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Thread: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I love the coin, and you are making good headway. She looks nice.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Nah.....you’re just putting up paintings now Phill.....




    that’s glorious!!!
    Larks

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  3. #73
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Nah.....you’re just putting up paintings now Phill.....




    that’s glorious!!!
    It's really hard to take a bad photo at Panatana Rivulet, it's just a magic little spot.
    After we mucked around with the boat for a bit we all went for a row up the creek, it was perfectly quiet and still
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    So finally we had a good high tide at a decent hour yesterday so with a group of family members and newly found friends we were able to pump Ipacia out, cut the very old ropes and tow her across to the waiting trailer.
    Despite all my concerns it went like clockwork, I'm still amazed at how the local wooden boat guys were so incredibly helpful and even trusting enough to lend me their trailer.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    She was then slowly but safely delivered to our block
    Sadly my daughter in the picture was in tears that night, absolutely heartbroken that we wouldn't be rowing out to work on the boat any more, I promised that we would still take the dinghy for trips up the creek but apparently that's not as much fun as actually working on an old boat in the middle of a creek, I think I've done something right somewhere
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  6. #76
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    There are some wonderful people in this world & the wooden boat community seems especially blessed.

    Fantastic that she's home!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Looks like your daughter may be taking ownership Phill........must be a very nice feeling
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Looks like your daughter may be taking ownership Phill........must be a very nice feeling
    I shouldn't be surprised, I look back over the pictures of the min tug build and she was always there with me

    Phill

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    So finally we had a good high tide at a decent hour yesterday so with a group of family members and newly found friends we were able to pump Ipacia out, cut the very old ropes and tow her across to the waiting trailer.
    Despite all my concerns it went like clockwork, I'm still amazed at how the local wooden boat guys were so incredibly helpful and even trusting enough to lend me their trailer.
    Very well done that man.

    You are going to need to be clever with your colour scheme to make that pillbox of a cabin fade from view.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  10. #80
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    [QUOTE=Peerie Maa;6232752]Very well done that man.

    You are going to need to be clever with your colour scheme to make that pillbox of a cabin fade from view.

    It's actually growing on me however If you have any ideas/sketches of how to give her a fresh cabin with similar room but better looks please share them.

    Phill

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    [QUOTE=mermod;6232762]
    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Very well done that man.

    You are going to need to be clever with your colour scheme to make that pillbox of a cabin fade from view.

    It's actually growing on me however If you have any ideas/sketches of how to give her a fresh cabin with similar room but better looks please share them.

    Phill
    Room, or headroom?
    It all depends on how you want to use her. A boat that size I would go for sitting headroom, with may be a clerestory or trunk for moving about but without full standing headroom. there were lots of images of the class on 't web, may be blag a visit to a couple to see how the feel and how they work?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  12. #82
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Hey this is just GREAT seeing her like this !
    Coffe tastes better this morning even this far away !

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I actually quite like the coachroof! I think it resolves quite nicely.

    Cheers -- George
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    A C Grayling

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Phill, is the truck ( ute ) in post #74 yours ? Any details - that model is not, I believe, available to us here.




    Rick

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    The decision on whether to keep the cabin, should be made by your children.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    A (meaningless?) vote to keep it. It's part of her charm.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Hwyl View Post
    The decision on whether to keep the cabin, should be made by your children.
    This really is what matters most, my wife loves it and the kids love it so really that's the end of the discussion

    Phill

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    [QUOTE=hawkeye54;6232898]Phill, is the truck ( ute ) in post #74 yours ? Any details - that model is not, I believe, available to us here.

    The ute belongs to my awesome nephew, I married into a farming family so turning up with anything other than a Toyota is out of the question
    Our family car is a Hilux SR5, 2015 model (pre DPF filter) all I know about the pictured ute is that it's a diesel 6 cylinder Landcruiser, he is doing an apprenticeship at the local Toyota dealership so he should know whats best, he waited quite some time until this one came up second hand on the mainland.
    I asked him to tow it as he has more suitable off road tyres than us and the extra cylinders help too that and the guy can reverse trailers in his sleep
    If you have any more specific questions PM me and i'll shoot him a message he's always happy to talk about his ute

    Phill

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    This really is what matters most, my wife loves it and the kids love it so really that's the end of the discussion

    Phill
    and ‘very pleased to hear it Phill
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  20. #90
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I know its a bit early for this, but the profile makes me think it might suit a Lego colour scheme. I like her chunky charm.
    Money may not buy happiness, but it can buy a boat that will pull right up next to it!

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    There is however one change that needs to be made, that bent bowsprit, friends and family all comment on how odd it looks.

    Phill

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    That Land Cruiser is a 70 series, made from 84 to now.

    The photo's in post #75 I think shows the original hull.
    The third photo of this post shows the stem is laminated, with the inner layer having a butt join showing just below the second blue belting.
    The strake just below that butt joint sweeps back to the split in the transom in a fabulous sheerline.
    The rudder support post is also scarfed just below this line.
    If you removed everything above that you would have a completely different boat.
    Sitting headroom for the kids maybe!
    I couldn't find any photo's of Lizzie in Wellington that showed similar clues to her diminutive self under the later additions.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    That Land Cruiser is a 70 series, made from 84 to now.

    The photo's in post #75 I think shows the original hull.
    The third photo of this post shows the stem is laminated, with the inner layer having a butt join showing just below the second blue belting.
    The strake just below that butt joint sweeps back to the split in the transom in a fabulous sheerline.
    The rudder support post is also scarfed just below this line.
    If you removed everything above that you would have a completely different boat.
    Sitting headroom for the kids maybe!
    I couldn't find any photo's of Lizzie in Wellington that showed similar clues to her diminutive self under the later additions.
    That's a keen eye you have there Slacko, it all becomes clear when you pick out those little details
    I'm nowhere near being ready to start but I did find this very interesting article on sheathing a tired old hull which makes a whole lot of sense....https://www.woodenboat.com/sheathing-tired-old-hull

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    That's a keen eye you have there Slacko, it all becomes clear when you pick out those little details
    I'm nowhere near being ready to start but I did find this very interesting article on sheathing a tired old hull which makes a whole lot of sense....https://www.woodenboat.com/sheathing-tired-old-hull
    That is what the Carrs did with Curlew, carried out in NZ with kauri.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  25. #95
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    A few things I've been wondering about......I'm not convinced she is still symmetrical, is there a recognised way of checking this? I'm thinking a template of the good side which I can then spin around on the centreline to see how close it is, does this sound reasonable?

    Phill

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    A few things I've been wondering about......I'm not convinced she is still symmetrical, is there a recognised way of checking this? I'm thinking a template of the good side which I can then spin around on the centreline to see how close it is, does this sound reasonable?

    Phill
    The first quick check is to block her up level amidships. Either with a Utube water level from deck edge or rubbing strip or by measuring down to a level under the keel. Then you can check that the stem and stern posts are plumb vertical.
    Then string a taught line down the middle from inside the stem to inside the stern and measure out to the half breadths.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  27. #97
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    On one level does it really matter if she's not perfectly symmetrical? I'm not talking about to the point that it affects her sailing or handling, but what's a tad here and a bit there on a boat with such character and cuteness?

    "Character and cuteness", ........ That won't make you any less of a sailor, don't worry.
    Last edited by nedL; 08-06-2020 at 12:03 PM.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    On one level does it really matter if she's not perfectly symmetrical? I'm not talking about to the point that it affects her sailing or handling, but what's a tad here and a bit there on a boat with such character and cuteness?

    "Character and cuteness", ........ That won't make you any less of a sailor, don't worry.
    Exactly... A vessel does not go worse on one tack, she does better on the other.
    Carefull not to do a Leo...

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Exactly... A vessel does not go worse on one tack, she does better on the other.
    Carefull not to do a Leo...
    This ^
    i am reminded of Boadicea.


    Clinker built in 1808, then doubled over with a carvel skin. Then replanked again in carvel, so that she had a mixture of joggled timbers from her first build and "smooth" timbers fitted when replanked.
    When she was sold as a yacht she sailed differently on each tack.
    Her owners were pleased that after a total rebuild, she still sailed differently on each tack.
    So if Ipacia has lost symetry, apart from an easy to fix twist, ask your self "So what?"
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  30. #100
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Looks like I might have sourced some Macrocarpa Pine big enough for the replacement keel, a local farmer is removing a line of them from his driveway
    I'm not ready to start yet but the jobs always bouncing around in the back of my mind somewhere, I'm trying to work out the order in which to do it, I guess starting with the new keel is the way to go but do I attempt it right way up or remove the rotten wheelhouse, flip it and then do it? I guess if I'm going to either spline or diagonally plywood plank over then it needs to be upside down anyhow, (pretty much answered my own question there didn't I) but when do I attack the broken frames? they've been sistered a few times so I'd like to install as many new ones as possible, can it be done after the plywood layer and just epoxied into the hull without penetrating the skin with new fixings, or should I go frames with fixings, then roll over for the keel and hull work.
    I hope I'm explaining this correctly.

    Phill

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    Looks like I might have sourced some Macrocarpa Pine big enough for the replacement keel, a local farmer is removing a line of them from his driveway
    I'm not ready to start yet but the jobs always bouncing around in the back of my mind somewhere, I'm trying to work out the order in which to do it, I guess starting with the new keel is the way to go but do I attempt it right way up or remove the rotten wheelhouse, flip it and then do it? I guess if I'm going to either spline or diagonally plywood plank over then it needs to be upside down anyhow, (pretty much answered my own question there didn't I) but when do I attack the broken frames? they've been sistered a few times so I'd like to install as many new ones as possible, can it be done after the plywood layer and just epoxied into the hull without penetrating the skin with new fixings, or should I go frames with fixings, then roll over for the keel and hull work.
    I hope I'm explaining this correctly.

    Phill
    It may be a total pita to push and wedge slippery frame timbers in place if you glue them.
    When Curlew was doubled with a diagonal skin all fastenings and framing was overhauled first, so that they were planking over a sound hull.
    They used real wood rather than ply. No risk of sanding away ply lams when fairing.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  32. #102
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Think You're right about the frames, I was thinking ply more because if you look at some of the bow on shots she's very slab sided in places but falls to a very tight curve on the return under the hull, I'm not sure if that's intended of if some of the replacement planking over the years should have been thicker to allow for more shaping of the inner and outer faces but that's just my novice thinking.

    Phill

  33. #103
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Using genuwine tree wood can give more longevity to the frames plus a laminated frame is capable of flexing a bit. Using relatively thin stock, white oak, or its local equivalent will allow for tacking built frames in place followed by rivets to pull it all together and hold them fast to the planking. Creative fairing of the edges will give a bit of cosmetic charm to the otherwise stack of cards look. Open sealing of thin longitudinal stock will further hide the laminated look.

    As to hide the awkward look of the deck house, a lot can be done with paint as Nick's picture show with the dark green hull and the white sheer. A thin lament of varnished wood to match the after section of wood can also fool the eye. The coach roof can stay that nice coffee cream color it is now. And the sides can be either white or varnished. Note here that my own boat "Red Witch" has a raised sheer which made the boat look dumpy and awkward so we added the varnished deck house and sheer strake with a holly stripe between the two planks and a two tone rub rail. All of this plus a dark British racing green boot stripe draws the eye down and makes her look longer than she really is.
    Jay
    aka Wandering Tenor

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