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Thread: Exterior wood oil

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Swap venison for the bear. Bear is too greasy... Oh - & syrup is made in the spring. Otherwise, you nailed it!

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ht=maple+syrup
    Ha, and I thought I was joking! Now I want a bottle of Garret's Own "Neoga" brand maple syrup to enjoy. I'll even design a label for it. (With apologies for the thread drift, although maple syrup and Deks Olje do look somewhat similar at least).
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Ha, and I thought I was joking! Now I want a bottle of Garret's Own "Neoga" brand maple syrup to enjoy. I'll even design a label for it. (With apologies for the thread drift, although maple syrup and Deks Olje do look somewhat similar at least).
    The sugarhouse is actually called "Sticky Paws Sugarworks" - in honor of a particular 4 legged helper.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    The sugarhouse is actually called "Sticky Paws Sugarworks" - in honor of a particular 4 legged helper.
    Even better!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I still have a bit of the pine tar I treated my skis with. I never caught a rag on fire but the pine tar would sometimes flame a bit. Like many of the other old (wise) ones here, I traveled many miles on wood skis. I resisted the newer plastic jobbies as long as I could. Finally, there were no more wood skis to be had.

    Jeff

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I heard somewhere that there is a particular mould in Australia which loves linseed oil. So your nice oiled timber goes black very quickly down under.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk
    The Solvent Free Paint folks say the blackening of Linseed Oil is due to certain proteins in the oil that are great food for mold spores. The Albacks Linseed Oil they sell has these proteins ”cleaned” from the their oil so wood treated with it doesn’t turn black over time. This has been true for the boat parts I treated with their oil. Floorboards and thwarts - still no blackening after many years.
    There is an American manufacturer that treats their Linseed Oil this way, too. I forget the brand but I’ll look at the bottle I have in the shop and post it up here.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I'd love to have a T shirt with Uncle Billy on it. billy.jpg

  7. #42
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    Jun 2014
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    A friend recommended finishing the fir floor boards on the Oughtred designed Penny Fee I'm building with boiled linseed oil thinned more or less arbitrarily with turpentine- or mineral spirits (paint thinner) since tupentine is pretty much unavailable here in California anymore.
    How is Deks #1 different?
    BTW, even the Deks company says don't use Deks #2 on floors because the gloss makes them too slippery.
    thanks
    pvg

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Deks #1 doesn't turn black with age and will be dry and non-sticky enough within a day or two so that it doesn't come off on you.

    I personally never use linseed oil on anything.

    This is probably worth reading

    http://woodenboatpeople.org/forum/to...-and-epoxy-for

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I too use Alback's linseed oil. No blacking yet.

  10. #45
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    Jun 2014
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Deks #1 doesn't turn black with age and will be dry and non-sticky enough within a day or two so that it doesn't come off on you.

    I personally never use linseed oil on anything.

    This is probably worth reading

    http://woodenboatpeople.org/forum/to...-and-epoxy-for
    Thanks, interesting article; perhaps the next question is how does Deks #1 differ from so-called "Danish oil" or Watco?
    pvg

  11. #46
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    Melbourne, Australia
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Just finished applying five coats over Merbau timber rubrails. Didn’t seem to want any more so I left the required half hour and rubbed the excess off. Dead easy to apply once everything was masked. Before starting I gave a final sand of 120# and a liberal dousing of methylated sprit( white spirit I think you northerners call it)
    thanks for the recommendations. And it hardly smells at all

    41661103-B320-499B-BB11-0E1D34AD4E01.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 02-16-2020 at 01:58 AM.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I've read, but not had any reason to try, that if you cannot get hold of good quality linseed oil without the impurities that attracts mold, that storing it cold and dark for a month or so will leave the impurities at the bottom so a good quality oil can be had by carefully pouring it to another container leaving the bottom part.
    Raw linseed oil is the most penetrating oil there is, tung tree oil comes second. Added solvents usually makes no difference in that matter.

    /Mats

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Danish oil is a different thing alltogether, first it is not a fixed formula so it can consist of different oils and solvents depending on the manufactorer, second it is more of a varnish.

    /Mats

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    how does Deks #1 differ from so-called "Danish oil" or Watco?
    Deks #1 is about as thin as water and it isn't unusual to apply up to half a dozen coats, wet on wet, rapid fire until the wood won't soak up more, then wipe excess off and give it a day or two to dry. Watco won't do that. It is thicker and slower to dry, so the process is different. Most people wipe a coat on, give it a couple of days and add another coat. This can continue for as long as you care to do it and eventually you can build up a pretty tough, well sealed surface which just needs an occasional refresher coat. Though it may contain some driers and some varnish, it won't look like it, or really behave like it. It behaves like oil. Mad River Canoe Co. for example, used to "finish" their gunwales with Watco. They came in to the dealers looking very raw and unfinished because the factory didn't have time to keep them for months building up a nice oiled finish and would send them out the door after only a couple of wiped-on oil coats and a couple days to dry. It was up to the customer to continue the process, lightly sanding and reoiling them over an extended period of time. There were some customers who did, and eventually (months later) wound up with nicely sealed, smooth wooden gunwales. An equal number didn't, and they always looked rough and tended to weather in time.

    On fine grained woods like maple and walnut I use a different system with Watco which can't be done with thinner oils like Deks or more open-grained woods like cedar. It will produce a beautiful, baby-butt smooth finish in a day, but mostly it should be used on stuff like furniture or gunstocks. So what might work fine for your galley table or decorative weather station bezel in your boat's cabin probably isn't practical for your working wooden trim. You may not get much use with the technique on your boat, but it can be worth knowing for other stuff. The resulting finish is natural looking, super smooth and feels good in your hands.

    Start with clean, dry, tightly-grained hardwood (maple, walnut, Beech, etc.) In my case, they are usually gunstocks or guitar parts which have been stripped of factory finishes and sanded down to the 320-400 grit range. Parts which have inletting for metal components to fit into need to be sanded very carefully so as not to induce a lot of slop into those wood to metal junctions. If you feel the need to raise the grain, wet the surface down quickly, then go over it with a hair dryer or heat gun to dry it and re-sand. Stain if desired and check to be sure that it didn't raise the grain. If it did, fix it with a little more sanding.

    The first coat of Watco Oil is easy, just wipe a thin coat on, rub it in well and let it sit for half an hour or so. The function of this coat is mostly to check for even absorption and to make sure there are no contaminated spots which might resist the oil. If that looks OK, you are ready for the flood coat. With a paint brush, brush the thickest coat of oil that you can onto the part and let it sit. An old can of Watco which has thickened up a bit over the years will actually do this even better than a new can. Don't disturb it or try to rub it in, we want this to sit until the oil gets really gummy on its surface, which may take as much as two or three hours.

    Now comes the fun part. You are going to generate a genuine hand-rubbed oil finish. I use small-ish hunks (maybe 6" square) of cotton flannel cut from old flannel shirts and the task is basically to try to rub all of the gummy oil off of the wood's surface. The first thing you will notice is that the rubbing is really hard work. The sticky oil doesn't want to come off and isn't going to do so without a fight. If your cloth gets too gummed up, replace it with a new one and keep rubbing. Eventually, there will be a slow transition as the surface changes from gummy to smooth and satin-slick. On something like a rifle butt stock it may take me half an our of serious rubbing to get there, but it is worth the trouble, and at that point there is minimal oil coming off on your hands or anything else the piece touches. A day or two of final drying time takes care of that. If need be, an additional coat can then be added and rubbed out, but you probably won't need to.


    SRC.jpg

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Thanks for the replies; the reason I keep "nagging" is because Deks data sheet says "vehicle- alkyd-urethane resin." I admit my ignorance, but this sounds like varnish to me ?? What am I not understanding about oils vs. varnish?
    Again, thanks all for your patience and indulgence.
    pvg

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    What am I not understanding about oils vs. varnish?
    Maybe you're just overthinking this one. Deks#2 could easily be confused with (or maybe even referred to as) some sort of varnish - and if you are talking about floorboards or other potentially wet walking surfaces, it would be pretty treacherous. There is no way anybody would ever equate Deks #1 (the liquid itself) or the results it provides once dry with varnish or a varnished surface. You can slather on Deks #1 until the cows come home and it will always look and perform like an oiled surface, never a varnished one.

    To me at least as a definite non-BLO fan, "Vehicle - alkyd-urethane resin" probably means that it contains stuff which does not make good food for mold, mildew and rot, and that being synthetic, it is probably a lot less likely to turn black over time.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Funny that major brands like epifanes and le tonkinois uses BLO in their formula.

    /Mats

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