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Thread: The Birth of the Night Heron

  1. #211
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Smilemon View Post
    Love the updates! Can't wait to see the seating come together.
    Hey Smilemon,
    Thank you for your kind remarks. . . we've got a concept for the transom seat we put together a few weeks ago that we'll share with you. . . [and all our forum crew-members.]

    Transom Seat Concept.jpg

    This is one of those "add-on" projects that will take 2 weeks or more to complete - hopefully with autumn's cooler, drier, weather we can get it done within that time-frame.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  2. #212
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Wow - the motor well looks great! Nicely done.
    Hey Chris,
    Appreciate the complement - getting the darn thing to look smooth and clean was a bear! We think we spent more time on the "rounding" and finishing of the well than any other part of the build.

    Now onto the transom seat!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  3. #213
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 4 October, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. . . Oh, wait a minute; we can't open with that introduction for the week! It seems that an English writer of some renown from the nineteenth century used that very line. Okay. . . round two:

    The week was good and the week was bad. We had spotty sunshine and spotty rain periods that prevented us from getting a good hold on the planned task - the transom seat.
    Transom Seat & Floor Grates.jpg
    Attachment 69750
    1 - The concept was for a "contoured" transom seat to provide a pleasant sitting area and to hide the wiring/engine fuel/control lines;
    2 - We moved the floor grates forward to begin the measurement and sketch phase but were detained because of the issues on 3 and 4;
    3 - The exterior slats on the port and starboard sides of the grates had to be re-cut to nest into the frames - now new slats have to be made to replace the existing:
    4 - The fuel tanks/seats anchoring feet had to be cut and new ones will have to be made!

    So, as we couldn't work on the ply, we opted to work under the protection of the tarp and awning. We went on to make an interior rail to strengthen the outer rail of the Slipway. The wet weather caused the wheels to cock and cause friction that in-turn placed undue strain on the boat's stem and pulling winch:
    Slipway Modification.jpg
    1 - The original Slipway design was bolted wheels to an exterior rail. It worked well, but it was only a matter of time that as the weight of the Night Heron increased so too increased the pressure on the axle bolt. This additional weight places an angular pressure moment on the bolt, causing the wheel to cock against the rail;
    2 - We made two internal rails, notched to fit inside the existing slipway structure. The bolts were replaced by through axles that distributes the weight on the wheels evenly onto the two rails, preventing the wheels from cocking to either side;
    3 - The photo shows the placement of the internal rail onto the slipway structure;
    4 - The new rails Night Heron rides on made for a smooth 273 pound (124kg) pull up the slipway. . . we should've remembered our strength of materials/angular moment forces classes on this one. . . must be age(?)

    Moving right along. . . in between rain and clear weather hours we did get to do some internal modifications of note:
    Whats New & Better.jpg
    1 - We reinforced the bow/stem assembly with additional shoring up of the collision bulkhead by placing a SYP panting beam across the fist frame coupled to the stem by two panting stringers straddling the stem 4 inches (100mm) above the pulling ring;
    2 - Snap latches were (finally) mounted onto the tank/seats to secure the tops to the boxes;
    3 - We mounted a 12VDC meter on the battery box so that we can see the voltage of the batteries inside;
    4 - The maximum pulling force shown on the scale reflects the effectiveness of the modifications made to the slipway - from an old 450 pound (204kg) to a new 273 pounds (124kg) load - and that with the additional weight of the Night Heron.

    All's well that ends well. . . Oh, wait a minute; can't end this post on that note. . . another known Englishman used that one for a title of a book that has achieve a bit of fame. Okay,

    And that was this week - between dry and wet, we survived, although a bit soggy.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 10-04-2020 at 12:03 PM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  4. #214
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 11 October, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    There was no Dickensian drama or Shakespearean comedy this week on the Sun Coast of Florida; it was a pure, dry, albeit humid, workweek we cherished and took advantage of.

    The "Transom Contour Seat" concept started to take shape. . .
    Monday and Tuesday
    Monday & Tuesday Tasks.jpg
    1 - Monday was the measurement and sketch day that resulted in the front structure of the seat cut and assembled;
    2 - Tuesday was a bonus day as the seat structure was cut and installed;
    3 - Tuesday was also the cardboard pattern day for the starboard and port seats;
    4 - We wrapped up Tuesday with a cardboard seat and backrest pattern.

    Wednesday and Thursday
    Wednesday & Thursday Task.jpg
    1 - Wednesday was plywood cutting from the patterns we made the previous day and;
    2 - Putting the bend for the contour of the backrests using nature - Florida's heat and humidity for two days will bend anything;
    3 - Thursday was dry fitting the seats and fronts and making minor cuts to accommodate them to the space - BTW, the front panels will have access doors in lieu of ports to turn them into life preserver storage lockers;
    4 - First dry fitting of the bent backrests and countless trips to the saw to make minor adjustments.

    Friday
    Friday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The seats were treated with penetrating epoxy and later in the day, they and the back rests were epoxied (loaded with cabosil and wood flour) adhered and mechanically fixed in place with stainless steel nails;
    2 - The seats and backrests were filleted with loaded epoxy in preparation for finishing with our homemade epoxy finishing blend;
    3 - The transom, starboard and port gunwales tops were sanded to make them level for the planned caps that will be made to cover the backrest edges;
    4 - The contour seats ready for "capping" and application of the first coat of epoxy finishing compound.

    Saturday
    Saturday Tasks.jpg
    1 - Starboard contoured seat caps were made, epoxied adhered and mechanically fixed in place with s/s nails - they were sanded smooth, filleted and finished with penetrating epoxy;
    2 - The port contoured seat caps were also installed, sanded, filleted and finished with penetrating epoxy;
    3 - A photo from the starboard side of the contoured seats ready for epoxy compound application on Monday and finishing on Tuesday;
    4 - Photo from the port perspective.

    A fruitful week indeed! This week we hope for good weather so that we can finish the transom seat, cut access doors for the lockers, make the slat locker interior and make floor slats to finish the stern.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  5. #215
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Those look really very comfortable. Nice curves. Very cool!

  6. #216
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    Those look really very comfortable. Nice curves. Very cool!
    Hey gray duck,
    Thank you for the kind comments and observation.

    Your observation gives us the opportunity to share with the cohort where we got the details to design a comfortable transom seat. We used this guide when we were making seats and benches for use around the house and yard.

    Seat Design Criteria.jpg

    BTW, we designed to level 3; it's our belief that boat seats don't have to be ugly, frugal, unbearable wood surfaces or just a plank to get your backside black and blue.

    Additionally, when we finish the seat we plan on sewing a Sunbrella (or equivalent) cushion with a 1" thick closed cell pad to make it even easier on the buttocks - as we all know, a power boat is not like a sailboat when lower speeds make for a softer ride.

    Thanks again. . . and,

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  7. #217
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    Charleston, SC
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    love the seat position guide and science! thanks

  8. #218
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 18 October, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    Another excellent work week just went by and the transom seat just lingered along. . .

    Yes, the supposedly two week project looks like it'll be around for another week as The Old Guy works to build something aesthetically pleasant. . .

    Monday
    1 - Monday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The transom and gunwales caps, seat backs and seats were sanded smooth prior to the application of our homemade fairing compound;
    2 - The fairing compound was literally smeared and an attempt made to round out the back to seat seam;
    3 - We made a small "housing" for the steering arm of the engine that took a half day of adjustments to 5 small custom fitted pieces of wood (3 pieces not seen are inside):
    4 - The day ended with the entire transom seat, back and seat drying - the two fascia pieces that will become lockers were not touched as the access doors have to be cut.

    Tuesday
    2 - Tuesday Tasks.jpg
    1 - Sanding the "housing" took almost as much time as did the port side of the seat;
    2 - The starboard seat was sanded smooth as well and with no protuberances, a lot easier on the hands and fingers;
    3 - The day ended with a first coating of a high build primer application - here shown on the starboard side seat:
    4 - The overall view photo of the transom street from the starboard side.

    Wednesday
    3 - Wednesday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The transom seats and backs, transom and gunwales caps, were second coated with the primer and left to dry (the primer needs 36 hours before sanding);
    2 - Under the seats we started to cut and dry fit the slat bottom and side walls for the lockers [also visible in photo 1);
    3 - The 2 seat fascias were removed and access doors cut on our work bench:
    4 - The day ended with the locker fascias dry fitted to the structure - these panels will be detachable allowing maintenance to the two sump pumps inside an easy task.

    Thursday
    4 - Thursday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The front panels were smeared in fairing compound and set aside to dry;
    2 - The locker interiors were primed and painted and installed;
    3 - Port side photo of the lockers prior to the dry fitting of the epoxy smeared (and dried) front panels:
    4 - The transom seat as of Thursday afternoon.

    Friday and Saturday
    5 - Friday & Saturday Tasks.jpg
    1 - Friday was a day spent fine sanding the surfaces of the primed backs and seats, transom and gunwales caps;
    2 - Saturday we worked on sanding and priming the front panels - shown here is the port seat/locker panel ready for trim pieces and topside painting;
    3 - The Starboard side of the seat/locker panel ready for trim pieces and topside painting:
    4 - The stern as of Saturday afternoon ready for a few trim pieces and topside painting. . . the locker doors will be finished and painted during the week and mounted.

    That was our week - cutting locker components, sanding, finishing, priming and eternal final sanding. . . and we loved every dusty minute of it!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  9. #219
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    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    686

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Greetings Joe,

    That transom settee is looking great! I'm guessing that the supervisor kept his eyes on all of this unique work.

    Thanks!

    Eric

    P.S. Loving the simple ingenuity used to get more images out there.
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  10. #220
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Greetings Joe,

    That transom settee is looking great! I'm guessing that the supervisor kept his eyes on all of this unique work.

    Thanks!

    Eric

    P.S. Loving the simple ingenuity used to get more images out there.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    Hey Eric,
    Good to hear from you. . . hope you're fully settled in the sunshine state and back to some normalcy, or as good as you can in light of this C-19 thing. Optimistically, you'll rekindle your build - we believe our builds help keep us balanced, or at least, with a semblance of sanity as we quarantine in place.

    As for the build. . . thank you for the complement; we were hoping that the transom seat's geometry would break up the monotony of the squareness of the hull - little did we imagine the pronounced change the contoured seat made to the hull's architecture. This was a change we didn't expect! Here is a photo we took on Sunday of the yet unfinished stern/transom seat from the port side.
    Port Stern.jpg

    And yes, the Supervisor now sits on the back of a plastic chair and stares at us when he's not snoozing on it or on top of the tarp structure that he defends from encroachment. [Black-crowned Night Herons, as you'll recall, are night creatures.] Pictures of the snoozing feathered one will follow shortly.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  11. #221
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 25 October, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    Excellent work week number three on the Suncoast, well, almost excellent as Monday was a complete washout. Taking a look around between showers we came up with the following potpourri during the day:

    Monday as Creature Day
    Monday, Creature Day.jpg
    1 - A new addition to our Night Heron Clan flew in, or best said - dropped in making a rolled landing not normal for a two legged bird;
    2 - Miss Tabby came by pulling her two legged walker behind her. [Cat people know what we mean.];
    3 - The Supervisor on his boat tarp perch snoozing - the giveaway are the grey lids covering his red/black pupils:
    4 - Jack came by to nibble on his favorite grass especially planted for him [We think he's a he, but not sure as this writing; there were three and he was the bigger one].

    And the Build:
    Tuesday
    Tuesday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The first topcoat was applied to the transom seat on Tuesday morning;
    2 - The transom seat front panels and locker doors were primed and set to dry;
    3 - The Supervisor's close inspection shortly after the topcoated port front panel dried:
    4 - The Supervisors "Seal of Approval" or "Rejection Stamp" - we're not sure, even today.

    Wednesday & Thursday
    Wednesday & Thursday Tasks.jpg
    1 - We made two corner trim pieces for the starboard and port seats that transition from the horizontal seat surface to the vertical locker panel front;
    2 - The profiles of the corner pieces show the channel that traps the seat's edge and prevents water from intruding into the ply - it also makes a slight edge to prevent "buttock slide" off the seat;
    3 - The trim pieces dry fitted to the seats for final trimming of the ends - we also installed the transom stainless steel cleats:
    4 - The trim pieces primed, topcoated and fitted to the transom seat(s) and a second coat of topside paint applied to the entire seating area.

    Friday
    Friday Tasks.jpg
    1 - Edge pieces were made for the locker doors to hide the uneven front panel cutouts (they were off square) that we were not not happy with;
    2 - The locker doors dry fitted on the front panels;
    3 - View from the the starboard side of the contoured transom seats after a third coat of topside paint on Friday afternoon:
    4 - View from the port side of the contoured transom seats on Friday afternoon.

    Saturday
    Saturday Tasks.jpg
    1 - We asked a neighbor to sit on the bow of Night Heron to ascertain the weight we have available for a cuddy cabin build that doesn't affect the bow's waterline trim. It turns out that his 220 pounds (100kg) and the weight of 120 pounds(45kg) of sandbags on the bow (the bruce anchor, chain and 100 feet (30m) of rode were already on the bow) so our weight for the cuddy cabin is approximately - 320 pounds (145kg);
    2 - Photo of the starboard side of Night Heron with the neighbor and the sandbags on the bow;
    3 - "Honey, have to take the Night Heron out for a test run, be back in an hour or so." Better half replies - "What are you testing?" Old Guy counters - "Need to see how the topside paint responds to the Suncoast Sun." Better half retorts - "You sure have a lot of heavy ballast in your pants!" "I'm coming along too!"
    4 - Oh yeah. . . the topside paint held up well. . . even at fast and slow speed.

    What a week. . . now for the fixing of the tank/seats and building a few slat floor boards for the stern.

    Stay safe stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 10-25-2020 at 10:50 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  12. #222
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    Jul 2007
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    Charleston, SC
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    She's lookin sweet!

  13. #223
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    She's lookin sweet!
    Hey gray duck,
    Thank you for the complement - the work seems lighter when someone takes notice; do appreciate it!

    BTW, taking this reply to also respond to a private note we got asking about the weight on the bow - the photo was too small to see the details. . .

    Here is an enlargement of the same photo where you can see our neighbor Kevin behind the tree branches, all 220 pounds (100kg) of him sitting on the bow after we weighed him on our bathroom scale.

    The Weight on the Bow.jpg

    Have a great week and,

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  14. #224
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 1 November, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    Wow! Another super week of dry, rain free days with a few of them containing low moisture. The Suncoast weather was very conducive to good old fashion boat-work; although looking at the photos makes it seem like not much was done. The work was tedious and gruesome with sawdust flying all over the place as winds gusted to 12mph (10.4Knots) on most days.

    Monday and Tuesday
    1 Monday and Tuesday Tasks.jpg
    1 - We started the week by removing the tank/seat box and cutting the two floor grates at the frame behind the helm. This left the two adjacent sections as the "helm grates." Moving the longer two adjacent grates astern, made them the "stern grates." This obvious action saved us from having to make additional grates for the cockpit area, although it was a very time consuming chore with multiple trips to and from the work bench, cutting, trimming and re-fitting for a good fit;
    2 - A change to the anchoring method for the tanks/seats box to the frames was made by building cradles to keep them low into the frame structure as the weight (6.3 pounds per gallon, or 2.9kgs per 3.8 liters) of each full tank is 38 pounds or 17 kilos. Two full tanks are 76 pounds, or 34 kilos, that should be kept low and evenly distributed on both sides of the hull. As we all know,as the lower center of gravity, the more stable the hull, especially on flat bottomed boats;
    3 - The tank/seat box cradle trim piece made to provide a smooth transition for the 90 degree joint and a water pooling prevention piece;
    4 - The trim piece dry fitted prior to finishing,

    Wednesday and Thursday
    2 Wednesday and Thursday Tasks.jpg
    1 - Dry fitting the tank/seat with the cradle attached - this looks easy, but between adjustments/trimming plus multiple trips to the work bench carrying a heavy box proved taxing as the average daily temperature was 85 degrees F (27 C);
    2 - The "stern grating" was composed of two adjacent pieces that were trimmed in place to insure that they could be joined while being easy to remove for hull cleaning;
    3 - When we pulled up the grating for joining and refinishing, we were unhappy with the aesthetics of the spaces between the frames - they had too many dried epoxy small drops, drippings, runs and attached debris - how did we not see them at the time is still a mystery. Sanding and refinishing the starboard frames and the hull spaces in-between became an obsession - must be that obsessive compulsiveness we all hear about when doing a build (???) A whole day's worth of sanding and refinishing a few frames/spaces no less!
    4 - The last task was dry fitting the tank/seat box (after it dried but tacky) into it's final resting space.

    Friday and Saturday
    3 Friday and Saturday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The starboard stern grates were joined, trimmed, squared and sanded and sanded and sanded - 80, 100 and 200 grit;
    2 - The unfinished starboard stern grate dry fitted behind the finished tank/seat awaiting fixing too;
    3 - Helm grate in place waiting to be trimmed and joined to final dimensions in front of the finished tank/seat;
    4 - The view inside the starboard side of the hull showing the helm grate, finished tank/seat, unfinished stern grate and finished contoured transom seat.

    This was the final photo of the Night Heron's interior, stern view, on Saturday afternoon. . .
    4 Saturday Afternoon.jpg
    A lot of work to be done, such as finishing the starboard side and beginning the port side to suit. . . hopefully with less obsessive compulsiveness.

    Be safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  15. #225
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    Nov 2014
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Looks great! I am eagerly awaiting the start of the cabin process. Do you have a design in mind? I can't remember where you left off with that part of the project.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  16. #226
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Looks great! I am eagerly awaiting the start of the cabin process. Do you have a design in mind? I can't remember where you left off with that part of the project.
    Hey Chris,
    Thank you for the kind remarks, appreciate it!

    Chris, as you know - a thread was started by Bernadette from Queensland around May 2019 titled "cabin construction advice needed" that we followed attentively because we got excellent information reading it - we mention it because it made us change a number of basic designs we had put together based on our structural engineering design experience. Well, translating those land anchored experiences to marine based solutions was not appropriate and our thinking was modified by that thread.

    That said. . .

    Fast forward to the contoured transom seat and now we're in a quandary. The transom seat changed the interior architecture of the hull to an extent that we're thinking of designing a "rounded" or arched exterior for the cabin too. We're delighted that we "broke the square" as a retired architect living down the street asserted when she and her husband visited us a week after the transom seat build.

    Because of this, our daily routine has been modified - after we finish the day's tasks, we sit at the 'puter and attempt to do a cuddy cabin design that emulates the transom's look. The breaking of the squareness inside the hull is the objective. . .

    Sorry for the lengthy reply but that's where we're at; still doodling with cabin architecture.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  17. #227
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    Oct 2014
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    SW Washington/ At Sea
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Great progress...you (and the inspector!) have a good eye for aesthetics. It is easy to build something functional but it's not as simple making it pretty. The night heron is looking better and better, I'm enjoying the thread. Thanks again for sharing.

  18. #228
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Hey Chris,
    Thank you for the kind remarks, appreciate it!

    Chris, as you know - a thread was started by Bernadette from Queensland around May 2019 titled "cabin construction advice needed" that we followed attentively because we got excellent information reading it - we mention it because it made us change a number of basic designs we had put together based on our structural engineering design experience. Well, translating those land anchored experiences to marine based solutions was not appropriate and our thinking was modified by that thread.

    That said. . .

    Fast forward to the contoured transom seat and now we're in a quandary. The transom seat changed the interior architecture of the hull to an extent that we're thinking of designing a "rounded" or arched exterior for the cabin too. We're delighted that we "broke the square" as a retired architect living down the street asserted when she and her husband visited us a week after the transom seat build.

    Because of this, our daily routine has been modified - after we finish the day's tasks, we sit at the 'puter and attempt to do a cuddy cabin design that emulates the transom's look. The breaking of the squareness inside the hull is the objective. . .

    Sorry for the lengthy reply but that's where we're at; still doodling with cabin architecture.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    I am a huge fan of doodling. Looking forward to seeing what you come up with! Have you seen Wojo's thread on his cabin design process for Fontana? You might find some inspiration there.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...8-plywood-boat
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #229
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Great progress...you (and the inspector!) have a good eye for aesthetics. It is easy to build something functional but it's not as simple making it pretty. The night heron is looking better and better, I'm enjoying the thread. Thanks again for sharing.
    Hey Powerwagon,
    Good to hear from you! Thank you for the positive remarks.

    The feathered one and we were at "dead slow ahead" this week but were able to make some progress. . . here is a photo to whet the appetite prior to the Sunday posting:

    Profile of Hold-down.jpg
    This is the profile of the hold-down piece that serves three purposes - to smooth the transition from the vertical to the horizontal plane of the tank/seat box (aesthetics) - to prevent pooling of water in the corner (embedded in silicone sealant) and - to hold in place the removable floor grate (for hull cleaning.)

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  20. #230
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    Dec 2018
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    North Port, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I am a huge fan of doodling. Looking forward to seeing what you come up with! Have you seen Wojo's thread on his cabin design process for Fontana? You might find some inspiration there.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...8-plywood-boat
    Hey Chris,
    Amen. . . doodling brings back memories from our high school days when sitting at an oak desk listening to a boring social studies class from a monotone Mrs. Gleason! Doodling served as an escape from that bleak class. . .

    We've been following your thread on Skookum so it seems like doodling is serving us both very well.

    Thank you for the link to Wheelhouse. . . we just finished reading it all and did find some interesting tips there.

    We'll be posting a concept sketch some time next week.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  21. #231
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    Dec 2018
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    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 8 November, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    Dead slow ahead.

    This week was very unproductive build-wise as elections, high winds and "déjà vu all over again" made for a trying first week of November.

    Monday began as a typical dry day with some wind gusts that did not interfere with the work.
    Monday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The starboard stern grate was finished;
    2 & 3 - The hold-downs for the starboard tank/seat box were made. These profiles serve three purposes - to smooth the transition from the vertical to the horizontal plane of the tank/seat box (aesthetics) - to prevent pooling of water in the corner (embedded in silicone sealant) and - to hold in place the removable floor grate (for hull cleaning):
    4 - On Monday evening we dry fitted the starboard stern grate after it dried enough so it could be handled.

    Tuesday
    Election Day Tueday.jpg
    We were Pol Workers at our local election location so no work on the build occurred;

    Wednesday
    Winds Ruin Wednesday.jpg
    The winds were so strong, at 15 to 20 mph (13 to 17 knots) gusting over 25 mph (22 knots.) We had to abandon the work a half hour after we set up for the bench and unveiled Night Heron.

    Thursday & Friday
    Thursday & Friday Tasks.jpg
    1 - We finally got to work on the nest for the starboard stern grate that is slotted to hold the grate's cross piece;
    2 - Top view of the starboard stern grate nest and the tank/seat box hold-downs finished and ready to install;
    3 - The starboard stern grate nest installed and ready for the grate to be installed:
    4 - The starboard stern grate installed.

    Saturday
    Saturday Tasks.jpg
    1 - The starboard helm grate installed after finishing on Friday and capture by the tank/seat hold-down. The helm hold-down is in the works, albeit facing a number of changes;
    2 - The starboard stern grate permanently installed and held in place by the tank/seat hold-down and the transom mounted nest;
    3 - The starboard stern grate installed showing the locker door, now in controversy:
    4 - The starboard locker door removed after the remark by the better half - "The transom seat looks great but the locker door looks like **** [expletive removed]." We agreed that we could do better. . . stay tuned.

    And that was the agony and the ecstasy for this most unusual week.

    Eta, the tropical storm that may become a hurricane is now near the Suncoast and it looks like, as it was with Sally, that we'll be hit by the right top quadrant (the most dangerous) as she passes going up the Gulf from south to north. This weather may affect us all this week.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  22. #232
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Special Mid-Week Build Update
    Wednesday, 11 November 2020

    Hey All,
    Just a quick note to provide everyone with a "mid-week update" of where we're at. . .

    ETA on Suncoast.jpg

    The scorecard is: Build 0, ETA 45knots

    We're in the thick of it as we write this post. This morning at 0800 hours we "battened down the hatches" and secured Night Heron for the nasty blow and downpour we knew was coming.

    As when we were in Central America under stormy conditions - we're on "anchor watch." The next 12 hours are critical.

    Stay safe stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  23. #233
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    4,354

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Well, I hope you are safe and in the clear.

  24. #234
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    Well, I hope you are safe and in the clear.
    Hey John,
    Thank you for the note. . . we made it through this event twice; once when ETA kissed the Keys and yesterday when it went up our Suncoast. ETA's right top quadrant really put the fear of the almighty in many Floridians. . . especially the second time around.

    ETA's Path.jpg

    The first thing we checked early this morning was whether the Night Heron had suffer any damages - not a scratch! She had water (about 6" - 15cm) and debris inside the bilge from the driving rain but nothing more. The canal waters rose a few feet but did not affect the hull or the slipway.

    Water Level Stern.jpgWater Level Rise.jpg
    These photos show where the canal water level hit it's highest point.

    The rest of the property was OK except for one arbor that was slightly angled - we'll repair it once the ground becomes drier. Clean up of the debris across the yards will be our target today.

    Work on Night Heron will resume on Friday or Saturday.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  25. #235
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Zbigit
    Posts
    1,991

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    It's been a while since I looked in here. The transom seat looks fantastic, you did a great job! I'll be interested to see what you come up with in terms of the cuddy...

    and glad you got through the hurricane with minimal damage! I am seriously jealous of the fact that you can launch the Night Heron, and work on her RIGHT THERE. What I'd give to have a way to launch my boat right off my property into navigable water!

  26. #236
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    It's been a while since I looked in here. The transom seat looks fantastic, you did a great job! I'll be interested to see what you come up with in terms of the cuddy...

    and glad you got through the hurricane with minimal damage! I am seriously jealous of the fact that you can launch the Night Heron, and work on her RIGHT THERE. What I'd give to have a way to launch my boat right off my property into navigable water!
    Hey Alan,
    Good to hear from you; thank you for the kind remarks. . . yes, this last week was real doozie to say the least. Today's build update tells the short story of this unusual week.

    See ya there!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  27. #237
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 15 November, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    This week was one for the books. . . besides being stuck inside and watching canal water rise, we also kept a constant day and night "anchor watch" of the Night Heron. This daily weariness coupled to regular visits to the weather channel made for high anxiety and zero "build activities."

    However, between gusts. . .
    Our Local Osprey.jpg
    Ozzie, our local Osprey took a break on our flagstaff. (The photo was taken through our Lanai window.) A bit of light in an otherwise dreary week.

    Port Side Cleaning.jpg
    Friday, the 13th. no less, was the first day "to do something" inside Night Heron. It was a cleanup and dry out task that took 4 hours. The Port side was scrubbed with vigor as this side is on the agenda for the coming week. We also got a few hours to work on the Port side cabin/tank/seat box grate - measuring, adjusting and making one piece out of two.

    Port Cabin Tank-Seat Grate.jpg
    Saturday was a 3/4 workday and we got to finish the Port side cabin/tank/seat box grate. The two grates behind it are the Port side stern grates that will become one. Work will resume on these, and the gasoline tank/seat box, this coming week. [Weather permitting.] This grate is shown, dry fitted, on the sketch we made for the cabin design, below.

    Cabin Design Helm View.jpg
    OK. . . as some of you know, Chris (of Skookum) and we are doodlers. . . so here is the cabin rendition of that endless week of doodling. The objective here is to "round out." arc or concave the cabin/cockpit fascia to relate to the transom seating. This is our attempt to do away with the squareness of the hull lines and introduce some architecture (a la Frank Gehry) consonant with the "golden ratio." The side view (we're working on at night) is following the ratio so as to eliminate the look of a "top heavy" forward cabin.

    Since our modest program couldn't "round out" or portray an arc/concave form, we highlight on the sketch where we'll attempt to "bend the ply" to conform to the desired form. Stay tuned on this one - it'll be on our agenda after we finish the Port side of the tank/seat and grates now pending - and of course, the locker doors that were not well received by the better half. This "doodling effort" was the only positive outcome of an otherwise tough week.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  28. #238
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Zbigit
    Posts
    1,991

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Part of why I enjoy this thread so much is because it's so entirely different from what I do. Yet the LOA of the boat is in the ballpark of my boats. It's just fun to see what you're up to.

    I like the osprey!

  29. #239
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Part of why I enjoy this thread so much is because it's so entirely different from what I do. Yet the LOA of the boat is in the ballpark of my boats. It's just fun to see what you're up to.

    I like the osprey!
    Hey Alan,
    Thank you for coming aboard and enjoying the cruise! It's always good to have crew on board that serve as Barrelmen; keep a good lookout!

    Any idea, recommendation or observation you see that we can use. . . please jump right in! Remember, we too were rag sailors and cruised the Pacific, South Pacific and a small part of the Southern Ocean on a C&C 34.
    Anchor at Isla Ixtapa, Mexico.jpg
    At anchor at Isla Ixtapa, Ixtapa Island, Mexico.

    BTW, we got a good deal on a used Monitor type 11 we purchased in San Diego prior to starting our cruise south. And yes, in case you're wondering - we avidly followed your Windvane post too.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  30. #240
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 22 November, 2020
    Weekly Build Update

    Hey All,
    This was a wonderful Autumn week that brought to the Suncoast dry, low humidity and fresh days - an outside, exterior, worker's dream. Thursday was the 10% rain chance day that we got at 100% - but other than that. . . a great build week!

    Monday, Nov 16th
    Monday Nov 16 Tasks.jpg
    1 - The first few hours of the day were spent doing arbor maintenance after ETA did a job on the feet embedded in concrete - knocking it to a 45 degree angle;
    2 - We cut the base feet off and installed pvc pipe into the ground, filled them with small river stone bathe in epoxy and fixed the wood feet into the pipe;
    3 - The Port stern, or transom grate nest was cut to size:
    4 - A pad for the three way valve was molded using 1708 glass on the rear corner of the Port tank/seat box [makes for easier, sturdier mounting and safer use].

    Tuesday, Nov 17th
    Tuesday Nov 17 Tasks.jpg
    1 - The hold-downs for the grates for both sides for the tank/seat box were made;
    2 - The Port tank/seat was finished;
    3 - The two transom grates were joined, fitted and cut to size - a half day task that took countless trips to the boat from the work bench:
    4 - The transom grate inside the Lanai after sanding - as this is the point where the wood is most vulnerable - it slept inside our a/c environment.

    Wednesday, Nov 18th
    Wednesday Nov 18 Tasks.jpg
    1 - Dry fitting the transom grate into the locker wall mounted nest made for it;
    2 - Transom grate photo taken over head showing how it sits on the tank/seat box base and locker mounted nest;
    3 - The transom grate finished and drying outside in the yard:
    4 - The installation of the tank/seat showing the three way valve awaiting "plumbing."

    Thursday, Nov 19th - "The 10% rains came."
    Thursday Nov 19 Tasks.jpg
    1 - Using Phi, we entertained ourselves "doodling" with a side view sketch of the Night Heron in an attempt to "horizontally locate" the cuddy cabin/helm station. The results provide a guide as to where to locate the above hull components so that they are, as much as possible, aesthetically pleasing and well proportioned to the LOA:
    2 - The vertical elements, or heights of the cuddy cabin/helm station were also tackled so as to prevent a "top heavy" appearance of the profile of Night Heron. These equations are often overridden for comfort purposes on commercially and some home built craft. We hope to find that fine line between aesthetics and comfort as we design and build our cuddy cabin and helm station.

    Friday and Saturday, Nov 20th & 21st
    Friday and Saturday Nov 20, 21 Tasks.jpg
    1 - The Port transom grate nest was finished and permanently fixed;
    2 - The outboard arm tunnel was widened to eliminate binding of the outboard steering arm when the engine is tilted while trimming underway (still needs Epoxy sealing);
    3 - The Port transom grate is installed and held down by the tank/seat box hold-down. The center grate requires refinishing, a task to be done this coming week, and:
    4 - The Port and Starboard transom rail caps were finished - the two white oak transom rub strakes will be finished and installed this coming week too.

    With the few tasks scheduled for completion this week, we plan on addressing the locker doors that were nixed a few weeks ago. . . hopefully for the last time!

    That was our week - a good one to say the least!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 11-22-2020 at 11:31 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  31. #241
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,788

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    I like the cabin concept. It reminds me a bit of Foto, one of my all-time favorite small motor boats:



    (Photo from the Mystic Seaport Collection)
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  32. #242
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    [QUOTE=cstevens;6326047]I like the cabin concept. It reminds me a bit of Foto, one of my all-time favorite small motor boats:


    WOW Chris!
    Your photograph of Foto got our undivided attention like you have no idea; so much so that we dedicated a number of hours tracking Foto the "chase boat" to see where she ended up.

    Her lines are typically 1932; our take for Night Heron with respect to the cabin and helm station will be 2020 with rounded, not square edges. Never-the-less we were taken with this beautiful boat. . . thank you for the post! BTW, we ran a Phi on her and she seems to come close to that golden ratio!

    Here she is. . . as of 1989 after she was sold to Eddie Cutts of the Cutts & Case Shipyard, Oxford, MD, where a full restoration took place. Where she is today is unknown but we would speculate that is she being kept pristine - at least we'd like to think so.

    Foto 1989.jpg

    Her story is found on this link if anyone is interested:

    http://www.cuttsandcase.com/img/publ...htmagazine.pdf

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  33. #243
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,788

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    She's a pretty special boat isn't she? There was an article in WB on her in the early 1980s too. I'm pretty sure she's still at Cutts & Case now.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #244
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    She's a pretty special boat isn't she? There was an article in WB on her in the early 1980s too. I'm pretty sure she's still at Cutts & Case now.
    Hey Chris,
    You were right - FOTO is at Cutts & Case, on display no less!

    Curiosity being what it is, we contacted Cutts & Case and here is their reply:

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Subject: RE: Whereabouts of FOTO, 1932 Chase Boat
    Hello JG,


    FOTO remains here in Oxford in our Cutts & Case showroom. I think we can all agree it would be lovely if someday she were to join Rosenfeld’s collection in Mystic Seaport.


    Feel free to stop in and visit her anytime.


    Linda Cutts




    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    And here is a side view of her:

    Foto Chase Boat.jpg

    And that's a wrap on FOTO. . . now for the Night Heron cabin/helm station design task. . . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  35. #245
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Thursday, 26 November 2020
    Build Design Update

    Hey All,
    A special Thanksgiving Day salutation to the USA cohort and a belated one to our dear Canadian friends; to those overseas crews that don't celebrate a like holiday - we wish you all peace, health and security wherever you reside.

    As for this post - it was a "fill in job" as we couldn't do much on the interior of the boat on Wednesday due to "humid finishes" (can't explain why) preventing us from getting inside and working the details. So what does a boat builder do when faced with a materials impediment? Doodle, of course!! Here is the product of that doodling.

    On the build's last Sunday post, we kicked around a number of cuddy cabin/helm station ideas for Night Heron using Phi. After Chris responded to that post by posting a similar profile photo of a "chase boat", FOTO. Well, we got hooked!

    We even went as far as touting FOTO's profile and was able to track the America's Cup chase boat commissioned in 1932 by the Rosenfeld Photography Company so they could take fabulous photos of the twelve meters of the day.

    So, here is our design concept for Night Heron and how we arrived at this layout.

    We used Phi, or the "Golden Ratio" and this is what we got.
    Cuddy Cabin - Helm Station Design.jpg

    We also used what we refer to as "Human Gauging" to ascertain heights.
    Human Gauge Sitting.jpgHuman Gauge Standing.jpg

    These ratios and human physical measurements led us to these dimensions.
    Cuddy Cabin - Helm Station Dimensions.jpg

    We also worked out a few mechanical/assembly details.
    Frame Construction Details.jpg
    The cabin top beam may be laminated for strength. . . jury' still out on this one.

    And that has been the last few days efforts to do a practical and aesthetically pleasing cuddy cabin/helm station.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

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