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Thread: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

  1. #1
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    Default Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I was a bit reluctant to start posting about this as it's my first resto and going to be a very long haul.
    After asking a few questions elsewhere on the forum it was mentioned that a few more photos would be appreciated so why not start a whole new thread on the journey of trying to save Ipacia, an 18ft 1922 built gaff sloop.

    You know that one boat that you look out over when you and your wife have a coffee by the river? the one that just has something about it and you casually mention that someone should do something before it's too late, well that's how we ended up with Ipacia.

    I guess it was 2 or 3 years ago when we both agreed that it would be interesting to find the owner but after checking with the locals and checking rego details with Marine and Safety Tasmania we hit a dead end, the next couple of years we were busy with a few health issues and when we started spending time by the river again we found that the local vandals had worked her over, smashing the hatches and busting holes through the deck, now at this stage she had been sitting on the bottom of the very tidal Panatana Rivulet for a couple of years so it was doubtful she would be in any sort of condition for even thinking of fixing her........unless of course she was made from Huon Pine.

    Recently I had luck chasing car parts on facebook buy and sell and my wife casually mentioned that I should put a similar ad on there, low and behold I had a message from the owners wife within a few hours stating that she had told him and that he would like a chat, I promptly phoned him and found that he had a few health problems of his own and that's why he wasn't able to look after the boat anymore, we messaged back and forth after that and I sent him some photos of my mini tug build and he decided to let me have Ipacia (for a small fee) oh and it turned out she was infact made from Huon Pine

    So here's the boat the locals refer to as "the submarine"
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    And for anyone interested here's a video where you can see here in a few overhead shots.....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq_Ay5LMhEk&t=185s

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    That is a lota boat for its length.
    Have you decided to restore the current structure, or take her back in time?

    it looks as though you could justify losing that big boxy cabin top if you want to
    .
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    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 05-28-2020 at 08:04 AM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Neat boat. Good luck with the restoration!
    - Chris

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    As Nick said, she is a lot of boat for her length. Sort of a corky little thing that has a good bit of local flair. Definitely looking forward to seeing more as you dig a bit more into here.

    I wonder what sort of engine is in her. I would not summarily dismiss the engine as total scrap there seems to be a fairly good interest in small vintage inboard engines where you are, and even if the engine is not salvageable there may be usable parts on it. You would be very surprised at what sort of engines can be brought back to life. If it has stayed wet and not really dried out for a good length of time that would be better.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post

    I wonder what sort of engine is in her. I would not summarily dismiss the engine as total scrap there seems to be a fairly good interest in small vintage inboard engines where you are, and even if the engine is not salvageable there may be usable parts on it. You would be very surprised at what sort of engines can be brought back to life. If it has stayed wet and not really dried out for a good length of time that would be better.
    Drop it straight into a tank of diesel as soon as you lift it out. If there are any electrics drop them into fresh water to soak the salt out of the ends of the wires. Might not save everything but can do no harm.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    [QUOTE=Peerie Maa;6192681]That is a lota boat for its length.
    Have you decided to restore the current structure, or take her back in time?

    it looks as though you could justify losing that big boxy cabin top if you want to

    We have talked about it and are open to the idea of a re-design of the cabin, once she's in the workshop we will look at what suits, I believe she was originally completely open, I have this loose plan forming where I would like to have the mast on a tabernacle so she could be trailed so a re do of the cabin would be necessary.

    Phill

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I wonder what sort of engine is in her. I would not summarily dismiss the engine as total scrap there seems to be a fairly good interest in small vintage inboard engines where you are, and even if the engine is not salvageable there may be usable parts on it. You would be very surprised at what sort of engines can be brought back to life. If it has stayed wet and not really dried out for a good length of time that would be better.[/QUOTE]

    The current engine is an Arona either an AL 185M or AL 186M, I know this because that's what it says on the instruction manual that came with her
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I should probably mention that I did do a thorough poke around the hull before I started, the planks seemed very sound but the keel that was replaced with hardwood at some stage has suffered badly and will certainly need replacing again, it's interesting to see first hand which species of timber will stand up to the test of time and which ones fail, the hardwood floorboards we removed on the weekend were terribly rotten and a lot of the built in storage compartments were only cheap plywood.
    I knew there was one hole in the port garboard and put a temporary patch over it, I suspected there was another on the starboard side directly where she sat on the sand and after the flooring was removed and the tide came in it showed itself quite clearly so that is the next major job to be sorted before she floats enough to drag her over to the shore.
    I was surprised to find 4 large car batteries and 1 deep cycle battery twice the length of a standard battery hidden inside under the bunks, once these were removed she did infact briefly try to float which was very promising and something I needed to see to boost morale after dealing with all the crap that was waiting under those floor boards......
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    It looks like you do have your hands full, but she is quite a manageable size. And a nice little diesel! It might be gone, but certainly looks worth some reasonable effort to save it.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Phill she’s fantastic! I love her! What a heck of project to take on but wow, what a result you’ll get - I can easily see why you want to save her.

    And, personal opinion for what it’s worth, I quite like the shape of the cabin top as it is -she’d still make a nice camper/raider for Tas’ left like that.
    Larks

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    [QUOTE=Larks;6194332]Phill she’s fantastic! I love her! What a heck of project to take on but wow, what a result you’ll get - I can easily see why you want to save her.

    And, personal opinion for what it’s worth, I quite like the shape of the cabin top as it is -she’d still make a nice camper/raider for Tas’ left like that.

    Yeah there's just something about her that catches the eye

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Well, today was spent stripping out more garbage and most of the bunk framing so I could access the hull from inside, an old repair where the seams had been filled with sikaflex had let got so I filled these with a product called Water Plug which is available down here in Bunnings, basically a magic grey powder you mix with water until it's a peanut butter consistency which can then be trowelled into the open seam and sets underwater in about 3 minutes it's my new most favourite product.
    As of today she is floating but still listing heavily thank's to all those batteries I still have to remove, I don't actually own a dinghy so I have to rely on friends otherwise the batteries would have been out by now, mush easier to row them across rather than cart them through the mud.
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    The dreaded batteries (one still inside)
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    What a nice and lovely little boat she is, well done, congratulations!!!
    fair winds, Dody
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Phill she’s fantastic! I love her! What a heck of project to take on but wow, what a result you’ll get - I can easily see why you want to save her.

    And, personal opinion for what it’s worth, I quite like the shape of the cabin top as it is -she’d still make a nice camper/raider for Tas’ left like that.
    I have to say I like the superstructure and cabin tops too!!

    I hope you get to save her.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    The current engine is an Arona either an AL 185M or AL 186M, I know this because that's what it says on the instruction manual that came with her
    If it is an Arona you should prepare yourself to toss it. Originally they were Lombardini air cooled engines that Arona modified to watercooling. Arona closed the factory in the 1980's and Lombardini does not support such old models anymore.

    Can the Water Plug be easily removed afterwards? I understand it is cement based.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Rumars View Post

    Can the Water Plug be easily removed afterwards? I understand it is cement based.
    It has to be removed mechanically and can be a bit of a bugger to remove but if it’s over paint, especially old paint, it makes the job easier.

    Phill do you think you’ll be needing to replace many of those bottom planks where you have needed the WaterPlug anyway?
    Larks

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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    It has to be removed mechanically and can be a bit of a bugger to remove but if it’s over paint, especially old paint, it makes the job easier.

    Phill do you think you’ll be needing to replace many of those bottom planks where you have needed the WaterPlug anyway?
    Looks like there's 2 or 3 that could do with being replaced or maybe some decent patches scarphed in, I'm not worried about the difficulty of removing the bog, like you said, there's a lot of contamination where the sealer is so by no means is it a long term fix.

    As for the engine, after the filth I found in the bilge I'm thinking anything would be better than an old diesel, transom mount outboard would be super practical but not pretty, electric maybe? or bit the bullet and go for a nice new compact name brand diesel.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    I do have a question, the arrangement on the transom, I can't say that I've seen it before, is it to limit the travel of the rudder or is there another purpose that I'm missing?
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    ^ It puzzles me as well.
    The rudder will be severely overhung to create the prop aperture so it might have been fitted to brace a false stern post planted on, but I cannot see the need for such massive timbers.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    ^ It puzzles me as well.
    The rudder will be severely overhung to create the prop aperture so it might have been fitted to brace a false stern post planted on, but I cannot see the need for such massive timbers.
    It does make a fantastic step but I'm guessing it has a deeper meaning than just that
    I will attach a pic of the rudder also.
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Maybe that was the timber to hand, and whoever fitted them could not be bothered with thinning it.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Maybe that was the timber to hand, and whoever fitted them could not be bothered with thinning it.
    Quite possible, before being vandalised the boat had lots of artsy bits, stuff that one might think a boat should look like, one owner obviously liked dolphins, there were.......
    Dolphin Handles on the cabinets
    Dolphins on the forward cabin bulkhead (carved)
    Dolphins on the cushions
    Dolphins on the step down in the deck (carved)
    Dolphins on the front of the engine box
    Basically a whole lot of Dolphin going on
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Nothing unusual with rudder stops. Can prevent tearing your rudder and or boat apart when reversing.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    Quite possible, before being vandalised the boat had lots of artsy bits, stuff that one might think a boat should look like, one owner obviously liked dolphins, there were.......
    Dolphin Handles on the cabinets
    Dolphins on the forward cabin bulkhead (carved)
    Dolphins on the cushions
    Dolphins on the step down in the deck (carved)
    Dolphins on the front of the engine box
    Basically a whole lot of Dolphin going on
    Probably why she has seemed just as happy under the water as above it for so long....
    Larks

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  27. #27
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Probably why she has seemed just as happy under the water as above it for so long....
    Ha, never thought of that

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quirky and funky.....but lovely. Congratulations!
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Nothing unusual with rudder stops. Can prevent tearing your rudder and or boat apart when reversing.
    I'm thinking the rudder is so close to the prop, turning it more would result in tearing up the rudder, and making the rudder give a wider opening would result in a less effective rudder. I think it's a makeshift because the prop was too far back. It may be that the original rudder was smaller, that looks like a powerboat stern. She might be most comfortable motorsailing.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    It is strange that the prop looks to be out behind the transom... Doesn't make sense... to me anyhow.
    Could it be that the boat was shortened, maybe when a transom replacement was needed?

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    I do have a question, the arrangement on the transom, I can't say that I've seen it before, is it to limit the travel of the rudder or is there another purpose that I'm missing?
    It could be an anti ventilation plate, the prop is basicly behind the boat, without that piece of wood there would be nothing above it. It also braces the lower pintle for what is effectively a spade rudder.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    The way the ribs are done and the slab sides makes me think there have been another couple of planks added to the topsides at some stage.
    The line of the tops of the original ribs looking aft under the cockpit show a shapely sheerline.
    Happy to be wrong on that, but just a thought.
    Is there any sign of having had a centreboard in the bottom of the bilge?
    There is a similar sized yacht called Lizzie that was recovered from sinking and rebuilt in Wellington a few years ago. It was done with all volunteer labour.
    She was flush decked with 2 extra planks as found.

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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I'm thinking the rudder is so close to the prop, turning it more would result in tearing up the rudder, and making the rudder give a wider opening would result in a less effective rudder. I think it's a makeshift because the prop was too far back. It may be that the original rudder was smaller, that looks like a powerboat stern. She might be most comfortable motorsailing.
    This makes perfect sense when you think about it

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    The way the ribs are done and the slab sides makes me think there have been another couple of planks added to the topsides at some stage.
    The line of the tops of the original ribs looking aft under the cockpit show a shapely sheerline.
    Happy to be wrong on that, but just a thought.
    Is there any sign of having had a centreboard in the bottom of the bilge?
    There is a similar sized yacht called Lizzie that was recovered from sinking and rebuilt in Wellington a few years ago. It was done with all volunteer labour.
    She was flush decked with 2 extra planks as found.
    Definitely no sign of any centreboard but we do know the keel was replaced at one stage, I was wondering what it did for stability considering the only ballast I found was 3 bags of strategically placed gravel.
    As for extra planks, I'm waiting on extra photos of what she looked like in the past, I can certainly see why you would think the extra planks had been fitted, it would also explain why my mullet boat isn't quite as shapely as others I'v seen.
    Would you have any links or pictures of the restoration of Lizzie?
    I do have one black and white pic where she has the same lines but no cabin.....
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    Default Re: Saving Ipacia (hopefully)

    Quote Originally Posted by mermod View Post
    Definitely no sign of any centreboard but we do know the keel was replaced at one stage, I was wondering what it did for stability considering the only ballast I found was 3 bags of strategically placed gravel.
    As for extra planks, I'm waiting on extra photos of what she looked like in the past, I can certainly see why you would think the extra planks had been fitted, it would also explain why my mullet boat isn't quite as shapely as others I'v seen.
    Would you have any links or pictures of the restoration of Lizzie?
    I do have one black and white pic where she has the same lines but no cabin.....
    There are loads of mullet boat photos, and a plan showing the profile of the CB in this thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...d-Mullet-Boats referred to in post #3 above. The top of the internal keel or hog inder the silt might indicate where the cb case was removed.


    Some have the raised fordeck, others do not.

    Edited to add: On the stability issue, Mullet boats are wide for their length, like the square sterned cat boats, it is all form stability.
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 06-01-2020 at 05:53 AM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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