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Thread: The Birth of the Night Heron

  1. #281
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    Jul 2009
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    Zbigit
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    2,197

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Do you have a plan for how you'll do thesole in the cabin? I'd be tempted to continue the slats that you've set up in the cockpit.

    With the bimini on, that is going to be a really nice shallow-water cruiser!

  2. #282
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I just caught up with this thread.
    Wonderful work!
    It's great that you can enjoy the boat while finishing her.
    Hello Rich,
    Welcome aboard the cruise! We still have a few more nautical miles to go so don't jump ship on us! And, thank you for the kind words; they all make it worthwhile!

    Yes, the idea was to use Night Heron the moment she was water ready so as to "test her abilities." Also, the Myakka River is one of the few pristine rivers left in the country that we sorely wanted to explore - even though we're not registered or "water legal."

    Here is a shot of the environs from our first outing to do "sea trials". . .

    Entry into Main River Stream.jpg

    Stay safe, stay healthy!

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  3. #283
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Do you have a plan for how you'll do the sole in the cabin? I'd be tempted to continue the slats that you've set up in the cockpit.

    With the bimini on, that is going to be a really nice shallow-water cruiser!
    Hello Alan,
    We prepared a sketch for my son about a week ago. . . uncannily, your question is very timely:

    Night Heron Top View Cuddy Cabin Layout.jpg

    We put all the info into the sketch 'cause the Son likes to view everything on his smart phone. Not mentioned - 2 bladder potable water storage tanks that may be stored beneath the bunks. The Jury still out on size and location if trim is affected.

    We like your definition of the Night Heron. . . "shallow-water cruiser." Thanks!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  4. #284
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 17 December, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    It was not a very productive week due to foul weather on the Sun Coast - it drizzled on Tuesday and Wednesday and Saturday gave us very high winds. These events made our build a stop and go, taxing task - especially when we did sanding, epoxying and finishing not knowing if the job would be compromised by weather.

    Anyway. . . we did get in three days and here are the results on our timeline:

    Monday and Thursday Morning
    1 Monday and Thursday Morning Tasks.jpg
    1 - We did a quick sketch on Sunday night of how the center stringer of the cabin top would be constructed and mounted;
    2 - The stringer and the cabin crossbeams were notched and after various trips to the work bench later - the stringer was dry fitted prior to epoxy fixing;
    3 - Monday night the stringer was epoxied in place, and:
    4 - Thursday morning the stringer was shaped to the surrounding beams, considered finished and ready for the "lid."

    Thursday
    2 Thursday Tasks.jpg
    1 - This is the "before photo" of the helm cabin and amidships helm walls frame from the inside;
    2 - Photo 2 shows the two walls epoxied in place and mechanically fixed to the same frames;
    3 - To the right of the photo is the port side cockpit cabin wall epoxied and mechanically fixed to the frame, and:
    4 - The finished port side wall shown from the cockpit.

    Friday
    3 Friday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The helm dry fitted into the sub-frame made for it after much fiddling and cutting off a few millimeters of it's fixing feet to the frame below;
    2 - This photo shows the port side cockpit wall's top trimmed to be flush with the crossbeam that supports it;
    3 - The helm starboard cabin wall was also trimmed to be flush with the crossbeam that supports it, and:
    4 - Friday's last photo of the walls and helm awaiting further work that we will plan on tackling this coming week.

    That was our shortened week. . . a little here and a little there.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  5. #285
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    Jul 2009
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    Zbigit
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Looks comfy! In a V-hull, for San Francisco Bay, this is the sort of powerboat I could enjoy.

  6. #286
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 24 January 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    First - sorry for the error in last weeks post identifying it as a December post when it showed have read "Sunday, 17 January, 2021." Again, chalk it up to old age!

    It was a great week on the Sun Coast and even with a few hours break for watching Democracy rear it's lovely head; much was done on the build, including some that is not obvious.

    Anecdote of the week:
    Better Half as the port cabin wall was getting curlicued - "You're gussying her up?" The Old Guy retorted - "She's not a harlot! What do you mean by hussying her up?" Better Half - "Gussying. . . G-U-S-S-Y-I-N-G. . . you'd better get your hearing checked; that sander is doing a job on you." So, at 76. . . yeah, we've scheduled a trip to the audiologist for a hearing test in 2 weeks.

    As for the build:

    Monday to Wednesday
    Monday to Wednesday.jpg
    1 - The interior cabin walls and posts were "rough" and needed sanding to make it a people friendly environment. The edges of the posts were sharp, the carlins had splinters and epoxy peaks as did the interior of the cabin rails. The sanding took an entire day and after that activity - it became safe to run your fingers over all the interior cabin wall surfaces and underneath the decking:
    2 - Posts were "sculpted" to make them "head slamming friendly" as we contemplate rummaging inside a cuddy cabin with limited headroom;
    3 - Tuesday afternoon was the start of finishing with the first coat of top paint. . . it took longer to first finish the cuddy cabin than it took to paint 2 rooms in the house! and:
    4 - Wednesday was entirely dedicated to finishing the interior of the cuddy cabin as we repaired a few areas that were not "finger friendly." 3 days to finish a small space, oy vey!

    Thursday
    Thursday.jpg
    1 - Thursday was a "details, details, details" day that started with removing the temporary steering cable plastic straps (that deteriorate in sunlight) to permanently embed them into the frames;
    2 - The 1/2 inch (12mm) slots were cut into the frames and the steering cable was thickened epoxied in place. In a few days, thickened epoxy will be used to finish each frame before top coating with paint to make them whole again;
    3 - Amidships Cockpit Cabin wall was thickened epoxied in place, and;
    4 - Friday morning the wall was ready for top edge trimming and edge sanding to get it ready for the framework (to be made during the week) that will hold the cuddy cabin access doors.

    Friday and Saturday
    Friday to Saturday.jpg
    1 - The curlicued port cabin wall end was reinforced with a deck piece cut with an arc to "round out the corner." The deck piece was incorporated into the existing deck and made to withstand the weight of a person seeking access to the forward deck, i.e., it's the first stepping surface to get onto the deck;
    2 - The port rail cap at the curlicued wall end was cut to set the deck plate in place;
    3 - The curlicued wall had to be trimmed to make it "blend" with the arced deck plate, and:
    4 - The deck plate thickened epoxied in place - underneath are s/s screws used to mechanically hold the deck plate to the carlin frame and sheer plate.

    Saturday afternoon
    Saturday Afternoon.jpg
    The Port amidships deck access plate awaiting final shaping, fiberglassing and finishing to the existing deck.

    Yes, it was a very good week. . . we hope you all had one too!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  7. #287
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    northeast Ohio
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    2,513

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    I don't always have anything to say, but I always enjoy seeing your weekly updates.
    This is really turning into quite a cool little vessel you are building.
    Keep up the good work, and the reports.

  8. #288
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    741

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Very nice! Love that curlicued look!
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  9. #289
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    Jul 2009
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    Zbigit
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    2,197

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    You're adding so many little curves that you are really going to have softened the "angular" look of the boat.

  10. #290
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    I don't always have anything to say, but I always enjoy seeing your weekly updates.
    This is really turning into quite a cool little vessel you are building.
    Keep up the good work, and the reports.
    Hello timo,
    Thank you for your kind words. . . and remember that any idea, suggestion or observation you may have is always welcomed!

    Your builds show a fantastic attention to detail that is enviable so please jump in anytime; many of the features and ideas we've used on Night Heron were brought to our attention through this forum.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  11. #291
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Very nice! Love that curlicued look!
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    You're adding so many little curves that you are really going to have softened the "angular" look of the boat.
    Hello Guys,
    Yeah. . . curlicues, curves and hopefully, graceful lines, are in the plans for Night Heron as we hope to break those straight lines, angular and sharp corners we see in many home builds.

    The time consuming effort of sketching, figuring out how to do it and, in some cases, designing how to build it, as you both have experienced, is sometimes frustrating. Yet, when something works - wow! What a feeling!

    We're sure that you'll agree that it is not just the finishing of the project, but the process that makes it all worthwhile.

    Here is last nights photo of the cabin wall to roof deck's "rounded corner" made from 7, 15 degree cut slats after first (rough) sanding:
    Rounded Corner.jpg
    Yep. . . it was a full eight hours worth of work and only the port side!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  12. #292
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 31 January 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    It was another fantastic week on the Sun Coast albeit a bit chilly in the mornings; making our starts a mid-morning event. Nevertheless, our productivity was pretty good; the hours and days seemed to pass too quickly and soon it was Saturday afternoon, our normal 1500 hours "quit time." Here is that effort in photos:

    Monday through Wednesday
    Monday to Wednesday.jpg
    1 - The forward deck access step was shaped to blend into the rest of the surroundings and fiberglassed in place;
    2 - Here is the step trimmed and awaiting epoxy filler compound to smooth out the surface prior to finishing, to be part of the cabin finishing effort;
    3 - The rounded corner of the port side cabin wall was an 8 hour effort that was finished as the "no-see-ums" began their relentless attacks, and:
    4 - Wednesday was the starboard side cabin wall's turn to "get round" after a painstaking, one at a time mounting of 7, 8 feet long (2.44m) 15 degree cut slats.

    Thursday to Saturday
    Thursday to Saturday.jpg
    1 - On Thursday morning the rounded corners were smooth sanded and epoxy hard - ready for a roof deck to be sized into space between them;
    2 - And, after a day of fitting and trimming and sanding and tiring back and forth trips to the bench. . . the "lid" was finally epoxied in place;
    3 - The fitted deck roof's edge was routed atwardships on the forward (bow) side to make a 1/2 inch (12mm) lap joint to mate to the next deck panels that were made, and:
    4 - Saturday afternoon - the other panels were routed and dry fitted to ascertain fit - the arrow shows where the cabin-top hatch opening will be cut to finish this panel. Final mounting, mechanical and thickened epoxy fixing will soon follow - hopefully this coming week.

    The Shelf
    Helm Station Shelf.jpg
    In an effort to break the monotony of fitting, sizing, sanding and routing panels we took a break and made a helm shelf. Incredibly, this piece of white oak was almost the right size to fit. . . all that was required was a 1/2 inch (12mm) length cut! The lip was also a breeze. . . now it'll need finishing.

    That was our "too fast ending" week; filled with wood shavings and dust galore! We hope your week went your way too.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  13. #293
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 7 February, 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    Happy Superbowl Sunday to those who are fans of Kansas City or Tampa Bay. . .

    For others around the world who enjoy the "real football" here is your schedules for today:
    England - Liverpool vs Manchester City, Spain - Real Betis vs Barcelona, Italy - Milan vs Crotone, Netherlands - VVV vs Sparta Rotterdam, Germany - Hoffenheim vs Eintracht Frankfurt, Portugal - Sporting Braga vs Port, Australia - Newgastle Jets vs Melbourne City.

    Enjoy your games!

    This was not a good game week on the Sun Coast - the weather was atrocious and the only good days were Monday, Tuesday and Friday - 3 out of 6, or 50% work days! In between the rain and cold weather, we did a few good things. . .

    Monday
    Monday.jpg
    1 - This is the half lap joint of the "hatch panel" (the last) prior to being mechanically and epoxy fixed;
    2 - The "hatch panel" fixed in place awaiting the fiberglass skin;
    3 - Bow view of the cabin-top deck showing surface preparation (gaps filled, low spots leveled) awaiting fiberglassing, and:
    4 - Helm view of the cabin-top deck after prepping for fiberglassing.

    Tuesday
    Tuesday.jpg
    1 - Tuesday morning was "epoxy time";
    2 - The first area to be glassed was from the helm/cockpit end forward to the hatch panels. The glass cloth was masked at the slat to ply joint to prevent the cabin walls from getting epoxy on them. The walls will not be glassed - they will only be finished with topside paint;
    3 - This photo shows the final epoxy application of the cockpit end of the cabin-top. The masked wall edge after the epoxy application is very noticeable, and:
    4 - A detail photo of the "rounded corner's" glass being epoxied.

    Friday
    Friday.jpg
    1 - Another detail photo taken on Tuesday to show where the masked fiberglass edge was established;
    2 - The same edge shown in photo 1 after removal and trimming of the fiberglass on Friday - leaving a fine trimmed edge;
    3 - The Old Guy gave up on making a hatch and used his 401K pension check to buy a new Lewmar medium profile #30 aluminum hatch, and,:
    4 - The Lewmar #30 hatch big enough to let the Old Guy through, but small enough to look "just right" on the cabin-top deck.
    Note on the Lewmar #30 Hatch - We really hated to spend $300 USC (250 Euro) of our pension on this unit but we had no choice as building a wood hatch was a failure after 3 tries. We have no fancy equipment, or solid flat surfaces required. . . this lack of equipment made for many wood alignment errors and frustration. So, this coming week, weather permitting, we'll finish the cabin top fiberglassing and finishing so as to allow mounting of the Lewmar hatch. "Stay tuned" as the idiom advises.

    A Final Photo
    If Only He Knew How to Sand.jpg
    He really likes the colors. . . if only he could manage an orbital sander. . .

    That was our 50%/50% week. . . we hope yours was a 100%!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 02-07-2021 at 12:35 PM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  14. #294
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    741

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    The Lewmar #30 hatch big enough to let the Old Guy through, but small enough to look "just right" on the cabin-top deck.
    Note on the Lewmar #30 Hatch - We really hated to spend $300 USC (250 Euro) of our pension on this unit
    Sounds like money well spent to me. Keep up the good work!
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  15. #295
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Salt Spring Island, BC
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    7,898

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Surprisingly this is my first post on this thread, but I've been watching. Now that you're getting so close just know that I've enjoyed it and am impressed and thankful.

    Are you going to leave the radiused edge bright? It looks neat.

  16. #296
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Charleston, SC
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    270

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    You will really like that hatch. Does great work as a wind scoop under way or with a breeze at anchor. On my Catalina 22 I made a removable (velcro) bug screen on the ceiling side for pest-free sleeping.

  17. #297
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Sounds like money well spent to me. Keep up the good work!
    Hello. . .
    You're right! After dry mounting the hatch this mid-day. . . well, it does look very neat, and the Old Guy fits through it, albeit a bit tight. Our deck is arced so we needed to raise the level of the deck 3/8" (9.5mm) at each end to make it "level" for the hatch. We made 2 mini-perches, one for starboard, one for port, as the flatness specification is only +/- 3/64" (1mm)! The photo shows the port side as we dry fit it for the sixth time!
    Side Levelers for Hatch.jpg
    That's where we are right now.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  18. #298
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Surprisingly this is my first post on this thread, but I've been watching. Now that you're getting so close just know that I've enjoyed it and am impressed and thankful.

    Are you going to leave the radiused edge bright? It looks neat.
    Hello Gib,
    Good to hear from you and thank you for the kind words.

    As for the rounded corners. . . no, the slats were stuck together with epoxy and stainless steel brads to hold them as they cured in place. After fine sanding, the brads can be seen on the surface of the wood.

    Here is a photo showing this "defect" making "bright-work" a no-no. We'll be going with topside paint to hide these brads and camouflage the fact that this is a composed radius corner:
    Brads on Surface.jpg

    Stay in touch. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  19. #299
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    You will really like that hatch. Does great work as a wind scoop under way or with a breeze at anchor. On my Catalina 22 I made a removable (velcro) bug screen on the ceiling side for pest-free sleeping.
    Hello gray duck,
    Thank you for your feedback on the Lewmar 30 hatch; we do appreciate it as we give more weight to a forum member's testimonial than those we read on the selling site.

    The hatch looks neat and we're happy with the sturdiness of the frame and the bolt mounting pattern that'll make it a tight fit.

    Thank you again, and here is a photo of the Lewmar dry fitted to the cabin top. We'll remove it tonight and mount it after we fiberglass this section of the cabin top.

    Lewmar Dry Fitted on Cabin Top.jpg


    Stay safe, stay healthy,

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  20. #300
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    SW Washington/ At Sea
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    471

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Hello. . .
    You're right! After dry mounting the hatch this mid-day. . . well, it does look very neat, and the Old Guy fits through it, albeit a bit tight. Our deck is arced so we needed to raise the level of the deck 3/8" (9.5mm) at each end to make it "level" for the hatch. We made 2 mini-perches, one for starboard, one for port, as the flatness specification is only +/- 3/64" (1mm)! The photo shows the port side as we dry fit it for the sixth time!
    Side Levelers for Hatch.jpg
    That's where we are right now.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    great progress! The small details you're adding really make the boat look 'right' and as a previous poster said it softens the angular parts. Smoothing all the vicious epoxy and wood jaggers is wise...it isn't fun to get one of those under a fingernail.

    Your hatch looks like a quality unit. I made an attempt at rebuilding the old hatch on my project and it was a lost cause...it is really difficult to build something waterproof, pretty, and functional. Not to hijack your thread but I've been working on a similar conundrum with flat hatches and deck camber. We made a donut and shaped the underside to the deck camber (or close). Here is a mock up.




    The hatch that received mixed reviews here...repainted and new gaskets installed. Yours is likely more waterproof!




    The donut glued down and filleted.



    I think your method is probably better and will be easier as there is no maintenance. Looking forward to seeing your install and how you trim out the inside. I am looking for ideas...what are you using to bed the hatch? Thanks for posting!

  21. #301
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    great progress! The small details you're adding really make the boat look 'right' and as a previous poster said it softens the angular parts. Smoothing all the vicious epoxy and wood jaggers is wise...it isn't fun to get one of those under a fingernail.

    Your hatch looks like a quality unit. I made an attempt at rebuilding the old hatch on my project and it was a lost cause...it is really difficult to build something waterproof, pretty, and functional. Not to hijack your thread but I've been working on a similar conundrum with flat hatches and deck camber. We made a donut and shaped the underside to the deck camber (or close). Here is a mock up.
    [Photo Removed for Compactness]

    The hatch that received mixed reviews here...repainted and new gaskets installed. Yours is likely more waterproof!
    [Photo Removed for Compactness]

    The donut glued down and filleted.
    [Photo Removed for Compactness]

    I think your method is probably better and will be easier as there is no maintenance. Looking forward to seeing your install and how you trim out the inside. I am looking for ideas...what are you using to bed the hatch? Thanks for posting!
    Hello Powerwagon,
    Thank you for your input - good to hear from you again. . . in response to your points:

    Well, we've tried to make the Night Heron as "sleek" or as "smooth" as possible cause anesthetics and a safe on the water surrounding is very important to us. When the better half and I were rag sailors on a C&C on the Eastern Pacific, we fell, bumped, scraped and bruised from the unexpected wind-shift, foul weather or rogue waves we encountered. Thanks to the design genius of George Cuthbertson and George Cassian, the envelope we sailed in was free of sharp edges and pointy things inside and out. Ouch! when we hit a Barlow 32 with our toes. . . or the mainsheet traveler leads got away from us. . . but, that's another story; our C&C, S/V Valkyrie, was Canadian made and had excellent interior and exterior people friendly spaces. Yes, we miss her!

    Rounded Cabin and Deck Transition Shaping.jpg
    Here is a "prelim" photo of the work we're doing on the profile of the cabin and shaping of the transition junction of the deck from incline to flat foredeck.

    The Lewmar 30 is an aluminum medium height profile hatch that when well bedded with 5200 will be watertight, or so say the reviews we've read. We gave up on making a hatch because we couldn't make it out of aluminum - we only work wood! And as you know, making a hatch, especially a low profile one out of wood is almost impossible when you don't have a good, well equipped woodworking shop - as is our case. The Lewmar hatch is not a structural or stiffening member as their instruction sheet well points out in bold letters so we had to make stiffening cross pieces under the deck that we'll photograph and post. Maintenance, as we've experienced when rag sailing is very minimal for this type of hatch and consists mainly of hinge lubrication and washing/cleaning any residue from the surrounding water.

    We remember your thread on the restoration you undertook but don't recall the final, finished, refit photos. . . you can post them here. . . heck, we don't mind sharing this post with you - or with anyone else who wants to shed light on the subject at hand.

    Thanks again, Powerwagon, hope to hear from you more often.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  22. #302
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 14 February, 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    It was an excellent weather week on the Sun Coast; we were able to change the whole aspect of the forward cabin, sides and foredeck. We went at it for the entire week, cutting, refitting the top deck, "molding and sculpting" and fiberglassing tops and sides. Here is the story in photographs:

    Monday through Wednesday
    Monday through Wednesday.jpg

    1 - We had to reinstall the cutout (right arrow) we made for our "home-built hatch" that we couldn't make so that it could be re-cut for the Lewmar 30 we purchased. The Lewmar hatch installation instructions specify a flatness of 3/64" (1mm) for the mounting surface. . . the left arrow shows the 3/8" (9.5mm) gap that resulted;
    2 - The angle and length of the gap was measured to determine the cut required for the "filler pieces" - the "wrap around" was simple; we placed 2 pieces of rectangular wood cut to size under each side of the hatch and traced the hatches periphery;
    3 - The resultant wood fillers (or "perches" as we coined them following the Heron theme) are shown on this photo before dry fitting - both pieces required 7 trips each to the table sander to take the surface to the correct height, and:
    4 - "Let the fun and games begin!" Here is the transformation effort from square to round as we cut the angled decks back, cut off the carlin rails, re-secured the rails internally and leveled the surfaces around the rounded cabin deck.

    Thursday to Saturday
    Thursday through Saturday.jpg

    1 - We cut individual rectangular wood pieces at various angles and heights, with a locking lip to hold the top securely - 32 pieces and 10 hours later, we had a "barrel" trimmed and rough sanded cabin deck;
    2 - The entire construction was, on the first round, slathered with thickened epoxy, not too thick, to fill the gaps and voids in the "barrels" periphery, Additionally, the build up of the transition surfaces from angled to flat decks on the starboard and port sides was started. Over 20 pieces of fiberglass cloth were cut to various sizes and shapes to build up low areas to mate with the flat foredeck,
    3 - Bow view of the second day of "leveling" the surface and adjacent area on the sides and top of the cabin deck, and:
    4 - Starboard view of the area, ready for final fiberglassing the top front of the cabin.

    Sunday Morning
    Fiberglassed Cabin.jpg
    This is the final photo, taken this morning, of the fiberglassed cabin awaiting further "processing" to begin this week - weather permitting.

    A fantastic week full of saw dust, epoxy and fiberglass cloth galore. . . and as the idiom so rightly notes, a week full of "blood, sweat and tears" or finger cuts, hot afternoons and irritated eyes.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 02-14-2021 at 10:30 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  23. #303
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    741

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Greetings Joe,

    I think the lead guitar player for Blood Sweat and Tears used to work in fiberglass shop!

    Looking good, just what are those two brown triangular pieces at the front of the cabin? Really thickened epoxy?

    Thanks for the update.
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  24. #304
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    Jul 2017
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    Toodyay, Western Australia
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    1,224

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Some details get pretty fiddly and time consuming, but the resulting curve looks good.

  25. #305
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Greetings Joe,

    I think the lead guitar player for Blood Sweat and Tears used to work in fiberglass shop!

    Looking good, just what are those two brown triangular pieces at the front of the cabin? Really thickened epoxy?

    Thanks for the update.
    Hello Fish,
    Wow, you and I are showing our longevity here. . . yep, we're fans of BS&T but the first era only, the so-called "Al Kooper era" when they first started and were fresh as the morning dew.

    The two triangles at the front of the cabin's "barrel front" are our "keystones" composed of heavily thickened epoxy that have a compressive strength of, approximately, 23,000psi. On the inside we made a dam that streaches for 4" (100mm) on either side to "lock the assembly." Just a way to give ourselves a modicum of tranquility if the Bruce (the bow anchor) ever bumps into the arc.

    Keystones of Thick Epoxy.jpg

    Stay safe stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  26. #306
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock View Post
    Some details get pretty fiddly and time consuming, but the resulting curve looks good.
    Hello Small boats rock,
    Good to hear from you. . . we hope you're enjoying your summer down under and sailing those gorgeous Australian shores a lot.

    Yes, the wood pieces were a Bear, or better yet, what you guys call a "saltie" to assemble; we wrestled, manipulated and finger held pieces as the tacking glue set wishing that our fingers had u-joints. It felt like we were assembling a 3D wood puzzle as the one gifted me 15 years ago. And it wasn't as much fun. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    3 D Puzzle.jpg
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  27. #307
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 21 February, 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    What a week!

    Between a few hours of rain here and there, setting us back on epoxy mixing and fiberglassing, we did make some progress that even surprised us.

    The good, dry periods of the days were very productive as our effort to fiberglass, apply fairing compound, level surfaces and mold and shape contours made the hours disappear all too soon. When it rained in the mornings, we worked after the ground was a bit harder, usually around 1400 hours; when it rained in the afternoon we stopped all activity and shrouded Night Heron with extra plastic drop-cloths.

    Yeah. . . it was, paraphrasing the old saying - ". . . a hell of a week!" Here are the photos:

    Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday
    Monday Tuesday Wednesday.jpg

    1 - The forward cabin top was masked and fiberglassed on Monday - finishing the cabin top fiberglassing task. On Tuesday morning we were trimming the edges of the fiberglass cloth, taping the area we wanted to finish with our homemade fairing compound;
    2 - As a general rule, when we need to mask an area where we plan to fair the fiberglassed surface, we use 3M Duct Tape as it stands up to the cured compound;
    3 - The tape came off and our cured fairing compound is ready for sanding smooth in preparation for primer and topside painting. The top of the cabin top will not be faired as we plan on applying Kiwigrip anti-slip over the waffle finish of the fiberglass cloth, and:
    4 - The transition areas where the inclined side decks merge with the foredeck were tough to fair even after we used over 20, 1708 glass cloth pieces per side and molding fairing compound with a stainless steel straight edge to make them flat. In the end, the transition was achieved with some success.

    Thursday & Friday
    Thursday and Friday.jpg

    1 - On Thursday morning the fiberglass cloth was ready for trimming;
    2 - The Port side deck transition area was now visibly straight - after the fiberglass cured. The oval area under the photo's number 2, is the perforation for the hawsepipe that has been fiberglassed and will be finished with the foredeck as it takes shape;
    3 - The Starboard side deck transition area is also visibly straight as the Port side. This too was a tough area to work, and:
    4 - Friday night the first coat of primer was applied - we were too tired to minutely inspect the finish so that had to wait until Saturday.

    Saturday
    Saturday.jpg

    1 - Starboard view of the primed cabin top and deck. A careful inspection showed where we'll have to go back, sand and refinish areas that are just plain awful;
    2 - Port view of the primed cabin top and deck. Same issues as with the repairs needed on the Starboard side - but a few less spots to fix;
    3 - Helm/Starboard view of the primed cabin top and side deck, same repairs needed as 1 and 2, and:
    4 - Port side view of the primed cabin and deck. . . same as 1 and 2.

    This week we hope (weather remains an issue) to mask the entire cabin top and begin the KiwiGrip anti-slip application before we topside paint the cabin walls. The decks too will be prepared for KiwiGrip anti-slip.

    That was our week. . . no one is more amazed than we are at the difference a primer coat makes on a heavily worked surface.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  28. #308
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Frankfort, MI
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    9,732

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Really enjoying this thread. For some reason, the picture in post #305 reminded me of a picture I noticed while doing research on a Hooper Island Draketail.

    Jeff C



    3C156221-DA3F-4FE0-9E9A-AE3316D0431B.jpg

  29. #309
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    741

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Saturday.jpg

    That was our week. . . no one is more amazed than we are at the difference a primer coat makes on a heavily worked surface.
    Count me in on the primer visual impact, very nice to see the shapes and curves without construction details evident. Looks great! Have a productive week!

    Mucho motivation now to cover up the Hartley's scars.

    Thanks Joe!

    P.S. BS&T without Al Kooper just didn't work.
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  30. #310
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    Really enjoying this thread. For some reason, the picture in post #305 reminded me of a picture I noticed while doing research on a Hooper Island Draketail.

    Jeff C

    3C156221-DA3F-4FE0-9E9A-AE3316D0431B.jpg
    Hello Jeff,
    Thank you for your kind remark, we appreciate it. Your post piqued our curiosity and you had us at that photo!

    So, we hit the net and searched for the "Hooper Island Draketail."

    Your photo shows the assembly of the transom of the Draketail that uses a similar construction method to the one we used to construct the outboard engine well and the cuddy cabin "nose." We find "barrel construction" the best way to achieve those arced configurations as they are strong and can take pounding, hard bumps and vibrations.

    The Hooper Island Draketail has a beautiful backstory and even though she started out as a huge work boat in the 1930's; she now appears in various lengths, beams and in some cases - as "Gold-Platers." Here is one thirty odd footer we found on the net:
    Hooper Island Draketail.jpg
    The Text below this photo reads:
    Pintail, a Hooper Island Draketail, built by the Apprentice for a Day program, floats right on her lines after being launched at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, MD. Photo by Rick Franke

    Thank you for your contribution, Jeff, we enjoy getting introduced into beautifully designed boats of yesteryear.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  31. #311
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    Jul 2009
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    Zbigit
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    2,197

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Cabin is looking good! Yeah, that was a LOT of work!

  32. #312
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Count me in on the primer visual impact, very nice to see the shapes and curves without construction details evident. Looks great! Have a productive week!

    Mucho motivation now to cover up the Hartley's scars.

    Thanks Joe!

    P.S. BS&T without Al Kooper just didn't work.
    Hello Fish,
    Thank you for the observations and well wishes - we hope the post got you highly stimulated to "get 'er done!"

    Here is a "tidbit" of what we're doing with those curves to continue the motivation!

    Who Said KiwiGrip First.jpg
    The title of this photo is - "Who Said KiwiGrip First?" Logic and the literature says you've gotta topside paint first and then apply KiwiGrip after. . .

    Stay tuned for Sunday's Build Update for the answer to that ditty.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  33. #313
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Cabin is looking good! Yeah, that was a LOT of work!
    Hello Alan,
    Thank you for the accolade and yes. . . it has been a bunch of work and:

    A few chords of "Also sprach Zarathustra" please!
    He Is Baaaack.jpg
    We titled this photo "He's Baaack!" As we all know too well the "shoulder bruiser", "arm buster" and "SOB" are some of the well-earned names the longboard has been called. We went at it all week and our shoulders, arms and muscles are hurting - and we smell like a jar of Bengay.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  34. #314
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    297

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 28 February, 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    The week was chock full of activity as Hadad, the Phoenician weather god, favored the Sun Coast and gave us excellent finishing conditions of sunny, dry, low humidity days.

    It also spurred an unscheduled activity that we'll reveal at the end of this post. . . so, here goes:

    Monday to Wednesday
    Monday to Wednesday.jpg
    1 - On a separate post we asked our forum to suggest an anti-slip method that the members had experience with or found to be better than most. KiwiGrip was one of the suggestions we received and luckily, was available locally from an older gentleman who was closing shop and had a a number of shelves full of the stuff at very competitive prices. For us the KiwiGrip GRAY was what we wanted but felt that the color was more "whitish" than we needed. The man offered to accept the return of the second package [we purchased 2] at full refund price and a "shop credit" for the unused portion of the KiwiGrip we used if we were unhappy with the product. However, we only had 4 days to the week of his closing to "test the product" and get back to him. So, we masked the cabin top and applied the KiwiGrip;
    2 - We were surprised by the ease of application and how we could "texture" the product with pressure variances on the roller. The next morning the stuff had dried and the gray was not that apparent - it appeared as an "off white" color. However, we still had 3 days so;
    3 - We applied the KiwiGrip to the port deck too after we found that we could mask over the product and it wouldn't pull off when the tape was removed, and:
    4 - As the KiwiGrip was setting, we went at the primer with 220 grit on the starboard side of the cabin top with our beloved homemade longboard. After the product was hard on the port side, we went at it but with less "gusto" as our arms were beginning to fail after a few hours of the task.

    Wednesday
    Wednesday.jpg
    1 - To change the pace of the work, and save our arms a bit, we took a few hours break and made a curved [of course] starboard deck plate to finish that side of the deck;
    2 - By Wednesday afternoon we had fiberglassed the plate onto the helm deck frame;
    3 - On Thursday morning the fiberglassed panel was ready for trimming and thereafter, primed, ready for "KiwiGripping" and:
    4 - As we couldn't appreciate the KiwiGrip's gray shade well [the primer was very gray] we decided to topcoat with our very white polyurethane finish so see the actual contrast. Wow, what a difference that first coat made. . . we never did roll and tip so we opted to roll and "tip roll" in lieu of using our 3" (75mm) brush that was on standby. . . just in case.

    Thursday
    Wednesday to Thursday.jpg
    1 - We went at it with gusto as the second coat of finish was applied and the contrast of the gray KiwiGrip and the really shinning white of the paint became very clear;
    2 - The Lewmar hatch was dry fitted on top of the finished cabin top to see the effect of the two finishes and get a feel for the expected result. . . and were satisfied with the results;
    3 - Not wanting to sit and see paint dry. . . we went at the toerail build from an 10' (3m) Ash lumber plank gifted by our good neighbor Stan. We started by laying out the hole pattern for the drains along it's length that we planned on drilling with a 35mm forstner bit, and:
    4 - The holes were drilled and the plank set aside as the day drew to a close.

    Friday & Saturday
    Wednesday Friday Saturday.jpg
    1- The Ash plank was ripped to width and ripped again along the center to make two toerails;
    2 - We made a rig to bend the toerails using the Phoenician bending method we read about many years ago. . . they made their bends using weights and moisture to bend the Cedars of Lebanon - whereas we used the "Ash of Stan" for bending;
    3 - The bend on Saturday afternoon was a full 7" (178mm) after we had sprayed the toerails with RO water from our water filtration system the previous day, and:
    4 - The white of the topside paint on the cabin top was so striking and easy to apply that we plan on stripping the hull and doing it with this system! Okay, so it's a lot of work. . . but we have the time!

    That was our wonderful week - full of hard and grueling work that we enjoyed once again. We wish your week was as satisfying as well.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  35. #315
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Burlington, Vermont, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    It's all coming together so well. I just want to point out that you started this thread about 1 year ago (2/27/2020) and it's been an absolute joy to read your progress reports through this pandemic.

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