fiberglass Sheathing a 1962 Carvel Hull

    The dodger looks great - belongs.

    Every Seabird I've seen has those beautiful, big stantion bases. Very lucky to have those!
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

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