Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 56
Results 176 to 207 of 207

Thread: The Birth of the Night Heron

  1. #176
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by LOKI View Post
    TRULY WONDERFUL my friend! That is a wonderful build. I still cannot understand how you taught that bird to be so tame? Just kidding, I'm sure that you are a svengali of some sort or other! Anyway I love your build!!!!!
    Hey LOKI,

    Thank you for your kind comments! They always help to put you up went the environment gets you down.

    As for The Supervisor. . .

    He was "dropped off" by his mom about 5 years ago when he was still a youngster wearing his brown and white camouflage suit.
    Night Heron Youngster.jpg

    We started to feed him with extra care; he started to approach us to feed in our hands and not have other Herons "eat his lunch."

    Here he was feeding on my arm when another Heron landed on "his perch". . . and he attacked "à la falcon" ripping a very high pitched shriek Herons use when in an attack mode. The other Heron flew away and now knows it's place in the pecking order as the others, seen here looking on, know well.

    The Supervisor Attacks.jpg

    And that's it LOKI. . . No magic, just a love for a bird that has stayed with us these last five years.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

  2. #177
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Smilemon View Post
    Big Dreams / Small Spaces is such a good show! I liked it so much I bought Monty's book, "Down to Earth" and have incorporated a lot of his teachings into my garden projects. I love that he is so knowledgable and has so many tips, and also isn't opposed to people going about things in their own way. There are lots of right ways to plant and care for a garden, just as there seem to be lots of ways to go about building a wooden boat.

    I'm excited to see the slipway beautified and the finishing touches come together on the boat. As I said before, this has been an inspiring story in so many ways and continues to bring joy to my quarantine work-from-home days. It's really cool to see your design be incorporated into your natural landscape, which I'm sure is appreciated by everyone involved: animals, significant other, and neighbors. Your entire thread is really making Florida seem like an okay place to live/quarantine.
    Hey Smilemon,

    Glad to see another Monty fan, we too have "Down to Earth". . . and thank you for the kind words.

    We know this is not a gardening forum but for someone who doesn't have a trailerable boat or a garage to put it in. . . beautification of the immediate space is an option. We could have gone with a lift but lifts are just awful, need maintenance to keep safe and require local government permits. A slipway is easy to maintain and service and launching and retrieving of the boat is very easy. And, no permit required!

    Here is our preliminary plan for the slipway "planting project."
    Preliminary Planting Plan for Slipway.jpg
    We'll post these plans as they develop if the majority of the forum agrees. . . we certainly do not want to overstay our welcome.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

  3. #178
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 26 July 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,

    We thought we were in a "Monsoon Region" of the planet as Hanna, before she became Hanna, threw high wind and heavy rain at the "Sun Coast" before moving onto the Texas coast. In a mid-week post we showed the local TV weather graphic.

    The Build
    We hauled Night Heron up on the slipway the week before last and then the rains came. The only thing we could do was carefully inspected her for any indication of stress, scratches, etc once on the hard. We found that her hull had suffered a number of heavy scratches inflicted by the dock's sharp edges (that we'll fix soon) and her bottom paint had been scraped off by the inadvert launching a few weeks ago.

    Here is a photo of the Night Heron after a few days on the hard without a tarp cover.
    Looks Like a Derelict Boat.jpg

    Here she is after a 3 hour cleaning effort.
    Clean Boat.jpg

    Here she is 20 minutes after cleaning and being "tarped." (We couldn't go outside to take this photo so we shot it through the Lanai Panoramic Window.
    The Storm Arrives.jpg

    In essence, our build was only inspected, a punchlist generated, cleaned and "tarped."

    However. . . see the continuation of the post that follows.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 07-26-2020 at 10:40 AM. Reason: erroneous picture

  4. #179
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 26 July 2020
    Weekly Build Update Continued. . .

    The Slipway
    We couldn't work on Night Heron during the week, except for cleaning, so we did what anyone would do under the circumstances. . . pick and shovel work to alleviate boredom and boredom related stress.

    We dug a 4 foot deep (1.2m) hole and cemented two 4 inch x 4 inch (100mm x 100mm) 5 foot long (1.68m) posts to hold the slipway winch we purchased a few weeks ago.
    Winch Planted.jpg

    Then we made a mold and cement filled it to serve as the base for the cover box we nailed and more or less painted in-between filling and setting.
    Cement Poured.jpg

    The cover box was painted but the rains did a job on it - so we'll be repainting it this week if we get a good four hour dry weather break.
    Cover Box Over Winch.jpg

    This week we plan on finishing/finalizing the winch stand installation too, with or without rain.

    Last week was also filled with slipway planting (garden) planning when we couldn't be outside doing manual labor. We posted our preliminary planting scheme in answer to a forum member's comments about beautification of the slipway space after we let it slip that we were Monty Don fans. This is a project too! The idea of a boat slip looking like an ugly scar on the land is abhorrent! [Well, to us anyway.]

    That was our wet week. . . this week seems promising as we still have about 50% of "the build" to do!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

  5. #180
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Burlington, Vermont, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    The plans look great! Falling leaves and other tree bits are all I'd worry about, but a cover takes care of that.

  6. #181
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Smilemon View Post
    The plans look great! Falling leaves and other tree bits are all I'd worry about, but a cover takes care of that.
    Hey Smilemon,

    Thank you for the accolade - BTW, the 3 trees in the plan exist and the Pines on either side of Night Heron are the culprits when winds and rain dump Spanish Moss and tree debris into the hull if Night Heron is not "tarped."

    The final design for an environmental boat cover is a chain-link fence tube framed, Sunbrella (or equivalent) fabric covered Quonset Hut. For us, the proportioning of the hut and the surrounding landscaping is critical to prevent having a "sore thumb" in the yard. Our desire is to incorporate it into a cohesive, pleasant, place where one can sit with family and friends and have a cooling drink at a round table and talk boating, cruising adventures, fishing and other topics.

    Stay tuned on this one. . . and if you or any forum member has any ideas. . .

    Stay safe. stay healthy.

    J.

  7. #182
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 2 August 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    The week went well in spite of the unexpected (any time of the day) downpours and very hot muggy days on the Sun Coast. Thanks to Divine Providence we were spared from a hurricane that finally became a "Tropical Storm." In between these environmental conditions, and a "creative work schedule" we were able to do some repairs. . .

    Keelson and Frame Issues.jpg
    When we were flipping Night Heron a few months ago, one of the strongback posts hung up on frame #4 at the keelson and caused an imperceptible hairline crack we were not able to detect at the time. After we inadvertently splashed and started to "sea trial" her, the crack began to "open up" enough to be visible. We also found that the keelson was affected at the scarf top edge (facing forward) with some separation of the wood from the epoxy layer, i.e., the joint did not fail, the frame's wood ripped a wide sliver of keelson wood out.

    Keelson and Frame Repair.jpg
    The repair we did was to top the keelson with another like plank (a keelgrandson??) and run frame crosspieces all epoxied and secured in place with s/s screws.

    Starboard Bow Gouge Repair.jpg

    The hull was badly scratched from a sharp edged dock, as we previously stated, so we longboarded, with 220 grit, and primed the entire starboard side. Refinishng with topcoat paint is now scheduled for the coming days. We will have to do the same with the port side of the hull - an event we'll tackle after the starboard side is finished.

    Bow Lights.jpg
    The bow lights will also be finished and wired, an activity that fell by the wayside due to the inadvertent splashing.

    And that was our trying week. . . "Déjà vu all over again" [Yogi Berra]

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

  8. #183
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 9 August 2020
    Weekly Build Update Part 1

    Hey All,
    How many "WTF Moments" can you have in a week?

    It seems that the older we get, the less these moments pop up in our lives; could it be our longevity and the "we've seen it all" assumption?

    A couple of days ago the weather forecast was for an 18 hour window with no rain! Great! Time to refinish the hull of Night Heron. So. . .

    At the beginning of the week, on or about 0700 hours, Mark, our resident retired Waterway Patrol Officer, knocks on our door. As soon as we opened it Mark states - "Stan's boat is in the water" and flashes this photo on his iPhone. Our first WTF Moment. . .

    Stan's Boat Bow.jpg

    Instead of having our favorite breakfast of coffee, o.j., waffles, sausage and eggs, we told the better half to hold the grill as we walked out of the house, still in our "jammies" to head over to Stan's dock and see the event. Assessing that a good timber and straps setup and a decent electric pump could work to re-float the boat, we asked Mark to round up a few local retirees as we went back to breakfast. We called Stan, who was up in Virginia for the week, and told him what we planned to do. The photo we sent him was received with words normally reserved for drunken sailors and not fit for publication. We only publish his decent response to our proposal- "Do it."

    The preparations for re-floating the boat took over an hour and with our 4x4 Jeep providing the pulling power; the effort began in earnest around 1000 hours.

    Rigging The Boat & Jeep.jpg

    We went at it for about 4 hours and the boat was re-floated, towed by John, a retired 40ish neighbor with a like 20' (6m) LOA Trophy to the local launching ramp where the boat's trailer was waiting. We got her out and removed the bilge plug. . . 10 minutes later we moved her to Stan's home trailer pad.

    On Trailer at Boat Ramp.jpgOn Trailer at Home.jpg

    "How'd you get her to float?" asked Stan on the phone. We replied - "With science, a good pump and 4 old guys on the bow to get her stern up above the waterline."

    Now the second "WTF Moment" see Part 2 that follows. . .

  9. #184
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 9 August 2020
    Weekly Build Update Part 2

    Hey All again,

    We did very little on the build as we were "hurting" for a few days after "Stan's Boat Re-floating Event" (as it's been coined in our neighborhood for saecula saeculorum.) The other guys too did little or nothing at all for a few days as muscle power was amply used to do the task. Our hull finishing weather window was sunk along with Stan's boat and the re-floating event.

    The Build
    Yeah. . . a day later we remembered that we needed to do some work on Night Heron and as we started late in the day, we were met with the second WTF Moment of the week. . .

    The two transom knees that were supposed to be installed prior to the inadvertent launching of Night Heron were finally installed. As we were quickly bolting the starboard knee to the gunwale, in an effort to prevent the thickened epoxy from setting, a pontoon boat full of old timers slowly passed by at no wake speed.

    The skipper of the boat yelled out - "I love that boat ramp. . . great job!" followed by a slight pause and - "That boat looks good too!" Wow, another WTF Moment!

    Transom Knees.jpg

    3M 5200 is not "sandable" as some marine store ads claim. The 5200 literature, packaging and application tube does not claim it to be sandable. And, as innocence would have it; we did NOT mask those areas we intended to prime and finish with topcoat.

    Two days later, both the port and starboard gunwale tops were hand shaved and sanded millimeter by millimeter to prepare them for topcoat finishing.

    Shaving The Gunwale Tops.jpg

    The gunwales, cap rails and transom were finally primed with a high build primer.

    Primed Cap Rails, Gunnels and Transom.jpg

    Next on the agenda. . . if no neighbor's boat becomes a submarine and we get a good weather window - finish the gunwales, rails, transom and, of course, the hull.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 08-09-2020 at 09:44 AM.

  10. #185
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 15 August 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    We had a marvelous week of dry patches of up to 12 hours duration per day, for 6 days, for which we thank Divine Providence.

    Gunwales, Cap Rails & Transom
    We used those "weather windows" to finish the gunwales, cap rails and transom; three coats as recommended. As most of you know, that meant three mornings of finishing as the topcoat is a 24 hour repeat process. Each topcoat application took us 2 hours a day that also gave us ample time to do some rub rail sanding and refinishing!
    Gunwales, Cap Rails & Transom Finished.jpg

    Rub Rails
    What?. . . Okay, you're looking at the rub rails inside the Lanai (Sun Room) over the chess table on the chair backs, drying. It rained after we third coated them. My son and I are playing a chess game that for a few days was interrupted. He understood why we didn't respond when we sent him this photo. [BTW, we are losing and suspect the guy may be using a computer on us.] The refinished rub rails will be reattached this coming week and as weather is not an issue we expect to have them on by mid-week.
    Rub Strakes Refinished.jpg

    Deck Grates
    The rub rail refinishing only took an hour a day fro 3 days as this was also a 24 hour between applications process. So, this too gave us an opportunity to make two deck grates and preliminarily first coated them before we dry fitted them inside the hull.
    Deck Grates in Production.jpg

    The deck grates measure 3/8 inch (9.5mm) thick, 72 inches (1.83m) long x 12 1/2 inches (31.75cm) wide made from repurposed white oak floor boards. The length of the grates make them span over 5 frames as seen in the photo. We placed 2 grates side by side to ascertain what dimensions we physically require as opposed to our initial, theorectical [wow, haven't used that word for a while] dimensioning.

    Well, we were fairly close, but not quite on the button as these grates are meant to be removeable for cleaning and accurate cuts will make them easy to remove (and replace) for hull cleaning and retreiving those items that will find their way between the slats to rest on the hull spaces between the frames.
    Deck Grates First Fitting.jpg

    And that was our very productive week! If we can get another week of long rain free periods, the hull will be, hopefully, refinished this week.

    Stay safe, stay healthy!

    J.

  11. #186
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    676

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Greetings Kap!

    Thanks for posting all this info and photo's of your build! Not sure how I missed it earlier, but it's kept me glued to the monitor as I catch up. And enjoying every minute of it!

    Eric
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  12. #187
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Greetings Kap!

    Thanks for posting all this info and photo's of your build! Not sure how I missed it earlier, but it's kept me glued to the monitor as I catch up. And enjoying every minute of it!

    Eric
    Hey Eric,
    Welcome aboard!

    We've been following your posts since 2019 and must admit that they are good reading too. The photos of the gaffes you posted are great as they showed us first time builders the pitfalls of the craft and helped us avoid them [as best we could.]

    We venture to guess that we are of the "old school" that admits it's mistakes and that's a good thing for everybody. For me in particular - I see these posts as more than the chronicling of a build; they are also a chronicling of the every day events (some positive, some negative) that affects the build, our home life and community.

    This photo shows 1 of the 2 bollards we carved out of a 4" (100mm) x 4" (100mm) x 38" (1m) treated lumber and cemented into the ground to hold Night Heron from sliding down the slipway. They also serve as a metaphor for our day to day activity.

    Night Heron's Bollards.jpg

    Thank you for your posts and keep them 'em coming - we really enjoy them!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  13. #188
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 23 August 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    We've been in the "building doldrums" all week as wet weather conditions hit the Florida Peninsula from Monday through Saturday.

    Tropical Storm Laura shifted West sparing us on the Sun Coast from a direct hit; however, our citizens living along the Gulf Coast states will be taking a double whammy as Tropical Marco and Laura will hit them with a "one-two punch" starting mid-week. [A meteorological first.] FYI, these two storms are and will continue to impact our local weather starting tonight and going into mid-week with rain and squalls.

    In all, we only had a few hours of dry spells in-between the downpours to do our build.

    Watchful Eyes
    Wellington Jackson ar Home.jpg
    Wellington Jackson, our resident American Alligator, seems to have taken a fancy to our build, stopping to glare at Night Heron, as it patrols the canal more often this month than at any other time. BTW, we named Wellington after an alligator that passed our sailboat daily on his way to supper at a local restaurant where they fed him scraps. At the time, we were anchored on the Pedregal River at the "Pedregal Boat Marina" in Pedregal, David, Chiriquí Province, Panama.

    Grates Galore
    Deck Grates with Initial Finish.jpgStern Deck Grates.jpg
    We built and finished more deck grates this week as we were able to dry them inside the Lanai over the chess set table as we did with the rub rails last week. After the grates dried, we dry fitted them inside the hull. We hope to trim and finish the Grates this week and fix the two gasoline tank enclosures/seats on both sides over them. Other grates will be built if we can't get a good dry spell to work on refinishing the hull.

    Rub Rails
    Rub Rails Installed.jpg
    The restored rub rails were finally(!!!) installed during a 4 hour dry spell on Thursday. . . an hour later it rained.

    The Bow and Hull
    Bow Refinishing.jpg
    Night Heron, as we've stated on many occasions in these posts, has to have her hull refinished, but rain. . . well, you've read this one once too often. The Bow will be finished with topcoat paint as the idea of leaving it in a "natural wood finish" was not a good idea. The wood turns ugly fast so we'll go with "Plan B" and fill, smooth and paint it white as the rest of the hull.

    That was the week for us; on another positive note, we caught up with just about everyone's weekly postings in the Build/Repair section of our forum. And again, we learned a few more tips and ideas we can and will use on this build.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  14. #189
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    676

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Thanks for the kind words Joe, I certainly appreciate them! And you're right, if someone can learn something from our foibles, then everyone is a winner!

    Wellington Jackson looks just a bit too hungry there. Glad that the supervisor has got his number. One of WJ's cousin's was causing some troubles up at Lake Jessup the other day, so be sure to keep a keen eye out for him.

    Night Heron is looking great! Those deck grates really fit in with the color palate she has. Thanks for posting! Keep 'em coming!

    Eric
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  15. #190
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Zbigit
    Posts
    1,630

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Hey Skip,
    Thank you for the kind thoughts and coming aboard. . . and The Supervisor also wants to say thank you before we cast off.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

    The Supervisor takes the helm.
    Attachment 63526
    I haven't chcked in, in a while....that's a great shot of the Night Heron! LOL
    Congratulations on the sort-of launch and ~near completion~...the boat looks GREAT! The floorboards add significantly to eye appeal, BTW.
    Last edited by Alan H; 08-23-2020 at 12:01 PM.

  16. #191
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Thanks for the kind words Joe, I certainly appreciate them! And you're right, if someone can learn something from our foibles, then everyone is a winner!

    Wellington Jackson looks just a bit too hungry there. Glad that the supervisor has got his number. One of WJ's cousin's was causing some troubles up at Lake Jessup the other day, so be sure to keep a keen eye out for him.

    Night Heron is looking great! Those deck grates really fit in with the color palate she has. Thanks for posting! Keep 'em coming!

    Eric
    Hey Eric,
    You're right, every time we approach the stern of Night Heron, we carefully scope the waterway for any unusual movements as we also have Manatees, Dolphins, trophy size Snook and the proverbial large Turtles lurking about. We don't swim or enter the water in these here parts unless there is someone [in our case, the better half] on "Wellington watch" with a S&W model 29.

    The Night Heron's "color scheme" follows the bird's colors and the grates are a close match to the bird's feet and talons. . . we didn't plan on this - it was a heck of a pleasant surprise for us!

    As for "The Build". . . today we finally finished her hull! We had 2 days of 16 hour dry spells that allowed us to "get 'er done." Yesterday, Tuesday, we finished the Port and today we did the Starboard side!

    We finished around 1230 hours so we put on the music player the Alan Jackson/Jimmy Buffett duo song "It's Five O'clock Somewhere." I also did an Irish Jig that my better half felt was "a bit too much for an Old Guy." [Too bad, we felt it was a good rendition in accompaniment to "It's Five O'clock Somewhere." [Unfortunately, or fortunately, we had no audience.]
    Get 'er Done.jpg

    And that has been how we spent our three days this week. . . we hope you're doing well with your moving, resettling and build. . . but more than that. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy!

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  17. #192
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I haven't checked in, in a while....that's a great shot of the Night Heron! LOL
    Congratulations on the sort-of launch and ~near completion~...the boat looks GREAT! The floorboards add significantly to eye appeal, BTW.
    Hey Alan,
    Well, welcome back aboard! Glad to have you.

    Thank you for your comments; really appreciated.

    As we posted in Eric's reply, the deck grate's color was one of those "what the heck" moments when we saw them (and the rub rails) the day after they dried and darkened. Anyway, we'll take anything we didn't plan that makes for good eye appeal as you noted.
    Dry Fitting Deck Grates.jpg

    Keep in touch. . . this Sunday we'll also "unveil" a few more good things that have occurred this week.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  18. #193
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,547

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Looking great! Perhaps while you are working on the cuddy cabin you might get by with a simple tent of the sort used on the Pulsifer Hampton?



    Simple to make, would look good on Night Heron, and would provide a little bit of shelter.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #194
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Looking great! Perhaps while you are working on the cuddy cabin you might get by with a simple tent of the sort used on the Pulsifer Hampton?



    Simple to make, would look good on Night Heron, and would provide a little bit of shelter.

    Hey Chris,
    Yes, you're right; a simple tent will have to do as we've become obsessed with getting Night Heron on the river and simply enjoying the environment. Here is what happened yesterday, Saturday. . .

    Off to River.jpg

    We took a short 2 hour cruise from our canal to the Myakka River. . . it was great to feel the water rushing under the hull at 2500 rpm!

    The View from the Stern.jpg

    Enjoy your environs as we've started to enjoy ours. . . now, if only we can install that tent and camper stove (need to brew & drink espresso) for an overnighter.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 08-30-2020 at 07:25 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  20. #195
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 30 August 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    It has been a fantastic week of rain free periods extending over 12 hours on a number of days. Our productivity was incredible - it felt like it was winter on the Sun Coast, productivity wise, although we had heat indices over 104 degrees F (40C) after 1300 hours. So, from 0800 to 1300 hours The Old Guy could be found "at the shipyard" [better half's description for the slipway.]

    Hull Refinished! Yea!
    Starboard Side 2.jpg
    The hull was refinished, stripes and all, and the bilge pumps thru-hull fittings installed (we have 2 bilge pumps,) one on the port and one on the starboard side. This activity took three days. . . but it's done for now and we're not looking forward to doing it again, at least for 12 months!

    Night Heron gets her "colors" (port bilge pump thru-hull aft of graphics.)
    Graphics Application.jpgNight Heron's Graphics.jpg
    The graphics took all of 6 hours, or 3 hours per side; we're sure other folks are faster but we sacrificed speed for precision. Going in we knew that we only had one shot at getting it right as our refinished topside paint was only 2 days old [not 100% dry.] After we got through this phase, we downed a Guinness, dark Irish, dry stout. We would've downed a few more but the better half got in the way of the fridge door.

    The Slipway Winch Control & Scale
    Winch Control and Scale.jpg
    The winch control cable was replaced with one long enough to reach the seawall as the original was only 10 feet (3m) long. Additionally, we installed a digital scale that provides us with the pulling force the winch has to deal with as it pulls Night Heron up the slipway. The scale provides both pounds and kilos and we'll use it to indicate when maintenance to the wheels Night Heron gets pulled onto as the force increases. The actual pull (our baseline) is registering 300 pounds (136kg) after a number of tests to get her out of the canal and onto her nest.

    And Guess What?. . .
    Leaving For River.jpg
    "Color me gone" - On Saturday we did a 2 hour cruise down the Myakka River from our canal to Port Charlotte Bay. It was a peaceful, lovely short cruise. As we start to build the cuddy cabin off the boat, we'll be putting a tent and camper stove on the bow to provide shelter for a planned overnighter.

    But, first things first - the floor deck and interior fitting is on the agenda for the coming weeks. Time to finalize everything we "dry fitted" for testing purposes.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 08-30-2020 at 09:22 AM. Reason: photos not showing
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  21. #196
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,547

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Hey Joe, no photos showing in that last post. But congrats on getting Night Heron out for a river cruise! A tent and a stove for coffee will be just the thing. And perhaps a bucket for other necessary chores...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #197
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Hey Joe, no photos showing in that last post. But congrats on getting Night Heron out for a river cruise! A tent and a stove for coffee will be just the thing. And perhaps a bucket for other necessary chores...
    Thank you, Chris. . . we just did an edit. It looks like it's okay now.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  23. #198
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,547

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Thank you, Chris. . . we just did an edit. It looks like it's okay now.

    J.
    Yes. All good now. Looks great!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  24. #199
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Kap - lookin good on the water.
    Just a thought ($0.01) - would a bow eye lower on the stem give you a better line of pull and thus LIFT? Could be the pic but the winch is on the ground and could be pulling the boat down against tires instead of up etc..

  25. #200
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    Kap - lookin good on the water.
    Just a thought ($0.01) - would a bow eye lower on the stem give you a better line of pull and thus LIFT? Could be the pic but the winch is on the ground and could be pulling the boat down against tires instead of up etc..
    Hey gray duck,
    Good to hear from you. . . especially since your observation is 100% dead on!

    This was one of those things we had planned to do but didn't get around to it because. . . three weeks ago we ordered a stainless steel 12 inch (4.7cm) long lifting shoulder bolt and got one that was only 6 inches (2.4cm) long. So much for drilling and mounting the bow pulling bolt at mid stem.
    Attachment 67414
    Shoulder Bolts.jpg
    We got a replacement - a 12 inch (4.7cm) bolt - on Saturday and the company told us to keep the 6 inch (2.4cm.)

    Guess what we'll be doing this week(?)

    Gray duck, if you see anything we may have missed or could have done better - please let us know as we really appreciate your, and any forum member's, contribution to this build. Thanks again!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 08-31-2020 at 09:50 PM. Reason: missing photo
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  26. #201
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Zbigit
    Posts
    1,630

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    The graphics look great.

    What I would give to be able to launch my boat from my back yard! Your winch and rollers are the bomb!

  27. #202
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    The graphics look great.

    What I would give to be able to launch my boat from my back yard! Your winch and rollers are the bomb!
    Hey Alan H,
    Thank you for your comment. . . the graphics became a must after a few boating neighbors asked us what we had named her.

    As for the slipway. . . yes, it makes for easy access to the water. One downside is when the tide goes out and you have to wait for a number of hours; in this case it was 5 hours to retrieve.

    Waiting for Tide to Rise.jpg

    BTW, we can launch near low water, but can't retrieve until high tide.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  28. #203
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 6 September 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    Another marvelous week of long 12 hour no rain periods this last week; however, the heat index crept up to 108F (42C) that made for a "build time" from 0800 to 1300 hours.

    The build time for the week amounted to very little as the week should be rightly called "Mercury Maintenance Week." It all started with fuel starvation on a test run to the Big Slough (about 1.2NM from our slipway) we did on Monday, 31 August. Most of the waterway is "no wake" but there are a few areas bereft of docks/homes and most boaters and jet-skiers get their vessels up on plane if only for a few minutes. They use the access as a sort of testing area prior to getting to the Myakka River where wakes are permitted past the shore homes.

    Mercury 40Hp, 4 Stroke EFI Fuel System
    Mercury 40Hp, 4 Stroke Fuel Line.jpg

    We got back "ahead-dead slow" as the engine sputtered and died a few times. As it turned out, it wasn't the diaphragm pump (that we tested) nor the filter (that we changed) that was causing fuel starvation. . . it was this "puppy" that was collapsing due to old age.
    Erroneous Fuel Line.jpg
    The Mercury 40Hp engine is EFI (Electronic Fuel Injected) and requires a fuel line made for fuel injected engines. So much for a two day investment in watching videos on Mercury DIY pump overhauls, fuel line issues and Mercury Maintenance Manual reading [the manual is on our hard drive.] We've had years of outboard engine experience but never on high horsepower 4 stroke Mercurys.

    BTW, it's recommended that outboard fuel lines be inspected every year and replaced every 4 to 5 years if they become brittle or frayed.

    So what else could go wrong. . . we cared for the Mercury, got 'er feeding well again, but she wouldn't charge her battery. Not to be denied after all that work, we started to look on the net, again, for videos to troubleshoot the Mercury electrical system. The first video advised the viewer to first check the fuses before doing anything else! Must be old age but we should've known that; as it turned out it was a 20 amp "mini-fuse" after all. Another day "shot" and as the better half later remarked - "Aren't you the one who told me that when the lights go out in the house to always check the fuses(?)" My feeble reply was - "They're not called fuses anymore, they're circuit breakers." She retorted - "Same difference."
    20 Amp Mini Fuses.jpg

    What is the moral of these stories? Read you engine's manual as sometimes your experience may not be enough.

    The Build
    A few days back we had a post from gray duck that we responded to and here is the "finished product" from that exchange. We measured, found the center of the post 2 inches (50mm) thick by 6 inches (15cm) wide and drilled carefully as we knew that were no "second chances" to get it right. The drill came out on the inside almost dead center. We were satisfied with the effort and able to breathe easily once finished. With an electric metal cutting blade we chopped off the excess length of the bolt, inserted it bathed in wood flour thickened epoxy and it backed it up with a large washer and lock-nut. The first photo shows the location on the stem. The second photo shows the winch and stem eye-bolt connected by the cable.
    Bow Eye Bolt Installed.jpg WInch and Cable Setup.jpg

    That was the week we had. . . much Mercury less Nigh Heron. But, and there is always a "but". . . the hard knocks taught us well not to trust instinct.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  29. #204
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Monday Special Post - 7 Sept 2020

    Hey All,
    We normally post on Sundays but had to report that the maintenance we did on Night Heron's Mercury 4 stroke was effective!

    This allowed us to "test cruise" the Myakka River this glorious morning from 0830 to 1100 hours. The tide was starting to descend but higher than we needed to launch and after our cruise, high enough to retrieve her from the canal. Anyway, the morning was fresh, the sun still hadn't heated up the atmosphere and it was a perfect moment for a river run.

    Today is a holiday in the USA called "Labor Day" [kind of an oxymoron - holiday from labor day] and you'd think there would've been hundreds on the water - there wasn't. There must be, easily, over 5,000 boats in this area but we only encountered 4 and one was a commercial trapper tending traps. We can't believe that all those pontoon and deck boats up on lifts hardly ever leave their bunks! We're also in the state considered the "capital of the retirement world" where we're supposed to be enjoying our environment - so, what's wrong with those retired old wind passers with boats(?)

    So much for proselytizing, here are the photos of our little cruise. . . Enjoy!

    The Slough
    The Slough.jpg

    Entry into Main River Stream
    Entry into Main River Stream.jpg

    Myakka River South
    Myakka River South.jpg

    Riverside Park
    Riverside Park.jpg

    Myakka River North
    Myakka River North.jpg

    See y'all Sunday, or earlier if something great happens on our shore of the river.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 09-07-2020 at 03:05 PM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  30. #205
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 13 September, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    We're in the right front quadrant of tropical storm Sally right now and as everyone knows, this is the nastiest side of the storm. So far we have not had any damages here in North Port. The week summed up as 4 days of 6 hours per day of rain free time.

    Sally over North Port.jpg
    The Build

    On Monday we took apart the vapor separator assembly housing of the Mercury EFI engine to access the float and high pressure pump. Muck and debris made it's way to the unit causing the float to stick and stop up the fine mesh at the bottom of the pressure pump. 20/20 being what it is. . . we should've taken care of this when we worked on the low pressure pump, hose and filter replacement the previous week. The engine is working well again.

    Vapor Separator Housing.jpg
    This week we got some water into the hull over the transom engine cutout while launching at high water, so we designed and started to make an outboard motor well. It took a full day of taking dimensions, doing sketches and countless corrections to make the well the proper size for the engine.


    Mounting the Slats.jpg
    Continued next post. . . .



    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 09-13-2020 at 11:00 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  31. #206
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 13 September 2020
    Weekly Build Update Continuation. . .

    Hey All again,
    Had to break this into two posts as the site didn't allow 5 photos on one.

    We dimensioned the well bottom on the transom underneath the engine. BTW, it was too small.
    Measuring for Well.jpg

    The enlarged well covered with thickened epoxy ready for fiberglassing.
    Well Epoxied.jpg

    And that's what happened this last week. We hope to finish and mount the well this week plus continue work on the interior wiring, lights, fixing fuel enclosures/seats and floor panels.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  32. #207
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 20 September, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    This was the week when the Spiral Rainbands of Hurricane Lucy kept our part of Florida in constant rain for 5 days! In between the rain, we went at only one project- the engine water well we started to build almost 2 weeks ago. . . yeah, 2 weeks ago. . . that how bad those rainbands kept us at bay. Never the less. . .

    Here is the sequence of events over those 2 weeks. . .
    Well Collage 1.jpg
    1 - Shows our inspiration for the rounded motor well as it appeared in a Pinterest photo. We went with round to break the straight lines in and outside the hull of Night Heron;
    2 - Our first attempt to make a rounded base for the well;
    3 - The first fitting on the transom;
    4 - The mounting of the slats on the base using the time honored Jack Daniel's old school method we observed on a trip to the distiller in Lynchburg, Tennessee (USA) forty years ago [And Lynchburg continues to be a dry county so you can't buy the product at the distillery];
    5 - Test fitting the well on the transom, it turned out to be too tight a fit for the engine.

    Well Collage 2.jpg
    6 - We enlarged the well and caulked it with 25% cabosil and 35% wood flour thickened epoxy (at 40%) to insure structural integrity;
    7 - The fiberglassing was easy with 1708 being our interior covering of choice;
    8 - We made a fairing compound using 30% cabosil, 30% talc and 40% epoxy - after 24 hours we sanded smooth to the proverbial baby's behind starting with 120 and finishing 200 grit sandpaper;
    9 - The enlarged well is dry fitted to the transom prior to finishing (with topside paint) maybe this week weather permitting.

    And that has been our slow as a snail build week that we pray we never have to repeat again. . . good riddance Lucy!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 09-20-2020 at 11:12 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •