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Thread: An Ilur in Hansville

  1. #771
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    341

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    The best part of the forum is all the input from other builders. I know that if it wasn’t for all those who posted before me and shared their builds I would have had a rougher time at it. I’m fixing a chip out of the mast step and putting a little paint on the CB that got rubbed. I cut the bottom off a 5 quart oil jug for a bailer (thanks for the tips on tying down the bailer), and I adjusted the fore most trailer roller. I’m going to cut off some of the line on the fenders and move the Prussic knot on one of the main sheet blocks. After watching all of Roger Barnes vids I was surprised At how tender the Ilur was, I now remember other Ilur builders having to add some weight when solo. I think the design of the Ilur was from a French fishing boat that was always really loaded down. And Roger always has a full load when sailing. I have some 25lb bags of lead I’m going to tie down in the bilge one bag on each side next to the CB case. I hope that helps, but it also makes me a little nervous about capsizing and stillbeing able to right the boat with the added lead. The Ilur doesn’t have any ballast in the CB or keel. I ll get back on the water as soon as I help my wife with one of her projects.

  2. #772
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    580

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Quote Originally Posted by davidladd View Post
    The best part of the forum is all the input from other builders. I know that if it wasn’t for all those who posted before me and shared their builds I would have had a rougher time at it. I’m fixing a chip out of the mast step and putting a little paint on the CB that got rubbed. I cut the bottom off a 5 quart oil jug for a bailer (thanks for the tips on tying down the bailer), and I adjusted the fore most trailer roller. I’m going to cut off some of the line on the fenders and move the Prussic knot on one of the main sheet blocks. After watching all of Roger Barnes vids I was surprised At how tender the Ilur was, I now remember other Ilur builders having to add some weight when solo. I think the design of the Ilur was from a French fishing boat that was always really loaded down. And Roger always has a full load when sailing. I have some 25lb bags of lead I’m going to tie down in the bilge one bag on each side next to the CB case. I hope that helps, but it also makes me a little nervous about capsizing and stillbeing able to right the boat with the added lead. The Ilur doesn’t have any ballast in the CB or keel. I ll get back on the water as soon as I help my wife with one of her projects.
    Onwards and upwards Moriarty :-)

  3. #773
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    341

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Im ready for the next sea trials. 50lbs in the bilge, trailer adjustments, main sheet line up closer to the boom, but the main change was with the yard. I got turned on to a Youtube vid from Michael Storer on bending the sail to the yard and boom. It answered all my questions and allowed me to do a better job with the sail. Any first time lug sailer should see this vid.
    ďLugsail Rigging For the OzGoose, Rigging the Lugsail for the First TimeĒ. I finally got the sail bag for the boom/yard/sail combo. Iím making another small cleat to tie off the lazy jack line.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #774
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saco, ME
    Posts
    2,431

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Just catching up on the thread.

    Good Luck, David, with the sea trials - start with a good reef in the sail and choose your weather. The Ilur - like a lot of these boat types - will settle down when a 2nd person is aboard or some ballast is aboard - the 5 gal water jugs for camping are ok ballast because you can always empty out the seawater and refill them.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  5. #775
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    David,
    Was there any warning at all or did it just go over? Asking because the Illur is still near the top of my "dream" boat list and always assumed from the Vermont videos that it was quite hard to even purposely pull "her" over. Guess that' not always the case...


    Could you detail the cause(s) of your capsize? Too much sail up? Running line caught in something, gype or "death roll"? ( I get near one with my boomless spritsail). OR do you think it was merely the lack of ballast/load? Anything unique in causation to this particular design compared to others?

    I hadn't realized how important stores/ballast and butt weight was even in a design as relatively heavy and seaworthy as the Illur. Good for us to learn from your experience here.

    I'm trying out six gallon water jugs (on a 10.5'er_ next to see if that works as well as the dive weight(s) bag. I'd rather the ballast fall out of the boat if I ever capsize or at least be able to pull It out of the boat easily for righting. It made me nervous too to have non removable (or easily removable) ballast.

    Hope to see your boat in person one day. Did you bring it to P.T. Fest this year?
    Looking forward to your 2nd sail to see how things go!
    Cheers, DP

  6. #776
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    580

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Have you seen Roger Barnes's video (on youtube) after he capsized his Ilur? Roger has sailed a lot & made many videos which are great fun - he was caught out by a mainsheet getting trapped in an aft seat. It can happen to anyone!

    Regards Neil

  7. #777
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Quote Originally Posted by neil.henderson View Post
    Have you seen Roger Barnes's video (on youtube) after he capsized his Ilur? Roger has sailed a lot & made many videos which are great fun - he was caught out by a mainsheet getting trapped in an aft seat. It can happen to anyone!

    Regards Neil
    Wasn't sure if you were asking me or David.... but...

    The only time I came scarily close to a capsize, it was caused by exactly that. The figure 8 stop knot caught in one of the floorboard slats/slots. I keep a "hawk eye" on it now trying to always keep it in front of me where I can see it and filling in the slot with something when I sail.

    With Roger Barne's method of switching the sheeting from one stern quarter to the other, common in Brittany in the olde days, it would seem that the opportunities for this happening might come along more often if one's hawk eye is looking elsewhere as things are getting interesting?

  8. #778
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    341

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Hi DP, iíve had too many other things taking my energy lately to post. But, Iím finally getting back to a little boat work. I think the Ilur is a great boat and my capsize was all my fault. However, because it has no designed ballast, it does seem likely that without any other person or any other loads it is prudent to add some kind of ballast. Iíve added 25lbs of lead on each side of the CB case in the bilge. My sailing back ground is in larger boats. I had forgotten how important it is to be proactive in dinghy sailing. I had the full sail up and it should have been reefed. When i decided to gybe around i didnít move fast enough to the new ďwindwardĒside. When the wind gust hit the gybed sail i was trapped on the lee side with the boom and main sheet and the heel of the boat keeping me from getting to the windward side. I should have either moved sooner or sat down on the floorboards.
    i also learned that i needed a better way to bail the boat. I now have a larger bail scoop and i also wanted either a manual whale pump or an electric bilge pump. I decided to start with an electric bilge pump. I already have a battery box made with (2) 30ah Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries and iím working on a base plate to sit it on. The base plate is notched to utilize the boat design which will keep the base plate from moving much. I still have to work out how to keep the battery box itself from moving during a capsize. My plan is to mount a high flow bilge pump on a piece of wood and place it in the bilge. Iíll have a flex hose attached which i can point over the side as i switch it on. Michael Storerís website has a video of a version of this.
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  9. #779
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    580

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    If you look at one of Roger Barnes's videos where he talks about the internal layout of his Ilur you will see that he has a large battery which powers his navigation device and his bilge pump. A good idea imho.

    Regards Neil

  10. #780
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Melb, Vic, Aus
    Posts
    757

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Hey David, congratulations on your build and first sail! What a wonderful little boat.
    Its good to learn some tough lessons straight up, no one was hurt, no damages. Might save your but later
    A suggestion, can you have the bilge pump hose (outlet) permanently fixed? That with a float switch.
    The bigger the pump the better! Go massive. Put the pump under the floorboards if you can and fix the float switch up above the boards so its not going off Willy nilly, only if you get swamped. The rest you can get with a bailer.
    Great effort all round.
    steve

  11. #781
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,507

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinghy Pipedreams View Post
    With Roger Barne's method of switching the sheeting from one stern quarter to the other, common in Brittany in the olde days, it would seem that the opportunities for this happening might come along more often if one's hawk eye is looking elsewhere as things are getting interesting?
    I use this method of sheeting myself--it's practically a necessity for a boomless rig, as the sheeting point needs to be as far aft, and as far outboard, as you can get it. A traveler would work, but a rigid bar type traveler prevents the tiller from pivoting up to save space when needed, so I don't use one.

    You could run the sheet through a ring that slides on a line led over the tiller from gunwale to gunwale, but the slack in the line (necessary to reach over the tiller) creates an inverted V shape, and the ring gets caught in the V and won't slide far enough outboard for proper sheeting angles.

    That said, I don't think it's any more likely to get your sheets in a tangle with this method--and perhaps less so. Certainly less so than with a double mainsheet (like a jib), which would be another option to get proper sheeting angles. It's a simple turn-and-pivot move that you get used to pretty quickly. I rarely miss a tack (and when I do, it's probably sailing reefed with enough wave action to stop the bow).

    Gybing in heavy winds is the one place where a little extra caution is needed, I've found. I usually deal with that by running a line over the tiller so I have a traveler as a back-up. Then I can unhook the sheet from the cleat on the windward side, and simply let it slide over on the traveler as far as it will go without needing to lean to leeward to hook the sheet (not ideal, but good enough until I have a moment to hook it on the cleat farther outboard).

    I just don't think this method is any more prone to mistakes than center sheeting. It's different, that's all. You have to spin around backwards, but once you have the timing down, it's simple.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  12. #782
    Join Date
    Mar 2022
    Location
    Anacortes WA USA
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: An Ilur in Hansville

    Thanks David for your detailed "report". My 40 yrs. of experience is in larger boats as well and with human ballasted craft it's always useful to see or be reminded of the "cascade effect" of things!
    When I scuba dived regularly it was encouraged practice to debrief and discuss what went well and...wrong on each dive. It made everyone safer and the same goes for small boat skippers. Looking forward to hearing how your changes work out for you. Still "knocked out" by the beautiful work you did building her.
    Cheers.
    DP

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