Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 40

Thread: Feather Pram for Kotik

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Feather Pram for Kotik

    Inspired by "Slacko" - http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...57#post6172557,

    and "Stromborg" - http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...Mara+Gaff+Yawl,

    I decided that the time had come to build that Feather Pram I've had the plans for since 2003. This will be my fourth Iain Oughtred boat, after Eun na Mara Islesburgh, Sooty Tern Trondra, and Kotik Kotik. See my thread "Kotik,Kotik, Kotik!"

    This is Steve's one. Nice, eh!


    I started about the beginning of last week, by getting out the plans and discovering that I already had enough plywood to build it, including the rudder and lee-board, so I went straight to Iain's full-sized drawings of the moulds, made half-patterns on some old posters and drew around them onto my Sooty Tern moulds. I've still got the biggest one left over.


    Then I got my old building frame down off the ceiling, set it up beside Kotik, set upthe moulds and ran battens around Iain's marks to see how they lay. No problems there, so I marked the positions more obviously, on the side nearest the gunwale. I did that on both sides of the hull.
    Then I took the moulds off again and planed the flats on the bench,

    put the moulds back on the frame, and used the battens to gauge the cuts for the bevels on both transoms.


    So here she is, as at last night. After making the saw cuts, I bevelled the transoms with a big wood rasp. There are four floors.


    Now I'll go and plank her up! I am enjoying this little project. She will fit on the roof of Kotik, but we will probably tow her more often, on sheltered waters, and carry the inflatable dinghy inside Kotik on the bigger trips.

    I had to buy a new camera in February. I haven't figured out how to put the date on the photos yet. There must be a setting, somewhere....

    I will have to do some shopping next week, online or otherwise. I try to support the local businesses.

    Stay safe!
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-07-2020 at 04:12 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Timer has started Ian

    shouldn’t be too hard to beat my time seeing as how I haven’t finished after 25 years +
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 05-07-2020 at 12:26 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    12,955

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Those are a nice wee pram. I still have Gartsides Spitfire pram as a future project, but that is not a tender......or i really need to build a bigger boat so that i could use it as one....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks, Andrew and Ian. I haven't got any more epoxy yet so I'm just cutting out the planks and nailing them on with panel pins at this stage. I will be able to go shopping next week if we go back to level 2 on the covid lockdown, as we are all hoping. Yes, Paul Gartside does interesting designs - beautiful, practical, traditional - but a bit beyond me, I think. The Spitfire looks good but I see what you mean about it being too big, at 10ft (3m), for a tender.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-07-2020 at 04:11 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    • Here is some stuff that I am copying from my Kotik thread, just to keep it all together.
      Ian

    • Andrew Donald
      Senior Member


      Join Date
      Mar 2019
      Location
      Melbourne, Australia
      Posts
      337


      Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!
      Ha ha.....I started one of those about 25 years ago hoping to finish it while my kids were little but they are 25 and 29 now, but the boat is about 2/3 done. I like to take my time. I’m betting yours is done before mine.
      are you going to do the sailing rig Ian or just a tender?
      cant get building out of your veins can you, how many boats is that in the last decade?

      Some thoughts about building for you Ian.
      - my hull is done in 4mm but it worries me a bit, wishing I’d gone for 6mm. Both for stiffness of individual planks and puncture resistance when beaching, although maybe glass inside and out could help with that?
      - have a think about doing floors straight( both athwartships and for/aft) it’ll make things a lot easier with the sole.
      - if you go with the 4mm, as I did, then perhaps one or two light frames to stiffen things up a bit, the 4mm is pretty light. The gunnels and thwarts help but the 4 is light.
      - just to add, maybe an extra floor spaced accordingly if you go with 4mm.
      - if 4mm then like you said somewhere, just go without fairing laps but fill the laps with goo. Should make for good stiffening stringers.
      - re point above, I think like Iain’s plans do, he has put in plank lines on each station, so may take some thinking to just overlap them??
      - dunno if this boat is designed for two people but the above may help for that, or my bulk!!

    • IanMilne
      Senior Member

    • Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Location
      Dunedin, New Zealand
      Posts
      666


      Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!
      Hi Andrew. Yes, I saw on Steve "Stromborg's" Eun Mara thread that you were building one, slowly.
      I will make the sailing version. Alison can make the sail. It might be fun to sail it on my own, but we won't be sailing it two-up. This will be the fourth boat since I retired. I'm pretty lucky really.
      Thanks for the good advice. Yes, I am using the 4mm ply I was going to use for a third kayak in 1982, but only built two. They were plywood versions of that yellow one. I am thinking of 'glassing it, or doubling the bottom, or both. I will just lap the planks without bevelling them, as Iain shows. Yes, my floors are straight on top.
      Cheers,
      Ian
      I'll just add to that, that the plans do allow 4mm plywood planking. That must be why the moulds are only 13" (325mm) apart.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,349

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik



    A bit of inspiration for you Ian.

    Yesterday was the first time I actually towed the pram behind Marianita. I may have been hypersensitive because it was the first time but it sure felt like a lot of drag on the boat and there was a lot of noise as the little thing was slapping around in the chop.
    https://photos.smugmug.com/Boats/Fea...G_0333-640.mp4

    It doesn't appear that the forum supports video from smugmug but the above link will take you to a 5 second clip of the action
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks for that video Steve. About what I’d expect from such a tubby little flat bottom dinghy. I like your cover. My only doubts I have is when towing in much over 15kn. I wouldn’t have any room to sail with feather on board my GS. I’m considering a folding dinghy.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Hi Steve,

    Like Andrew said, thanks for the photo and video of towing the pram. I like the cover too. She seems to be riding well, with the bow transom clear of the water. Nice looking tiller on Marianita too!

    Looking at mine so far, it does look like a short little fat thing, more like a coracle than a kayak! I like the look of it though. I wouldn't want to be towing a dinghy of any sort in over 15kn of wind. We find our cheap inflatable perfectly serviceable on our trips. We can carry it inside the boat. Of course, it doesn't look very traditional. Here's me, using a sculling draw-stroke over the bow, like a coracle, to rescue the other oar.



    I got a plan for a folding dinghy called "Origami" ages ago, but haven't built it. They have more designs now. See https://www.woodenwidget.com/ . As an aside, here's an interesting video: https://www.offcenterharbor.com/vide...-bottom-skiff/

    Back to the subject, here's mine now. The planks are all just tacked on with 40mm panel pins so far. We go from covid lockdown level 4 to level 3 on Thursday, so I will be able to buy epoxy from the local shop again. Next week will do. In the meantime, I can make the rudder and lee-board. We have just been out for our annual 'flu vaccination, done "drive through" in a car parking building. First time we've been out for more than a local walk since March. We will be allowed to go boating again in level 3, but it's getting a bit cold for that now, and Kotik is "in dock".


    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 06-16-2020 at 03:30 PM. Reason: Add photo
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Looking good Ian. The weatherboard overlaps look the same as beveled from here. I suppose you’d only be able to tell from inside anyway. Did you have to modify the plank cutting in any way, like deleting the “land” from the suggested planks.? That Woodenwidget is the one I have plans for, their Fliptail model.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,349

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Coracle is an apt description, tracking is not this little boat's strongest feature. But she scoots around the harbor ok, I have yet to put more than one person in the boat, waiting for slightly warmer day for that. I have yet to get around to making the leeboard and rudder, to be honest this thing is so small and twitchy I am concerned about fussing with the leeboard and think a little daggerboard would be better in the long run.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks Andrew and Steve, again.

    I'm glad the planks look as good as bevelled, because they are bevelled! I forgot to say this morning that although I had intended not to bevel them, I went ahead and spiled them by my usual method with a spiling batten and compass arcs, but I spiled them to the lap line, as usual, and as I progressively fitted the planks to the moulds I found them getting more difficult to fit properly as I approached the turn of the bilge. Then I realised that I should have spiled them to the edge of the previous plank, not to the lap line, (and then added the lap width), because the edge was pushing them out to the wrong angle. So then I took them all off and beveled them anyway. This afternoon I took them all off again and bevelled them better, on the bench. To bevel them evenly on the moulds would have needed fairly stiff battens set into the moulds to support the edges as I did it.

    Thanks for the performance report, Steve. You're probably right about a daggerboard. Iain's other prams have them. The case would support the thwart too. I don't mind trying a leeboard though. The oars I made for the inflatable are 4'6" long to fit in Kotik's cockpit locker, so they won't have quite as much turning moment as yours.

    Now I'll go and do another trial fit of the planks.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-12-2020 at 03:34 AM. Reason: oars
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,349

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    I don't think the plans called for it but I ended up turning a little spindle to support the thwart, a daggerboard case would do the same thing if you decided to go that way.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Good idea, Steve. The thwart arrangement looks as if it needs some support in the middle.
    I'm being a bit distracted by other stuff at the moment.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    14,302

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    That design sure tows nice. Reminds me of a "Fatty Knees" dinghy designed by Lyle Hess and has a pointy bow. Pardys had one and loved it. They row very well!
    But if you are starting from scratch, my all time favorite is the Hereshoff Dingy. And, I believe there is a whole book devoted to building one. Tows well, sails well, has enough flotation to support an outboard, is easy to build if you are handy with tools and carries gear and passengers in great form!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-14-2020 at 01:45 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Hi guys,
    While I still didn't have any epoxy I spent some more time fiddling around with the 4mm planks and then decided to go with Andrew's view that they were a bit flimsy on their own, and I didn't want to have to fibreglass them, like kayaks are, so I went out when the shops had opened and bought a nice sheet of 6mm meranti marine plywood and started again. The 4mm planks have made good spiling battens and I had previously used them for lofting my Sooty Tern, so they are not entirely wasted. I have got some more epoxy now too, so I have been back on the job. The sheet of plywood yielded the bottom panel and three more strakes, and a new stern transom, as seen here...


    and here is the present state of affairs, with the bottom panel and two more strakes glued on and the next one in dress rehearsal. The plywood clamps and brackets are leftovers from my previous efforts. When this strake is on I will glue up the new loopy tiller for Kotik, which is still as you last saw it.


    Then I will consider whether to use my remaining sheet of 4mm ply for the other four strakes (the 4mm planks I have already made probably won't fit), or to go out and buy another sheet of 6mm. Tomorrow is a holiday anyway. This is our annual Queen's Birthday Weekend.

    That will do for now.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    I’m glad you changed ply before you started gluing Ian. That would’ve been fun ungluing the 4
    probably means the difference of being able to carry you both, if you’d dare.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks for the comments, Andrew. I like the 6mm ply much better. I got the next strake glued on today, and I got the new tiller for Kotik glued up too. That was quite a big job. I'll put something on the Kotik thread about it tomorrow.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    The Feather Pram has made some progress, between interruptions. Our neighbour took out his macrocarpa hedge while we were away in February. It had grown too big for both of us. We always knew he would take it out eventually, so we saw that the time had come for a new fence. We had discussed all this several years ago, and now is as good a time for it as any. It's coming along well.
    Here are a few pics of FP.

    A contrast in styles. This is with the sheerstrake fitted but not glued yet, as I had run out of glue powder.


    We lifted her off the moulds by swinging the bow up over the stern. I cleaned up the inside with my hot air gun and a scraper.




    I got some more glue powder today, so here she is, back on the moulds and all glued up.


    I had not built a transom before, so now I have built two! The upper planks are screwed to the bow transom with permanent screws to hold the twist. The stern transom is from the end of the first sheet of plywood after I had got the bottom panel and three strakes out of it, so the grain is the "wrong" way. The bow transom is from an offcut of Kotik's 18mm rudder plywood. I have cut the rudder and leeboard for FP out of that too, but the leeboard has to be in two pieces.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Looks great Ian. Are you going to hinge the leeboard?

    Congrats to NZ for being COVID free

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks, Andrew. No, I'm not going to hinge the leeboard . My 18mm plywood offcuts aren't big enough for the whole thing in one piece, so it will have a splined joint down the middle.

    Yes, our Govt has done well in controlling Covid, along with our "team of five million", as Jacinda likes to say. Now we have to keep it that way. We're working on a vaccine too.

    I cleaned up the sheerplanks and filletted all the seams today.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Here's a bit of progress.

    The forward floor is not in the plans but I put it in anyway.


    It helped position the mast step, if nothing else.


    The thwarts etc. are recycled western red cedar. What do you call a thwart that isn't athwart? Iain calls it a bench. The one above it will be the mast partner, bolted up under the inwales when required. You have to be careful to get the cleats in the same plane as the thwarts. Here you also see the temporary strut holding the sides out to the correct width, as they sprang in a little when I took her off the moulds. I thought the tumblehome looked quite good.


    The plan has two rowing stations. You can use the midship one when rowing normally, and the forward one when you have a passenger or a load in the stern.

    My next move will be to turn her back onto the moulds to finish the outside. I will take the middle mould out, to clear the midship thwart cleats. Required parts are the keel and skeg, the rub-rails (gunwales), and the pads that the leeboard will rest on when in use. You can see them on Steve's one in the first posting here. The plan shows the keel in two layers but I will be able to steam a piece of kwila to do it in one layer.

    Keep well,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Looks very neat Ian. Maybe Steve can answer a question I’ve been wondering about the Feather. That centre thwart looks pretty light and I’ve often wondered if it’s up to the job? I’m wondering about putting a support under it.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks, Andrew. Yes, Steve did put a support post under the centre thwart. See message 12. I will do the same. I will just screw all the thwarts in so they wil be removable for maintenance, so I guess the post will have to be removable too. It might be a piece of plywood straddling the floor at that point.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Wellington, NZ
    Posts
    721

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    I glued the centre support into my rebuilt dinghy and screwed the thwarts to it so they are removeable.
    The upright looked a bit flimsy on it's own but will be fine with the thwart stopping sideways movement from breaking the glue join.
    I wasn't sure if you could steam Kwila, so I used clamps and brute force to hold it until the glue set. Nice to know you can.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks, Slacko, and welcome. Your way with the post would be fine. I might do mine that way too.
    Yes, kwila steams OK. The old rule of thumb - one hour for each inch of thickness - works well enough. The way my steamer is built, the condensate runs back into the tank and stains the water a dark purple-brown colour.

    Today I ripped an 8-foot (2.4m) kwila board (outdoor decking plank) into strips for the keel and rub-rails, steamed them for about 45 minutes and lashed them into their places on the dinghy for overnight. I could have glued them today, but chose not to.


    Any old rope will do.


    I also fiddled around with a piece of cardboard making a pattern for the pads/cleats/whatevers that the leeboard lies up against when in use. The batten clamped to the building frame is for sighting the outer edge of the cleat against to get it parallel to the centreline.


    And in my idle moments I cleaned up the new tiller for Kotik some more.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,349

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik


    Because a picture is worth a thousand words...

    The leeboard bumpers end up sticking out quite a bit. I should have been more selective when using this bit of scrap for the lower one, it has already snapped off along the grainline. At some point I will move the "singlehanded" oarlocks aft about 12", placed as designed but with my 6'-0" tall self centered u[ in the boat they are too close to me to allow for a clean oarstroke. I also end up with my feet tucked under the aft thwart to get my thighs out of the way. She is a wee little boat.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Thanks for that Steve. Perhaps I'll use some scraps of my 18 mm ply for the bumpers (that's a good name for them). I see you have an upper bumper as well.
    I will experiment wth the rowlock positions before I glue them in.
    I like your colour scheme too (as finished), by the way. I've still got plenty of Kotik paint, so mine will be white with a blue sheerstrake and light grey interior.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,349

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    The bumper size was based on the possibly faulty idea that the leeboards should be perpendicular to the DWL and parallel to the centerline of the hull. Somebody with actual knowledge of using them would know if that is true or not
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Dutch leeboards are considerably angled outwards from the pivot point, to be vertical when the boat is heeling. Their boats often have a lot of tumblehome in the sheer strake to achieve this. The board is convex on the inner side to give it some "lift" to windward. Giving the bumper a bit of toe-in might help this too. Have you used yours yet, Steve?

    I glued the keel, bilge runners and gunwales on last night.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Here are all the bits on the outside - keel, runners, rub-rails, leeboard bumpers,


    and skeg.


    Here's a photo of Kotik and Feather Pram together. I think I would have liked a bit more arch on the transom top, but never mind. We hung up the building frame again yesterday. You can see it at the top of the picture.


    Onwards....

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,349

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Dutch leeboards are considerably angled outwards from the pivot point, to be vertical when the boat is heeling. Their boats often have a lot of tumblehome in the sheer strake to achieve this. The board is convex on the inner side to give it some "lift" to windward. Giving the bumper a bit of toe-in might help this too. Have you used yours yet, Steve?

    Ian
    There is so much flare (flam? I get those two crossed sometimes) to the hull where the bumpers go that they would end up being pretty unsightly. I have the mast and sail built but haven't gotten around to making the rudder and leeboard yet. Part of it is being busy and part of is I don't know that this is particularly good boat for me, not the smallest person in world, to be sailing. She's a very small bowl and sits in the water happiest with my butt on the bench/thwart, not aft where one would sail from.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    31,900

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Kotik is such a beautiful boat.
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Nice job Ian. Where do you imagine carrying L’il Kotik?

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    708

    Default Re: Feather Pram for Kotik

    Hi Steve, Yes, you will be busy with your new house that you have built. There are probably quite a few jobs still to do.
    I'm imagining that FP would be fun to try out sailing with the leeboard on a fine day. I would sit in the middle. The sail has no boom, so that should work alright. I think the bumpers look OK when you know what they are.

    Thanks, WX. Glad you like her. It was interesting to see that steel "Tahitiana" La Chica in February, rigged as a junk schooner. See https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...3aaec4cb_b.jpg. There is a website about her too.

    Thanks, Andrew. I'm imagining that L'il Kotik (dunno about that!) will fit on the roof, upside down, on sort of roof-rack bars lashed to the handrails and the boom raised to the first reef position. But then she will probably be horribly in the way of just about everything. She also might go sideways across the foredeck. Or it might not work at all. It doesn't matter all that much. Our inflatable works well on trips away.

    Here are a couple of faded pics of Dutch boats with leeboards hanging on my workshop wall, picked up from 2nd-hand shops.




    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •