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Thread: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    While you have the blades off to be sharpened/replaced you might consider a couple of new bearings, probably less than $20. I expect them to be sealed and lubricated, a change them every 20-30 years sort of bearing!

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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Agreed on the new sealed high speed bearings. Easy and cheap. Take the existing ones down to the bearing store (canít recall the name) across from Costco on 4th(?) and they will measure and sell you the right ones.

    I know the helical cutter is pricey, but they are SO nice. Have one on my DeWalt planer. The finish is incredible.

    Oops. I was thinking of Bearings Inc on 6th but I see they are permanently closed. Many other bearing suppliers tho.
    Last edited by ron ll; 02-16-2020 at 09:43 PM.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I would use an orbital sander and get all over those flat surfaces with about 80 grit, then finish with 220.
    You won't remove enough metal to measure it.
    Then spray all that shiny iron with a couple coats rattle can clear lacquer.
    Yes that's pretty much what I have in mind. There are a couple of projects ahead of it though. For over a year now I've been promising my son that I would build a shelf around the play room upstairs so we could set up a model railroad layout around the room. I think I'd better get that done before he grows up and gets interested in cars or girls or something!

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I knew that helical head suggestion was coming! There is one available for my old craftsman jointer also but at the cost and how little I use it...

    Lol at least nobody jumped in with the vfd drive suggestion when I mentioned the RPM but I've never heard of a low RPM jointer,.
    I can see you making stiles and rails Chris, might even make new cabinet doors for.... your kitchen? Or parts and pieces for Petrel?
    Kitchen maybe. A remodel is definitely on the list. Although the big house project for this year might be to replace the ancient gas furnace with a heat pump. We'll see. But Petrel is going to need a new door one of these days and I have been thinking about building a nice paneled one. So stiles and rails may be in my future.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    While you have the blades off to be sharpened/replaced you might consider a couple of new bearings, probably less than $20. I expect them to be sealed and lubricated, a change them every 20-30 years sort of bearing!
    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Agreed on the new sealed high speed bearings. Easy and cheap. Take the existing ones down to the bearing store (can’t recall the name) across from Costco on 4th(?) and they will measure and sell you the right ones.

    I know the helical cutter is pricey, but they are SO nice. Have one on my DeWalt planer. The finish is incredible.

    Oops. I was thinking of Bearings Inc on 6th but I see they are permanently closed. Many other bearing suppliers tho.
    Good call on the bearings. I'll definitely add those to the list. As for the helical cutter, I'm sure the results are superior but I just can't bring myself to spend $400 on a part for a $60 tool! Maybe one day if I graduate to an 8" long bed jointer I will splurge.
    - Chris

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  4. #39
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I have a 6" rockwell delta planer and it needed bearings 10 years ago when I bought it.
    Still haven't done it, but changed the blades a couple times. Maybe this year!

  5. #40
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    Chris just take the belt off the cutter head. Spin it from the pulley so you don't get your fingers on the blades, you should hear if the bearings are bad,.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    As an aside, I'm in the technology and media business. I know how much data is collected by web browsers and how it is used to market stuff. And yet I find it utterly disturbing that I am now getting Amazon ads for magnetic jointer knife jigs in my Facebook feed just off of this thread.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I have a small jointer in my shop. I don't edge-join boards much, but I find the tool very good for getting a generally straight edge before going to the table saw.

    So much of the wood you buy these days is curved, warped, at least somewhat, that the jointer saves you stock. You will figure out pretty quickly how to hold the piece, and apply tension, to get one straight edge with a minimum of waste. Then you move to the table saw and can cut parallel straight lines right away.

    It's not my most-used tool in the shop, but I'd miss it if it wasn't there.

  8. #43
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    Sometimes you just think about something and ads turn up. It's great spooky, but great.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    As an aside, I'm in the technology and media business. I know how much data is collected by web browsers and how it is used to market stuff. And yet I find it utterly disturbing that I am now getting Amazon ads for magnetic jointer knife jigs in my Facebook feed just off of this thread.
    I hear you on all levels.

    re: Denise's suggestion of checking the bearings - I realize you would, but just have to say - please unplug it before messing with the belt or blade! OK - at least I feel better now...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?


    From an old tool & die makers perspective the most accurate way of setting jointer blades, no "feel" required, accuracy of .0005 - .001
    Last edited by woodpile; 02-17-2020 at 09:05 AM.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Yup, I use a dial indicator.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    I have a small jointer in my shop. I don't edge-join boards much, but I find the tool very good for getting a generally straight edge before going to the table saw.

    So much of the wood you buy these days is curved, warped, at least somewhat, that the jointer saves you stock. You will figure out pretty quickly how to hold the piece, and apply tension, to get one straight edge with a minimum of waste. Then you move to the table saw and can cut parallel straight lines right away.

    It's not my most-used tool in the shop, but I'd miss it if it wasn't there.
    I suspect that's mostly how I will use this one as well David. I'm entirely tired of fighting with warped lumber.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Sometimes you just think about something and ads turn up. It's great spooky, but great.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    Yes - that's another thing! Sometimes I an shown an ad for something entirely relevant to what I'm thinking but I would swear that I hadn't said anything about it online. The magic of machine learning at work there I suppose.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I hear you on all levels.

    re: Denise's suggestion of checking the bearings - I realize you would, but just have to say - please unplug it before messing with the belt or blade! OK - at least I feel better now...
    Yes - definitely! But it's worth the reminder anyway. I always unplug a tool before making any adjustment.

    Quote Originally Posted by woodpile View Post
    From an old tool & die makers perspective the most accurate way of setting jointer blades, no "feel" required, accuracy of .0005 - .001
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Yup, I use a dial indicator.
    Funny, I do have a dial indicator that I bought twenty five years ago, I think for setting up something critical on a two stroke RS125 race bike. Can't remember what just now. Cylinder head squish or something like that I'm sure. Used if a few times for one season of racing and it's been sitting on the shelf ever since. Might have to break it out again.
    - Chris

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    There are planer knife setting tools with micrometer settings also but they're much more expensive, it's all about the MAGNETS because the blades have to be supported at both ends,

    There was somebody that left one of the screws partially out on his helical head replacement cutters, and when he started it up something went terribly wrong...
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    There are planer knife setting tools with micrometer settings also but they're much more expensive, it's all about the MAGNETS because the blades have to be supported at both ends,

    There was somebody that left one of the screws partially out on his helical head replacement cutters, and when he started it up something went terribly wrong...
    That's ok if you're using high speed steel blades, carbide is non-magnetic.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I have a magnetic dial gage as well, however it is still not nearly as easy to set the jointer knives with that as with the magnetic gadget made for the jointer. That gadget holds both ends of the knives perfectly flush with the bed while your hands are free to tighten the set screws without the knife moving while you do.

  16. #51
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    Lol
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 02-17-2020 at 12:02 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Why would i use carbide and something I hardly ever use?
    Same reason it's used on circular saw blade teeth, router bits and other cutting tools, holds an edge better and will far outlast HSS.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I suspect that's mostly how I will use this one as well David. I'm entirely tired of fighting with warped lumber.



    Yes - that's another thing! Sometimes I an shown an ad for something entirely relevant to what I'm thinking but I would swear that I hadn't said anything about it online. The magic of machine learning at work there I suppose.



    Yes - definitely! But it's worth the reminder anyway. I always unplug a tool before making any adjustment.





    Funny, I do have a dial indicator that I bought twenty five years ago, I think for setting up something critical on a two stroke RS125 race bike. Can't remember what just now. Cylinder head squish or something like that I'm sure. Used if a few times for one season of racing and it's been sitting on the shelf ever since. Might have to break it out again.
    If it's similar to this you're all set, if you're using carbide blades it would be nice to have a carbide tip on the indicator.


  19. #54
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by woodpile View Post
    That's ok if you're using high speed steel blades, carbide is non-magnetic.
    The carbide is just a laminated tip. There’s steel plenty of steel to hold the edge to the magnet.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    The carbide is just a laminated tip. There’s steel plenty of steel to hold the edge to the magnet.
    Depends on what jointer you have, my 4' Delta uses solid carbide blades.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I set jointer knives with a popsicle stick.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I just caught this thread, ............ Nice jointer. You should get a lot of use from it.

    I have a number of vintage 4" jointers and a 6" short bed Delta (1948, with that same rod switch). sure it would be great to have a nice 8" or 10" piece of old iron, but space just doesn't allow it.
    Set it up nicely, learn its limits and it is a very useful tool.
    Great price too!!

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    A note about using dial indicators for a indicating a movable revolving cutter.
    It is easy to misunderestimate the indicator movement from the round ball of the indicator for TDC on the spindle...

    You really need a flat tip to eliminate the possibility of error. (I guess it would be a type of cosine error)
    Like this;
    Tips are available in a variety of thread sizes and configurations for either travel dial (drop) indicators or test (lever) indicators.


    Some Starrett test indicators used to be provided with a flat on one side and a ball on the other.



    For test indicators something like this will work or if you are feeling fussy you can grind a flat on the ball contact, or make one.



    An easy mistake...
    (don't ask how I know this)



  25. #60
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    A note about using dial indicators for a indicating a movable revolving cutter.
    It is easy to misunderestimate the indicator movement from the round ball of the indicator for TDC on the spindle...

    You really need a flat tip to eliminate the possibility of error. (I guess it would be a type of cosine error)
    Like this;
    Tips are available in a variety of thread sizes and configurations for either travel dial (drop) indicators or test (lever) indicators.


    Some Starrett test indicators used to be provided with a flat on one side and a ball on the other.



    For test indicators something like this will work or if you are feeling fussy you can grind a flat on the ball contact, or make one.



    An easy mistake...
    (don't ask how I know this)


    Now you're getting down to the nitty gritty.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Does nobody here use the short piece of square wood method to set their knives???

    magnetic blocks and dial indicators?? what are y'all building out of a material that changes with humidity and temp that demands such precision, lol?
    Last edited by Paul Pless; 02-17-2020 at 06:04 PM.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I do. It's simple quick and accurate and you don't need any jigs.

    Something about that appeals to me.

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    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I set jointer knives with a popsicle stick.
    We use a shard of glass.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Thanks everyone. If nothing else I think I have a good picture of the range of expectations that people bring to the challenge of setting up a tool. We have your old school, wooden block, eye squint approach on the one hand. And the modern, magnetic, polycarbonate, gee-wiz crowd on the other. And in the middle stand the engineers who don't trust wooden blocks or jigs (or even digital gauges) and insist on seeing that little round dial showing 0.00.

    Me, I probably tend toward the wooden block side of things. Case in point, I recently needed to recalibrate the fuel metering valve on the Dickinson stove in Skookum Maru to work with kerosene instead of diesel (for reasons that I will go into some other time). There is a factory procedure that involves measuring the fuel flow from the valve over a certain period of time. But all that fussing about with timers and measured containers seemed like too much complication to me. Instead I fired up the stove, let it warm up, and then adjusted the flow until it looked good at the lowest setting. Just high enough for a good burn and no more. Job done and it's been running great ever since.

    And that's not all! Let me tell you about that time I was guiding the moon lander into our base in the Sea of Tranquility. All those damn computers just get in the way so I switched 'em all off and brought her in by eye. Softest landing you ever saw. "Dead Stick Stevens" they used to call me back at NASA... Ah, er, ahem. Well anyway. As I was saying. Wood blocks seem about my speed but it's going to be a while before I start working on the jointer as I have a few other things to do first.



    Yes - that's right. SpaceX needs me so I'm off to see the universe!

    (In truth that photo was taken by my wife from her hotel balcony this morning. She and the kid are visiting Nana this week and they all went to the Kennedy Space Center today, just in time to watch a SpaceX launch. But I'm not at all envious and am entirely content to be sitting here in my office instead).
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    We use a shard of glass.
    R
    ...to be clear I wrote my little humorous (?) essay above before seeing a post from Rocketman and it is in no way a comment on anything other than the level of boredom I am experiencing at work right now! Also, the drone ship on which the SpaceX boosters land after launch is named "Of Course I Still Love You". Which is awesome.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I do. It's simple quick and accurate and you don't need any jigs.

    Something about that appeals to me.
    i learnt it from you. . .


    before then i was doing the whole dial indicator thing
    Last edited by Paul Pless; 02-17-2020 at 08:16 PM.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I changed that to Rocketman after Pless posted a video of same by Shatner.

    The shard of glass is used the same way as a marked block of wood,except that is is held flatways and the knife scrape/ slurp is measured by ear.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    I own one of those Rockwell joiners, which I retrieved from the curb when someone was disposing of it. Mine is missing the fence, but otherwise works well. Can't say I use it much, but it is handy for some projects. Would like to have the original fence, rather than the one I cobbled up. I use a 12 ins.planer far more often.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Should I buy a 4" jointer?

    Lots of interesting perspectives on this thread! I think you have the right idea though - itís a $60 tool intended to be used. Why over complicate things? Do what you can for reasonable money to get it to perform to reasonable expectations and then enjoy using it! Iím as guilty as anyone in terms of over complicating tool restos at times, so my intent here is to be encouraging, not critical. $20 bearings, an upgraded switch, some sandpaper, and a block of wood to set the blades and I bet youíll enjoy it for years. I guess maybe also paint it for corrosion protection. Youíll know if/when you need to step up in size down the road. Great tool score, congrats!

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