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Thread: Exterior wood oil

  1. #1
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    Default Exterior wood oil

    Probably more a question for Aussies but any way does anyone know of an oil product that I can wipe on a few coats and just wipe another on when the time comes. I know oil doesn’t last but this is for the rubbing strakes and I don’t want varnish.
    just easy for lazy

    just thought about Deks Olje 1 , is this product suitable?
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 02-11-2020 at 06:47 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I've been using a mix of pine tar, linseed oil & a bit of turps. Heating it up to put in on helps.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I use Cetol for the same reasons, I apply it with a throw away brush. I haven't used Deks, but I have heard it's like Cetol.

    Jamie

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I like Deks Olje and it's definitely suitable but you do have to stay on top of it. Follow the instructions and reapply frequently. I haven't used Cetol so can't compare.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Thanks all. Dekes it is

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Deks #1 is good stuff on two conditions:

    (1) Follow the directions and apply coats wet on wet until the surface won't absorb more. Wipe it off and let it dry for a day or two. Don't skimp on the number of coats.

    (2) With any oil finish, if after a few months (or whatever) it looks like it needs an additional coat, then you probably waited longer than was ideal. Re-oil occasionally, but before it starts to look like it needs it. The good news is that it is so easy to re-apply that there really is no excuse for not doing it.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Deks is a 2 part tung oil based varnish. Very good stuff, but it relies on having the 2 parts.

    If you want a simple oil, I would use boat soup, of which there are various recipes...but it is approximately turpentine / tung oil / linseed oil / pine tar, in various ratios to suit the application.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    ... this is all for LESS maintainance ?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Deks is a 2 part tung oil based varnish. Very good stuff, but it relies on having the 2 parts.
    Not true. Deks #1 can be used alone for a matte, oiled finish and works very well as such. It says so right on the can. The addition of Deks #2 is for people who want to end up with a glossy, varnish-like finish, but it is not required. I'm a big fan of Deks #1 and have been using it on various projects for about 40 years. I find it to be pretty much the fastest and most dependable way to generate a good oil finish which will dry consistently, without surprises and in a reasonably short time and resist turning black over time. I have occasionally also used Deks #2 on top of #1, but was never all that thrilled with it compared to good spar varnish.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Not true. Deks #1 can be used alone for a matte, oiled finish and works very well as such. It says so right on the can. The addition of Deks #2 is for people who want to end up with a glossy, varnish-like finish, but it is not required. I'm a big fan of Deks #1 and have been using it on various projects for about 40 years. I find it to be pretty much the fastest and most dependable way to generate a good oil finish which will dry consistently, without surprises and in a reasonably short time and resist turning black over time. I have occasionally also used Deks #2 on top of #1, but was never all that thrilled with it compared to good spar varnish.
    This is my experience as well. As long as you keep up the finish Deks #1 is easy, easy, easy. Goes on with a clean rag or a foam brush. Wipe a coat on occasionally and you are done. No prep besides a basic wipe to remove any dust or dirt and then go.
    - Chris

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Around 1978 I bought a fat fiberglass 14' canoe with those ethafoam flotation bumpers down the sides for my dad and family to use at our place up north. None of them are/were hard core boaters, so it was a good safe choice. Then I built a side mount motor bracket for it to hold a trolling motor. The mount was made from 1.5" thick ash and oil finished with Deks #1 only, following the manufacturer's directions.

    Well....last year I discovered that the last user of the canoe had stashed the boat in the open space under a porch with the detached motor mount just lying next to it on the ground. This boat hasn't been used in at least five years and has been there in the weather all that time.

    Ash doesn't weather very well. It isn't very rot resistant and is prone to a really nasty black fungus, deep down in the pores, so I figured the mount was probably toast and likely to crumble when picked up. Surprisingly though, though weathered some, it is still very solid with no signs of rot and no black fungus showing. The side which was on the ground even still has quite a bit of natural color.

    mount.jpg

    When the weather improves, I'll sand it down and re-oil it. I may not get all the grey color off of the top, but we will see. At least I know that it is fine structurally and should turn out reasonable cosmetically, thanks to Deks #1.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I've been watching this thread - not for my boat - but for some Angelique decks I have at my house.

    I've used "IPE Oil" & it looks great for about 6-8 weeks - even in Vermont's not terribly bright sun. I really don't need to spend the time to oil them 3-4 times/year. Anyone think Deks #1 would last better? Does it change the color much?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    For small areas like rub rails, i prefer Seafin Teak Oil over the Deks #1. The reason is it has more solids and leaves more of a surface finish. Not like varnish, but after a number of coats it has a bit of a buildup on the surface. The Deks is good, but its an oil, all soaked in.

    Both are equally easy to reapply, just a rag or foam roller/brush. No sanding.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    For small areas like rub rails, i prefer Seafin Teak Oil over the Deks #1. The reason is it has more solids and leaves more of a surface finish. Not like varnish, but after a number of coats it has a bit of a buildup on the surface. The Deks is good, but its an oil, all soaked in.

    Both are equally easy to reapply, just a rag or foam roller/brush. No sanding.
    how would it work on a deck?
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Color change with Deks #1 is pretty minimal, and yes, it is quite thin (just judging by the weight of a gallon can, it seems lighter than water to me). I haven't subjected it to the kind of constant weather and UV that a deck or picnic table might get, so I can't say how long it would last in that sort of application without refreshing it. There used to be a Deks ad on the backs of many WoodenBoat magazines that showed Jay Benford's naturally finished boat, but I can't remember whether they mentioned how often they added another coat.

    Important: If you do use Deks, you need a means of evacuating air out of the storage container. A half-full can will start to thicken, reducing its ability to work as designed.

    I also use a fair amount of Watco Oil, but mostly on walnut gun stocks which have been stripped of factory urethanes and will be refinished in oil. It's beautiful, but it's a very different process, and I can't imagine anybody being nuts enough to try it on something as big as a boat. I've used Watco on a few small boat bits like teak handrails, tillers and paddles over the years, but really wasn't sold on the slow repeating process of coats and drying time needed to build up a good finish. Where I can put a beautiful oiled finish on a rifle in a few hours with Watco, a paddle seems to take weeks.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I did some research and found that Practical Sailor did an extensive test of several oil finish products over an extended period, including Seafin and Deks. There are several installments. I haven't read them all yet but here is one of the articles:

    https://www.practical-sailor.com/boa...test-continues

    The only teak oil that made it to Practical Sailors Teak Treatment All Stars finale in the Feb. 15, 2005 issue was Deks Olje No. 1. Testers noted that it penetrated better than any of the varnishes, synthetics, or pigmented stains, but that it was long gone at the six-month mark while other types of coatings were still going strong.
    So the bottom line appears to be that Deks performs well in comparison to other oil finishes, but that varnishes and similar coatings last longer (which is not a surprise).
    - Chris

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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    how would it work on a deck?
    They sell it at the local Dunn lumbers- I believe for that purpose. Assuming you are talking about a house deck.

    For a boat deck, I use Deks #1 on my fir. Either one would probably be fine. They are pretty similar. Note that the Seafin is specifically compatible with varnish, and the can even recommends using it to touch up varnish, which I do regularly on dings or scuffs to hold me over until I get weather good enough for varnishing. The Deks specifically says not to use it with any other finishes. I wipe it off my varnished covering boards if a get a run while doing the deck.

  18. #18
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    Todd is right of course. I've used Deks on spars and floorboards of a small boat. It takes dings well. Stored in a shed so I can't really comment on how it weathers. It smells nice. It's nothing like Cetol.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    A few years ago Deks was supposed to stop being available. Then instead, it became part of the Flood Company (part of PPG) and other than the shape of the cans, everything seemed to stay the same. For a house deck, Deks would probably be awfully expensive (over $40 per liter). It makes me wonder just how much of that technology is present in the Flood penetrating oil, which is substantially cheaper and since it is being made for back yard projects, it also contains an added mildewcide.

    https://www.truevalue.com/wood-finis...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    The Deks I've been buying recently says it is an Owatrol brand. Maybe that is owned in turn by PPG.

    If we are talking about house and deck oils, I've had good luck with Penofin. You get a lot more protection for a single coat, its designed for just one or two coats. Home owners don't tolerate needing 10 coats of oil like us boat owners.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    So where do you get Deks in Western Washington?
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    A few years ago Deks was supposed to stop being available. Then instead, it became part of the Flood Company (part of PPG) and other than the shape of the cans, everything seemed to stay the same. For a house deck, Deks would probably be awfully expensive (over $40 per liter). It makes me wonder just how much of that technology is present in the Flood penetrating oil, which is substantially cheaper and since it is being made for back yard projects, it also contains an added mildewcide.

    https://www.truevalue.com/wood-finis...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
    Thanks!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Orr View Post
    I haven't used Deks, but I have heard it's like Cetol.

    Jamie

    Except it looks good, as opposed to horrible.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    I don’t think Deks Olje has been made by Flood since 2016. Great stuff, though. I get it at Hamilton Marine but you can order it from Jamestown, too.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Seattle Marine and Fishing Supply lists it in Seattle:

    https://www.seamar.com/item/OCU01010/DEKS-OLJE-1-1LTR/

    I have a can of it on the shelf but I'm honestly not sure where I got it.
    - Chris

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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Not true. Deks #1 can be used alone for a matte, oiled finish and works very well as such. It says so right on the can.
    Mea culpa. Forgot about that.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Well, I just wipe all my "brightwork" (spars, trim on fiberglass boat, kayak paddle, etc) down with boiled linseed oil. For the first couple coats on raw wood I cut it a bit with paint thinner (maybe 33% paint thinner, 66% BLO). After that I apply it neat - slop it on with a cloth and wipe it off again 10-15 minutes later. (Don't skip the wipe off or it makes a mess!)

    It seems to work pretty well. The wood seems well protected, though I expect it will gradually darken. Not sure what causes this - UV action on the surface of the wood?

    Anyone know what pine tar brings to the mix? Is it just more resilient?

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Pine tar smells right.... lol I think it adds a bit more UV protection, I also like how it brings out the grain a bit more in the wood.

  29. #29
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    I heard somewhere that there is a particular mould in Australia which loves linseed oil. So your nice oiled timber goes black very quickly down under.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Pine tar repels water really well. Back in the days when cross country skis were all wood, we sealed the ski bottoms with pine tar (and "more modern" pine tar mixtures, diluted a bit with some kind of solvent). You painted a thick coat on the hickory ski bottoms and then went along with a propane or butane torch with a flame spreader keeping it moving and heating up the tar. You watched the surface for little bubbles forming as air came out of the pores of the wood and tar sunk into them. As it did, you wiped the excess off with a rag. You just had to remember not to hit the rag with the flame. Despite first impressions, after a while you get addicted to the smell of the tar.

    Freshly tarred hickory ski bottom with lignostone (resin impregnated compressed beechwood) edges. This base is then waxed for grip and glide on the snow, though in the old days with dry snow people could just ski on the tarred wood without added wax.

    tarski.jpg

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Lignostone edges. I remember when they were a hot ticket - hey I can edge! (a little bit). While never a racer, it was a late fall ritual every year to clean off the old wax & pine tar the skis. I can smell it now. Thx for the reminder.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Lignostone edges. I remember when they were a hot ticket - hey I can edge! (a little bit). While never a racer, it was a late fall ritual every year to clean off the old wax & pine tar the skis. I can smell it now. Thx for the reminder.
    This was just after you had finished salting the bear meat you were putting away for the winter, and boiling the maple sap to make syrup?
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Lignostone edges. I remember when they were a hot ticket - hey I can edge! (a little bit). While never a racer, it was a late fall ritual every year to clean off the old wax & pine tar the skis. I can smell it now. Thx for the reminder.
    +1

    Jamie

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    http://www.tarsmell.com/index.html What great smells. Also I use Deks D1 on a lot of new canoe/boat trim. The stuff is great on new or old wood that's be stripped and sanded. 021.jpg

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Exterior wood oil

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    This was just after you had finished salting the bear meat you were putting away for the winter, and boiling the maple sap to make syrup?
    Swap venison for the bear. Bear is too greasy... Oh - & syrup is made in the spring. Otherwise, you nailed it!

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ht=maple+syrup
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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